What Do Those Golf Scoring Terms (Birdies, Bogeys, Pars) Mean?

So you're new to the game of golf and you keep hearing references to birdies and bogeys, eagles and pars. What are those things, anyway? What do those golf scoring terms mean ?

Those (and other terms) are all names for different types of scores on an individual golf hole.

Start With Par, Go From There to Understand Golf Score Names

When explaining golf scoring terms, start with par, because all the other names of golf scores are defined in relation to par. "Par" refers to the number of strokes an expert golfer is expected to need to complete the play of one hole on a golf course.

Golf holes of different lengths will require more or fewer strokes by a golfer. And regardless of length, the par number of a hole always allows for two putts. So a 150-yard hole is one on which the expert is expected to hit the green with his tee shot, take two putts, and, therefore, require three strokes to finish that hole. Such a hole is therefore called a par-3.

And every hole on a golf course is rated as either a par-3, a par-4 or a par-5 (par-6 holes also exist, but they are rare).

A very good golfer — or a very lucky golfer — might complete a hole in fewer strokes than the par (called "under par"). And of course, most of us are not "experts" at golf, and so on most holes we'll need more strokes than the par (called "over par").

That's where those other terms — birdies, eagles, bogeys, and so on — come into play. They describe a golfer's performance on a hole in relation to the hole's par:

  • A birdie is a score of 1-under par on a hole (for example, scoring 4 on a par-5).
  • A bogey is 1-over par on a hole.
  • An eagle is 2-under par on a hole.
  • A double bogey is 2-over par on a hole.
  • A double eagle (very rare) is 3-under par (also called an "albatross").
  • A triple bogey is 3-over par.

Given that a par-5 hole is the highest par most golfers will ever see, there is a limit to how far under par a golfer can go. But a hole-in-one — knocking the ball in the hole with your first shot — is also called an "ace." (On a par-5 hole, making an ace means a golfer is 4-under on that hole and, yes, golfers have a term for that, too: condor.)

Scores over par can keep going up, and you just keep adding to the prefix, as in quadruple bogey, quintuple bogey, and so on. Here's hoping that's knowledge you'll never need.

The Actual Number of Strokes That Result in These Golf Scores

Here's what these most-common golf scoring terms mean for holes with pars of 5, 4 and 3, in the actual number of strokes:

  • Double eagle: On a par-5, means you finished the hole in 2 strokes
  • Eagle: You finished the hole in 3 strokes
  • Birdie: You finished the hole in 4 strokes
  • Par: You finished the hole in 5 strokes
  • Bogey: You finished the hole in 6 strokes
  • Double bogey: You finished the hole in 7 strokes
  • Triple bogey: You finished the hole in 8 strokes
  • Double eagle: On a par-4, means you finished the hole in 1 stroke — a hole-in-one (very, very rare on par-4 holes)
  • Eagle: You finished the hole in 2 strokes
  • Birdie: You finished the hole in 3 strokes
  • Par: You finished the hole in 4 strokes
  • Bogey: You finished the hole in 5 strokes
  • Double bogey: You finished the hole in 6 strokes
  • Triple bogey: You finished the hole in 7 strokes
  • Double eagle: Double eagles are not possible on par-3 holes (a score of 3-under on a par-3 would be zero)
  • Eagle: You finished the hole in 1 stroke — a hole-in-one
  • Birdie: You finished the hole in 2 strokes
  • Par: You finished the hole in 3 strokes
  • Bogey: You finished the hole in 4 strokes
  • Double bogey: You finished the hole in 5 strokes
  • Triple bogey: You finished the hole in 6 strokes

Note that any hole-in-one or ace will be called by those terms, rather than by double eagle (on a par-4) or eagle (on a par-3). After all, why use double eagle or eagle when you can call it a hole-in-one?

Another note about the alternative term for "double eagle": Albatross is the preferred term in most of the golfing world; double eagle is the preferred term in the United States.

10 Tips to Mark a Golf Scorecard the Right Way

The 9 Best Fanny Packs of 2024, Tested and Reviewed

The 6 Best Women’s Golf Club Sets of 2024

The 10 Best Golf Training Aids of 2024

The 8 Best Golf Putters of 2024

The 9 Best Golf GPS Watches

Types of Golf Clubs: The Complete Guide

Meet the Irons: An Intro for Golf Beginners

The 9 Best Hybrid Golf Clubs

Meet the Wedges: An Intro for Golf Beginners

How to Hold a Putter: Common Putting Grips and Their Pros and Cons

The Best Golf Irons of 2024

The Best Beach Tents of 2024, Tested and Reviewed

The 7 Best Travel Toiletry Bottles of 2024, Tested and Reviewed

The Best Beach Canopies of 2024, Tested and Reviewed

The 7 Best Golf GPS Apps of 2023 for Android and iPhone

By clicking “Accept All Cookies”, you agree to the storing of cookies on your device to enhance site navigation, analyze site usage, and assist in our marketing efforts.

Facebook Logo

Golf Scoring Terms (Par, Bogey, Birdie, Eagle, Albatross, and More)

Last Updated on June 16, 2023

Golf Scoring Terms (Par, Bogey, Birdie, Eagle, Albatross, and More)

We've compiled a list of 100+  golf terms  that are useful to know, but the  golf scoring terms  we'll cover in this guide are among the most essential when you're out on the course or watching televised golf.

Golf Scoring Terms Cheat Sheet

Golf scoring terms explained.

Stroke -  In golf, a "Stroke" is any forward club swing, including when putting, that a golfer is trying to hit the ball. 

You can essentially use "Stroke" as a synonym for a shot/putt, but keep in mind that it also includes "whiffs" if you miss the ball when trying to hit it.

Par - " Par " is the number of strokes that an expert or " scratch golfer " is expected to need to complete a hole. 

Par always includes two putts for each hole. On a par-4 hole, a scratch golfer is supposed to reach the green in two strokes, then complete the hole with two putts.

Distance, or more specifically "effective distance" (the distance a hole plays after accounting for whether it's uphill/downhill, its elevation, etc.), is the main determining factor in a hole's par rating.

Here are the USGA 's distance guidelines for men:

  • Par-3 –  Up to 250 yards
  • Par-4 –  251 to 470 yards
  • Par-5 –  401 to 690 yards

For women, the USGA’s distance guidelines are:

  • Par-3 –  Up to 210 yards
  • Par-4 –  211 to 400 yards
  • Par-5 –  401 to 575 yards

The golf scoring term "Par" is also used to reference the combined par of a group of golf holes.

Full-length 18-hole golf courses include par-3, par-4, and par-5 holes. "Course Par" for the 18 holes will usually be between 69-73, with par-72 being most common for an 18-hole golf course.

Par can also be used for multiple rounds of golf. In the PGA tour, tournaments are usually played over four days, with 18 holes being played each day.

On a par-72 golf course, par for four rounds is 288. On leaderboards and television graphics, you'll usually be shown a professional golfers score relative to par for all holes played thus far in all days of the tournament. Sometimes their scores for individual rounds will also be shown or discussed.

Under Par -  The term "under par" describe a player's score when they've taken fewer strokes than par up to a given point of the golf course.

If a player took 3 strokes to complete a par-3, 3 strokes to complete a par-4, and 4 strokes to complete a par-5 hole, their score could be described as "two under par" or "-2".

birdie en bogey

Over Par -  The term "over par" can describe a player's score relative to par when they've taken more strokes than par.

If a player took 4 strokes to complete a par-3, 6 strokes to complete a par-4, and 4 strokes to complete a par-5 hole, their score could be described as "two over par" or "+2".

Even -  "Even" ("E") can be used to describe a golfer's score when it is equal to the combined par of all holes that they've completed.

A golfer would be even through three holes if they took 4 strokes to complete a par-3, 3 strokes to complete a par-4, and 5 strokes to complete a par-5 hole.

Birdie -  A " Birdie " is when a golfer scores one less stroke than par on an individual golf hole. Ex: 2 strokes on a par-3 hole.

In 2019, the PGA Tour average number of birdies per round was just 3.68 . Justin Thomas led the way, averaging 4.58 birdies per round.

For average golfers, birdies (and even pars) are far more challenging to make than pros would indicate.

MyGolfSpy and TheGrint (a Golf GPS and Golf Handicapping App) analyzed how often users of TheGrint made par, birdie or better, bogey, double bogey, and triple bogey or worse.

As you can see in the chart below, golfers with a 16-20 handicap only average 0.3 birdies or better per round. TheGrint users at the same handicap range only make 3.6 pars per round.

Birdies, Pars, Bogeys Per Handicap - Source MyGolfSpy

It's not until golfer's in that study reached a handicap in the range of 1-5 that they started averaging more than 1 birdie per round (and 9 pars per round).

Eagle -  An " Eagle " is when a golfer scores two fewer strokes than par on an individual golf hole. Ex: 3 strokes on a par-5 hole.

Eagles are most commonly achieved by reaching a par-5 green in 2 strokes, then completing the hole with one putt.

Albatross / Double Eagle -  An " Albatross " or " Double Eagle " is when a golfer scores three fewer strokes than par on an individual golf hole. Ex: 2 strokes on a par-5 hole.

An Albatross is far rarer than even a hole-in-one (ace).

Condor -  A "Condor" is when a golfer scores four strokes less than par on an individual golf hole. A hole in one on a par 5 is a condor.

Only four condors have been recorded in PGA history. Generally, the only way to accomplish a condor is to massively "cut off" a "dogleg" par-5 golf hole for a hole-in-one.

Hole-in-One / Ace -  A "Hole-in-One" or "Ace" occurs when a golfer hits their first shot into the hole (cup), completing the hole in just one stroke. 

Aces are very rare. According to American Hole 'N One, the average golfer's chances of making a hole-in-one on a par-3 hole are 12,500 to 1. The odds improve for professional golfers at 2,500 to 1.

When aces do occur, it's almost always on a par-3 hole, though hole-in-ones have been accomplished on par-4 and even par-5 holes.

Par-3 at Las Vegas Paiute Golf Resort - Source SuperSeeker

Par-3 at Las Vegas Paiute Golf Resort - Source SuperSeeker

Bogey -  A " Bogey " is when a golfer scores one stroke OVER par. Ex: 5 strokes on a par-4 hole.

While a bogey is a bad result for a low handicap or professional golfer, new and less skilled golfers are often fine with only needing one more stroke than par to complete a hole. 

If you got a bogey on every hole of a par-72 course, you'd shoot a 90. This is a major milestone for newer golfers.

Double Bogey -  A "Double Bogey" is when a golfer scores two strokes OVER par. Ex: 6 strokes on a par-4 hole.

Triple Bogey -  A "Triple Bogey" is when a golfer scores three strokes OVER par. Ex: 7 strokes on a par-4 hole.

Quadruple Bogey -  A "Quadruple Bogey" is when a golfer scores four strokes OVER par. Ex: 8 strokes on a par-4 hole.

  • Golf Terms Guide
  • Golf Scoring Terms
  • Best Golf Rangefinder
  • What to Wear Golfing
  • Terms of Service
  • Privacy Policy
  • Affiliate Disclosure

Twitter Icon Link

Golf Expert Blog

The Power of Understanding: What Birdie and Bogey Mean in Golf

Golf is a game that’s been around for centuries, but to the uninitiated, it can seem like an incomprehensible jumble of numbers and terms. If you’re new to the sport or just looking to improve your game, it’s essential to understand the language of golf. That’s where birdies and bogeys come in. These terms describe how many strokes it takes to complete a hole, and they’re an essential part of golf scoring .

A birdie means that a golfer has completed a hole one stroke under par, while a bogey means that they’ve taken one stroke more than par. While birdies are cause for celebration, bogeys can be frustrating, but understanding the terms and what they represent is key to improving your golf game.

In this article, we’ll explore the ins and outs of birdies and bogeys, from what they mean to how to get them. We’ll also delve into the broader topic of golf scoring , including the elusive par and how to improve your game. So if you’re looking to take your golf game to the next level, read on to discover the power of understanding birdies and bogeys.

Ready to take your golf game to the next level? Keep reading to discover everything you need to know about birdies, bogeys, and more. Whether you’re a beginner or an experienced golfer, understanding the language of golf is crucial for success on the course.

A Brief Introduction to Golf Scoring

Golf is a game of precision and strategy, where players use a set of clubs to hit a small ball into a series of holes on a course. Each hole on a course is assigned a number, known as a par. Golf scoring is based on the number of strokes it takes to complete the course, with lower scores indicating better performance. However, golf scoring can be confusing, especially for beginners. In this article, we will explore the basics of golf scoring and focus on two important terms – birdie and bogey.

Understanding Birdie

A birdie is a golf term used to describe when a player completes a hole in one stroke less than the designated par. For example, if a hole is designated as a par 4, and a player completes it in 3 strokes, then they have scored a birdie. This is a great achievement for any golfer, and a scorecard with several birdies is a sign of an impressive round. The term “birdie” was coined in the early 1900s and is thought to have originated from the American slang word “bird,” which was used to describe anything excellent or first-class.

Understanding Bogey

Unlike a birdie, a bogey is when a player completes a hole in one stroke more than the designated par. For example, if a hole is designated as a par 4, and a player completes it in 5 strokes, then they have scored a bogey. Bogeys are common in golf, and even professional golfers will have bogeys in their scorecards. However, too many bogeys can negatively impact a player’s overall score and their chances of winning the game. The term “bogey” is thought to have originated from the British slang word “bogeyman,” which referred to a golfer who consistently played poorly.

Tips for Improving Your Golf Score

  • Practice, practice, practice – the more you play, the better you will get.
  • Understand your strengths and weaknesses and focus on improving your weaknesses.
  • Work on your short game, as this can have a significant impact on your overall score.

Understanding golf scoring and the terms birdie and bogey is crucial for any golfer looking to improve their game. By implementing the tips mentioned above, you can work towards achieving more birdies and avoiding too many bogeys. With time and practice, you may even be able to achieve the ultimate goal of a hole-in-one. Keep practicing, and happy golfing !

What is a Birdie in Golf and How to Get One?

A birdie is a term used in golf to describe a score of one stroke under par on a specific hole. For example, if a golfer scores a 3 on a par 4 hole, they have achieved a birdie. It is considered a significant accomplishment in the sport of golf and is highly sought after by players of all skill levels.

There are a few different strategies that golfers can use to try and achieve a birdie on a particular hole. One of the most important is accuracy. To achieve a birdie, a golfer must hit the ball accurately and position it in a way that allows them to make the next shot more manageable. Another important factor is distance control. The golfer must be able to hit the ball the right distance to reach the green and put themselves in a good position for the next shot.

How to Get a Birdie in Golf

  • Hit an accurate tee shot to set up the hole.
  • Aim for the green and hit a high-quality approach shot.
  • Make the putt on the green to score one stroke under par.

Strategies for Achieving a Birdie in Golf

  • Study the hole and know where the hazards are.
  • Choose the right club for each shot.
  • Practice putting to improve accuracy on the green.

What to Do After Achieving a Birdie in Golf

When a golfer achieves a birdie, it is customary to celebrate the accomplishment. Many golfers will give a high-five to their playing partners or take off their hat and acknowledge the crowd. It’s important to remember that birdies are not easy to come by, so when a golfer gets one, it’s something to be proud of.

Getting a birdie in golf can be a challenging and rewarding experience. With the right strategies and a little bit of luck, any golfer can achieve this impressive feat. Keep reading to learn more about golf scoring and how to improve your game.

The Excitement and Challenge of Chasing a Hole-in-One

Golf is a game of precision, and no shot requires more precision than a hole-in-one. A hole-in-one is when a golfer hits the ball directly into the cup with one stroke from the tee box. It is the ultimate shot in golf, and the accomplishment of a lifetime for many golfers. But what makes it so exciting and challenging?

First, the odds of making a hole-in-one are incredibly low. According to Golf Digest, the odds of an average golfer making a hole-in-one are around 12,500 to Even for professional golfers, the odds are only about 2,500 to This means that a golfer could play for years and never achieve this feat.

The Perfect Shot

To make a hole-in-one, a golfer needs to hit the ball with the perfect amount of force, at the perfect angle, with the perfect club, and with perfect timing. Even a slight miscalculation can result in the ball missing the hole entirely. It requires a great deal of skill, practice, and a bit of luck to make the perfect shot.

The Emotional High

For many golfers, the excitement and emotional high of making a hole-in-one is indescribable. It is a moment that is etched into their memories forever. The feeling of hitting the ball, watching it soar through the air, and then seeing it disappear into the hole is a rush of adrenaline that is hard to replicate.

The Challenge to Improve

For those who have made a hole-in-one, it becomes a lifelong pursuit to do it again. It is a challenge to improve their game and their odds of achieving this feat. Golfers will often play the same hole repeatedly, trying to recreate the same shot that led to their hole-in-one. It becomes a source of motivation and inspiration to continue playing and improving their skills.

Understanding the Elusive Par: What It Is and Why It Matters

Whether you’re a seasoned golfer or just starting out, understanding par is essential to improving your game. Simply put, par is the predetermined number of strokes that an expert golfer is expected to take to complete a hole, and it is the standard against which all golfers are measured. For example, if a hole is a par 4, then an expert golfer is expected to take 4 strokes to complete it.

Knowing what par is and how it works is important because it helps golfers set goals for their round, track their progress, and understand where they need to improve. Par is also used to calculate a player’s handicap , which is a way of leveling the playing field between golfers of different skill levels. The lower a player’s handicap, the better they are considered to be relative to other golfers.

What Factors Affect Par?

  • Length of the Hole: Generally, the longer the hole, the higher the par. This is because it takes more strokes to cover the distance.
  • Number of Hazards: Hazards such as sand traps, water hazards, and rough can add strokes to a golfer’s score and increase the par of a hole.
  • Green Difficulty: The design of the green can also affect the par of a hole. Greens with more undulations and slopes can be more challenging to putt on, increasing the par of the hole.

Why Is Par Important?

Par is important for several reasons. First and foremost, it provides a standard by which golfers can measure their performance and track their progress. Additionally, par is used to calculate handicaps , which allows golfers of different skill levels to compete fairly. Finally, par is a crucial factor in course design, as it determines the length and difficulty of each hole and ultimately affects the overall challenge of the course.

What is a Bogey in Golf and Why It’s Not Always a Bad Thing

Golf is a game of skill, patience, and strategy. One term that is commonly used in golf is “bogey.” Simply put, a bogey means taking one stroke more than par on a hole. While some golfers may view bogeys as a failure, they can actually be a positive thing for your overall score.

Here’s why:

It’s Better Than a Double Bogey

While a bogey means taking one stroke more than par, a double bogey means taking two strokes more than par. When you consider that some holes have a par of 5 or more, a bogey can actually be a good score. If you avoid double bogeys, you’re already doing better than many golfers.

It Helps You Stay Focused

While golfers always aim to make par or better, bogeys can help keep you focused on the present shot rather than worrying about the past or future. In fact, many professional golfers have said that they embrace bogeys as an opportunity to reset and refocus on the task at hand.

It’s a Chance to Learn

Every golfer will make bogeys at some point, even the pros. Instead of getting discouraged, use your bogeys as a learning opportunity. Ask yourself what went wrong and what you can do differently on your next shot. By analyzing your mistakes, you can improve your game and prevent future bogeys.

How to Improve Your Golf Game and Lower Your Score

If you’re looking to take your golf game to the next level, there are a few key things you can do to improve your skills and lower your score. Here are some tips to help you improve:

Practice Consistently

  • Set aside time each week to practice your swing, chipping, and putting
  • Focus on your weaknesses and try to improve them
  • Consider taking lessons from a golf pro to get personalized instruction

Master Your Swing

  • Work on your grip and stance to achieve a more consistent swing
  • Practice hitting the ball with a smooth, fluid motion
  • Learn to control the clubface and clubhead at impact to improve accuracy

Improve Your Short Game

  • Work on your chipping and putting to save strokes around the green
  • Practice hitting bunker shots to get out of sand traps more easily
  • Learn to read greens and judge the speed and slope of putts more accurately

By following these tips and practicing consistently, you can improve your golf game and lower your score. Remember, golf is a game of skill and strategy, and the more you practice and develop your skills, the better you will become.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is a birdie in golf.

A birdie in golf is a score of one stroke under par on a hole. For example, if a golfer scores a 3 on a par 4 hole, that’s a birdie. Birdies are considered good scores and can help lower your overall score.

What is a Bogey in golf?

A bogey in golf is a score of one stroke over par on a hole. For example, if a golfer scores a 5 on a par 4 hole, that’s a bogey. Bogeys are considered average scores and can still help you maintain your overall score.

What is the difference between a birdie and an eagle?

A birdie is one stroke under par, while an eagle is two strokes under par on a hole. For example, if a golfer scores a 2 on a par 4 hole, that’s an eagle. Eagles are rare and are considered exceptional shots.

What is the difference between a bogey and a double bogey?

A bogey is one stroke over par, while a double bogey is two strokes over par on a hole. For example, if a golfer scores a 6 on a par 4 hole, that’s a double bogey. Double bogeys can be frustrating but are a common occurrence for many golfers.

What is a par score in golf?

A par score in golf is the standard number of strokes that a skilled golfer is expected to need to complete a hole. For example, a par 4 hole should take a skilled golfer four strokes to complete. Par scores vary by hole and by course.

How can I improve my chances of getting a birdie?

To improve your chances of getting a birdie, you should focus on accuracy and distance control. Work on hitting your shots straight and placing the ball in the correct position on the green. Also, practice your putting skills, as making a birdie often requires a successful putt.

Privacy Overview

Logo

  • Tips & Guides

Home » What Is a Birdie in Golf? And how to do it

What Is a Birdie in Golf? And how to do it

Brenden Smith

  • Last update - March 12, 2023

What is a Birdie in Golf

If you’re a beginner and don’t know about golf. Then you must become confused by hearing all these terms used by other players and commentators and wonder what these terms mean. So, I will tell you what the golf term birdie means. The term birdie in golf is used to describe a player’s performance on a hole. This term is used to describe the score of a player if he took one stroke under par to complete a hole. It is one of the most common terms used in golf and has been in use in golf for over a century.

In this article, we take a deeper look at what is a birdie in golf, birdie golf definition, its history, and how to score a birdie.

What Is a Birdie? (What Does Birdie Mean In Golf)

A Birdie is a term used to describe when you put a hole in one stroke less than expected strokes. So, for example, completing the hole in four strokes on a 5-par game. Few players can achieve this milestone consistently. Generally, even top PGA players can make a birdie around 15-25% of the time in a round. So, a birdie is an excellent shot and worthy of praise if you can achieve this feat.

History of the birdie term (Why Is It Called A Birdie In Golf)

Generally, there is no concrete evidence that where this term came from. However, there are many theories about the origin of the term “birdie”.

Once, one theory said that the term was first used in the late 19th century by a golfer named Ab Smith. According to this theory, Smith has a habit of using bird names to describe good shots and Smith suggested that one shot less than a par be called a birdie.

Another theory is that this term came from an American slang term bird which describes something extraordinary or excellent and the term birdie is an extension of this slang term to describe an excellent shot. 

It is unknown which theory is correct however, the term birdie has been in use in golf for over a century and is now a worldwide recognized term.

Calculating Your Birdie(Is A Birdie One Under Par)

To calculate your birdie, first, you need to know two things one is your score on a hole and the other is the par for that hole.

A Par is the number of strokes that a player is expected to complete the hole. For example, on a par 5 hole, a player is expected to complete the hole in five shots.

But, if you complete the hole in one stroke less than the par, then you have made a birdie. For example, on a par 5 hole, you completed the hole in four shots., you have made a birdie on that hole. Similarly, if you complete the hole in three strokes on a par 4 hole, you have also made a birdie.

It’s important to note that all these terms are used to describe a player’s score on a single hole, not their overall score for a round of golf. To calculate your overall score for a round, you need to add up the number of strokes you took on every hole, and at the end, the golfer with the lowest score is the winner.

The Actual Number of Strokes That Result in a Birdie (How Many Shots Is A Birdie)

In golf, a score of one stroke over par is called a bogey , two strokes over par are called a double bogey , a score of one stroke under par is called a birdie , two strokes under par is called an eagle , and three strokes under par is called an albatross .

Here we Take a look at the number of strokes required to achieve these terms on par 5, 4, and 3 holes:

  • Double eagle: if you put a hole in 2 strokes
  • Eagle: if you put a hole in 3 strokes
  • Birdie: if you put a hole in 4 strokes
  • Par: if you put a hole in 5 strokes
  • Bogey: if you put a hole in 6 strokes
  • Double bogey: if you put a hole in 7 strokes
  • Triple bogey: if you put a hole in 8 strokes
  • Double eagle: if you put a hole in 1 stroke
  • Eagle: if you put a hole in 2 strokes
  • Birdie: if you put a hole in 3 strokes
  • Par: if you put a hole in 4 strokes
  • Bogey: if you put a hole in 5 strokes
  • Double bogey: if you put a hole in 6 strokes
  • Triple bogey: if you put a hole in 7 strokes
  • Double eagle: not possible on the par-3 hole
  • Eagle: if you put a hole in 1 stroke
  • Birdie: if you put a hole in 2 strokes
  • Par: if you put a hole in 3 strokes
  • Bogey: if you put a hole in 4 strokes
  • Double bogey: if you put a hole in 5 strokes
  • Triple bogey: if you put a hole in 6 strokes

How to score a birdie?

It is very difficult to score a birdie as you will need considerable skills and experience. But here are some tips and tricks and by practicing them you can hit a birdie:

  • Choose the right club: Most players ignore this fact but a good club that matches your gameplay and skill level can drastically improve your game. You will also need to understand which club to be used in which conditions. Generally, a shorter club is used for a shorter distance, while a longer club is used for a longer distance.
  • Correct your stance: A great stance can lead to a long and straight shot. Learn and practice how to stand correctly and hit long shots.
  • Take your shot: Once you’ve chosen your club, and corrected your shot aim for the green, and try to get your ball close to the hole in fewer shots.
  • Perfect your putts: you cannot lower your score and become a birdie if misses too many putts. Try to practice putts more often to improve your game.
  • Practice, Practice, and Practice: now all that remains is practice and consistency. Try to practice all these steps more often and enjoy yourself on the course.

Birdie VS Bogey Vs Eagle(Double Birdie)

Bogey:  Bogey is a score of one stroke above par. This means a player completes a Hole in 6 strokes on a Par 5 hole.

Birdie : On the other hand Birdie happens when a player takes one stroke less to complete a hole.

Eagle:  Lastly Eagle is a Score when a player takes two strokes less to complete a Hole. Eagle is also called Doule Birdie in Golf.

We have guided you with all the information about birdies how to calculate your birdie score in Golf and tips and tricks to become one. Hopefully, the next time you hear these terms you won’t get confused about what that means. Now, all you need to practice to become one of the best players in golf and to ensure that most of your shots go birdie. I encourage all of you to learn all the terminologies about golf and what they mean if you are interested in golf.

1 thought on “What Is a Birdie in Golf? And how to do it”

You are a great writer. Do you have any more webpages?

Leave a Comment Cancel reply

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Connect with us

Recent reviews, best golf sun hats to protect you in hot blazing summer, most forgiving 3 wood, best golf grip in 2023 with prime feel and comfort, best golf balls for mid handicappers, best cavity back irons of the year 2023, best budget golf rangefinder in 2023, recent tips and guides, is golf a sport, low lofted golf clubs: the key to long distance shots, albatross in golf the dream of every golfer, eagle in golf: how to score one, types of golf irons (blade vs cavity back vs muscle back), how to fix a slice in golf.

Logo

The TheGolfitems team has the experience of more than 7 years of playing golf and reviewing golf items. We run the Amazon Affiliate program but be assured that this does not affect our reviews. Our team works hard every day and provides you with our honest opinion to help you to grow.

Useful Links

Subscribe now.

Don’t miss our future updates! Get Subscribed Today!

©2023. Thegolfitems. All Rights Reserved.

Golfweek

Tommy Fleetwood tops Rory McIlroy with birdie-birdie finish to win 2024 Dubai Invitational

Posted: January 14, 2024 | Last updated: January 14, 2024

What a way to start 2024 on the DP World Tour.

The European-based circuit was back in action this week at Dubai Creek Resort with the 2024 Dubai Invitational, a no-cut, 60-player field event that come Sunday featured a three-way fight for the win.

Thriston Lawrence took the clubhouse lead at 18 under with a bogey-free 7-under 64 in the final round, but it was Rory McIlroy (67) who had all the momentum on the back nine after five birdies over his final eight holes. The four-time major champion stood on the 18th tee with a one-shot lead over Ryder Cup teammate Tommy Fleetwood (67) and proceeded to rinse his tee shot in the water left of the fairway, which led to a costly bogey that tied him with Lawrence at 18 under. Just as he did on the 17th, Fleetwood birdied the last to win the tournament by one at 19 under.

The victory is his seventh on the DP World Tour and first since the 2022 Nedbank Golf Challenge.

MORE: European pros dish on Keith Pelley leaving DP World Tour

https://twitter.com/DPWorldTour/status/1746506528406831309

"It's great, that winning feeling is amazing, and it's been a really cool week. Felt like I played better and better throughout the week," said Fleetwood. "Had a great day yesterday, and then today, playing with Rory and coming down the stretch in contention and trying to win a golf tournament was really, really cool."

"It's always very special when you play with one of your friends, one of the best players in the world. Challenging yourself against those guys, like I said just before, Rory's been a very, very supportive influence on me over the past, since I've been him, really, but since we've been close," he continued. "I've watched him do amazing things down the stretch in golf tournaments, and today was my turn."

Despite the disappointing finish after starting the event with a 9-under 62 on Thursday, McIlroy said his first start of the year was "really positive."

"I think first week back out, I think you're going to expect some of those sloppy mistakes, and unfortunately for me, those mistakes came at the wrong time today," said McIlroy, referencing his water ball on the 18th tee. "But you know, I'll reflect on it and learn from today, and there's still a lot of good stuff in there. But just need to tidy up some of the edges, and if I do that, I feel good going into next week."

The DP World Tour will remain in the UAE for another week with the 2024 Hero Dubai Desert Classic at Emirates Golf Club, Jan. 18-21.

This article originally appeared on Golfweek: Tommy Fleetwood tops Rory McIlroy with birdie-birdie finish to win 2024 Dubai Invitational

Rory McIlroy and Tommy Fleetwood bump fists on the 18th green as Fleetwood holes a putt to win the Dubai Invitational at Dubai Creek Golf and Yacht Club on January 14, 2024 in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. (Photo by Warren Little/Getty Images)

More for You

Maddow Blog | Under pressure, Ron DeSantis slams Fox News, conservative media

Maddow Blog | Under pressure, Ron DeSantis slams Fox News, conservative media

Supreme Court Decision: ‘Ghost Guns’ Regulation Revived in 5-4 Vote, Supporting Biden’s Efforts

Judge Denies Jack Smith’s Motion to Compel Trump to Disclose Legal Tactics

CEO responds to 'painful' video of employee who went viral after being fired

CEO responds to 'painful' video of employee who went viral after being fired

birdie en bogey

Dak Prescott asks that his name be included among the possible dismissals: "Add me to the list in that case"

Former MLK speechwriter: Slain civil rights leader would describe Trump as ‘moral fraud’

Former MLK speechwriter: Slain civil rights leader would describe Trump as ‘moral fraud’

Lake Mead Water Levels Change at Rate

Lake Mead Water Levels Change at Rate Not Seen in Years

‘Absolute tragedy of Ron DeSantis’: Joy uncorks on humiliating loss in Iowa

‘Absolute tragedy of Ron DeSantis’: Joy uncorks on humiliating loss in Iowa

Alliance Defending Freedom sent a demand letter to Jefferson County Public Schools alleging their transgender policies were unconstitutional.

More parents claim Colorado school district forced children into overnight rooms with students of opposite sex

Carol Burnett speaks onstage during the 75th Primetime Emmy Awards at Peacock Theater on January 15, 2024 in Los Angeles, California.

Carol Burnett Had the Perfect Punchline About Comedy at the Emmys

Rudy Giuliani Files for Bankruptcy Days After Being Ordered to Pay $148 Million in Defamation Case

Rudy Giuliani Files for Bankruptcy Days After Being Ordered to Pay $148 Million in Defamation Case

The mystery of Siberia's strange exploding craters may have finally been solved

The mystery of Siberia's strange exploding craters may have finally been solved

A view of the U.S. Supreme Court

Supreme Court Could Deal Fatal Blow to Powers of Federal Agencies

'Very' conservative Iowa caucus electorate say they had minds made up: ANALYSIS

Trump trounced in Iowa, and election deniers and MAGA got him there: Entrance polls

Best photos from NFL playoffs' 2024 wild card weekend

Here's how the NFL playoff bracket looks after latest wild-card games

RuPaul at the 2023 Emmys

RuPaul addresses backlash to drag queen library readings in Emmys speech: 'Listen to a drag queen!'

Smoke rises over Gaza during Israeli strikes as seen from southern Israel

Israel bombs targets across Gaza, Hamas to reveal 'fate' of three hostages

Peter Dinklage

‘Game of Thrones’ Star Peter Dinklage Brings the Iron Throne to the Emmys

Massive new $11 billion project could revolutionize US power grid: ‘What’s amazing … is the speed of deployment’

Massive new $11 billion project could revolutionize US power grid: ‘What’s amazing … is the speed of deployment’

Russells Hall Hospital in Dudley, West Midlands, where the safety rating was recently downgraded to Inadequate, because of concerns about emergency and urgent care and diagnostics.

Hospital declares critical incident after running out of beds for patients

Fact Check: A Viral Meme Claims Bill Gates Said US Citizens Must Accept Digital IDs by 2028 or Else. That's False

Fact Check: A Viral Meme Claims Bill Gates Said US Citizens Must Accept Digital IDs by 2028 or Else. That's False

Tommy Fleetwood wins Dubai Invitational in dramatic finish

Tommy Fleetwood edges Rory McIlroy to win the 2024 Dubai Invitational. (Warren Little/Getty Images)

Tommy Fleetwood edges Rory McIlroy to win the 2024 Dubai Invitational. (Warren Little/Getty Images)

Change Text Size

Tommy Fleetwood produced a stunning birdie-birdie finish to hold off the challenge of Rory McIlroy and Thriston Lawrence and win the Dubai Invitational.

The Englishman entered the final day at Dubai Creek Resort with a one-shot lead and with McIlroy his nearest challenger, a mouthwatering head-to-head was in store.

While those around him produced fireworks, Fleetwood was a picture of consistency, but he dropped out of the lead for the first time with a bogey on the 16th.

He was still one back on the 18th tee after he and McIlroy both birdied the penultimate hole but as the Northern Irishman found the water and made a bogey, Fleetwood holed from 16 feet for a 67, a 19-under total and a seventh DP World Tour title.

South African Lawrence finished alongside McIlroy at 18 under, two clear of England's Jordan Smith and three ahead of 2018 Open Champion Francesco Molinari.

The victory is Fleetwood's third in the United Arab Emirates after claiming two wins in Abu Dhabi and follows a second-place finish at the 2023 season-ending DP World Tour Championship.

A first win since the 2022 Nedbank Golf Challenge also moves Fleetwood to the top of the International Swing Rankings, to fourth in the Race to Dubai Rankings in Partnership with Rolex and could take him as high as 11th in the Official World Golf Ranking.

"I'm very happy," said Dubai resident Fleetwood. "It was amazing winning. Like almost everybody else in the world of golf, I don't win anywhere near as much as I would like to but just that winning feeling is great.

"This is obviously where I live and have a lot of support. It's great to kick off the year with a great result and push on from here.

"I feel like I've been saying for a long time that I've been doing a lot of really great things. I have amazing people that I'm working with, win, lose or draw today. Next week will be the same. We just crack on and we keep pushing forward and hopefully keep moving in the right direction.

"I was very happy with the way I played today for the large majority of the round, felt like I didn't hole some of the putts that I wanted to.

"I just stayed patient and kept playing. I knew I was playing very, very well, and even the last two holes, played 17 and 18 great."

Fleetwood and McIlroy both got up and down from the sand for a birdie on the driveable par-4 third and while they missed out on the gettable next, Fleetwood hit a stunning tee shot to 6 feet at the fifth, with McIlroy also making a gain from twice that distance.

Fleetwood led by two after McIlroy found water on the sixth and a stunning bunker shot on the par-5 10th kept the leader ticking over but two birdies after the turn moved Lawrence into contention.

The 27-year-old had driven up to the front of the third, was able to get up and down and then made a two-putt gain on the fourth before putting an approach to 11 feet at the sixth.

A smart up-and-down brought another birdie on the 10th and a 10-footer on the 12th meant he was two back and we had a three-horse race.

McIlroy then launched a booming drive down the 11th and put his second to 3 feet to get back within two before holing from 30 feet on the 12th to sit in solo second.

Lawrence holed from 32 feet on the 14th to join the four-time major champion at 17-under but McIlroy birdied the 13th after a smart lay-up to join the lead, only to three-putt the 14th from 2 feet and leave Fleetwood alone at the summit.

McIlroy bounced straight back from 20 feet at the 15th and with Lawrence hitting a stunner into the 17th and holing from 9 feet, there was a three-way tie.

Lawrence parred the last to sign for a 64 and set the target at 18-under, with Fleetwood dropping out of the lead for the first time all day when he failed to get up and down on the 16th.

A stunning approach from McIlroy to 5 feet at the 17th piled on the pressure but Fleetwood holed from 30 feet and two birdies set the scene for late drama and a two-shot swing on the last.

Smith made an eagle and four birdies in his 66, while Italian Molinari looked back to his best, starting his round with four birdies and adding another five on the back nine in a 63.

American Sean Crocker and in-form South African Zander Lombard finished at 14-under, two shots clear of Dane Thorbjørn Olesen and German Yannik Paul.

Scottish Golf History

Your browser is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites. Learn how to update your browser

Bogey to Blow-Up

There is quite a history behind the golfing terms bogey, par, birdie, eagle and albatross.

Bogey and par were central to the development of handicapping, pioneered by the LGU . The modern meaning of three of the terms - bogey, birdie and eagle - comes from their use in USA.

Bogey Par Birdie Eagle Albatross   Condor

"Bogey" was the first stroke system, developed in England at the end of the 19th Century. The full history is given in Robert Browning's History of Golf 1955 .

In 1890 Mr Hugh Rotherham Secretary of the Coventry Golf Club conceived the idea of standardising the number of shots at each hole that a good golfer should take, which he called the 'ground score.'

GreatYarmouth01

A 'bogle' was a Scottish goblin as far back as the 16th Century and a Bogey-man was a widely used term for a goblin or devil. Golfers of the time considered they were playing a Mister Bogey when measuring themselves against the bogey score. This allowed the introduction of bogey competitions, which we would call handicap competitions or stablefords. 

On 2nd January 1892, The Field reported that 'a novelty was introduced in the shape of a bogey tournament for a prize. ... Fourteen couples started but the bogey defeated them all.'

In 1892, Colonel Seely-Vidal, the Hon Secretary of the United Servic es Club at Gosport, also worked out the 'bogey' for his course. The United Club was a services club and all the members had a military rank. They could not measure themselves against a 'Mister' Bogey or have him as a member, so 'he' was given the honorary rank of Colonel. Thus the term 'Colonel Bogey' was born. 

Later, in the middle of 20th century, bogey was used as the term of one above par.

Par is derived from the stock exchange term that a stock may be above or below its normal or 'par' figure. In 1870, Mr AH Doleman, a golf writer, asked the golf professionals David Strath and James Anderson, what score would win 'The Belt', then the winning trophy for 'The Open', at Prestwick, where it was first held annually from 1861 to 1870. Strath and Anderson said that perfect play should produce a score of 49 for Prestwick's twelve holes. Mr Doleman called this 'par' for Prestwick and subsequently Young Tom Morris won with a score of two strokes 'over par' for the three rounds of 36 holes.

TomMorrisJnr04

In 1911, the United States Golf Association (Men) of the day laid down the following very modern distances for determining par:

As golf developed, scores were coming down, but many old British courses did not adjust their courses or their bogey scores, which meant good golfers and all the professionals were achieving lower than a bogey score. This meant the US had an up-to-date national standard of distances for holes, while the British bogey ratings were determined by each club and were no longer appropriate for professionals. The Americans began referring to one over par as a bogey, much to the British chagrin.

By 1914, British golf magazines were agitating for a ratings system similar to the US. However the Great War 1914-18 intervened and it was not until 1925 that a Golf Unions' Joint Advisory Committee of the British Isles was formed to assign Standard Scratch Scores (SSS), to golf courses in Great Britain and Ireland. Today, this committee is known as the Council of National Golf Unions (CONGU). It is the Golf Unions of each country (and not the Royal and Ancient) who determine pars and handicaps.

"Birdie", meaning a score of one stroke under Par, comes from the early 20th century American slang term "bird", meaning anything excellent. The September 1911 edition of Maclean Magazine described a golf shot as - '"bird" straight down the course, about two hundred and fifteen yards.'  

The Country Club in Atlantic City lay claim to the first use of the word 'birdie' itself, as mentioned on the USGA website. In 1962 the US greenkeepers' magazine reported a conversation with A B Smith. He recounted that, in 1898/9, he and his brother, William P Smith, and their friend, George A Crump, who later built Pine Valley, were playing the par-four second hole at Atlantic City, when Ab Smith's second shot went within inches of the hole. Smith said "That was a bird of shot" and claimed he should get double money if he won with one under par, which was agreed. He duly holed his putt to win with one under par and the three of them thereafter referred to such a score as a "birdie". The Atlantic City Club date the event to 1903.

AtlanticCityCC Birdie

Sea Eagle Fife

Ab Smith ( see Birdie above ) said that his group referred to two under as an 'eagle'.

By 1919 the term was being introduced to Britain, as when Mr H D Gaunt's explained the use of 'birdie' and 'eagle' that he met in Canada . For many years, eagle was always introduced as American terms, as in 1922 when  Cecil (Cecilia) Leitch described a putt for a 3 on a par-5 hole as 'securing what is known in American golfing parlance as an "eagle"' (Golf XII 1922 p 202). 

  Albatross

Albatross is the term for three under par and is a continuation of the birdie and eagle theme, but is in fact a British term. Ab Smith said his group used the phrase 'double eagle' for three under ( see Birdie above ), which is still the term most Americans and the name for their Double Eagle Club  (membership by invitation only).

Three under par is a very rare score and an albatross is a very rare bird. The exact origin is unclear but the first known reference in 1929 indicates that it had been in use for some time before then.  John G Ridland, who scored an 'albatross' in India in 1934 , theorized that it was the introduction of steel shafted clubs in 1920s which made this score common enough to necessitate a name for it. 

Durban CC Hole 18 L

Durban Country Club 18th Hole site of first recorded albatross, a hole-in-one on 271 yard par-4

The first ‘albatross’ score reported as such in the press is from South Africa when E E Wooler scored a hole-in-one in the summer of 1931 on the 18th hole of the Durban Country Club which is a par-4. It cost £40 in drinks but, had he known that he was making history, he would not have minded. 

More details of the first albatrosses, are given in   The Albatross has Landed  in News section. 

A 'condor' in golf is a score of four (4!) under par. This can be achieved by scoring a hole-in-one on a par-5 hole, or by taking two strokes on a par-6 hole, which are themselves as rare as hen's teeth. Until recently, the idea of a condor was not considered to be possible and certainly few people were aware that anyone had scored one.

Golfing condors have been recorded six times around the world over the last 60 years in the USA, the UK and Australia. Until 2020, they were all par-5 'aces'.   More details can be found here .

The Whaup and Double Bogeys

No standard terms for 2 or 3 or more over Par have emerged. They are just double and triple Bogeys. Depending upon how good you are, anything over 7, 8 or 9 will be a ‘Blow-up’ or a ‘Disaster’.

Joyce Wethered once suggested that a hole-in-one should be called a Curlew, known in Scottish as a 'Whaup', which, though fitting, did not catch on. 

It seems that golfing terms came into popular use in much the same way as you find new words being invented and used on the Internet. If they sound good, people start using them. What we do not hear about are all the terms, such as beantops , that never made it because they did not catch on. Only the future can tell which of the terms that we create will still be in use in a hundred years time.

Updated to add Condor 18th July 2023

▲ Back to Top

  • Transfer Centre
  • Live on Sky
  • Get Sky Sports
  • Kick It Out
  • Black Lives Matter
  • British South Asians in Football
  • Work @ Sky Sports
  • Terms & Conditions

Dubai Invitational: Tommy Fleetwood pips Rory McIlroy on final hole to take victory

Tommy Fleetwood found birdies on the 17th and 18th to snatch the lead back from Rory McIlroy and take victory at the Dubai Invitational; McIlroy took the solo lead at the 15th but his tee shot found the water on the 18th and a bogey saw him drop a shot at the final moment

By Megan Wellens

Sunday 14 January 2024 20:55, UK

Please use Chrome browser for a more accessible video player

fleetwood

Tommy Fleetwood holed a high-pressure birdie putt at the 18th hole to snatch victory from Rory McIlroy in the Dubai Invitational.

McIlroy headed into the final hole with a one-shot lead after five birdies across the back nine saw the momentum swing in his favour.

However, his tee shot on the final hole found the water and as he settled for a bogey, Fleetwood sunk the incredible 16-foot birdie to claim victory in Dubai.

  • Final Leaderboard: DP World Tour - Dubai Invitational
  • Rory McIlroy: 'Dream scenario' for golf to have 'world tour'
  • Stream big moments on NOW | Get Sky Sports | Download Sky Sports App

It was a sensational round once again from Fleetwood, five birdies and one bogey sealing a 67, and his highlight came at the 10th as an incredible bunker shot set him up beautifully for his third birdie.

rory

Thriston Lawrence also had a day to remember as he finished second alongside McIlroy, seven birdies and a blemish-free round solidifying his spot.

  • Transfer Centre LIVE! Araujo, Zirkzee, Phillips latest
  • O'Sullivan's astonishing rant at Carter after 'snot' accusation
  • Mourinho sacked by Roma
  • Papers: Everton and Forest face minimum six-point deductions this season
  • Australian Open LIVE! Raducanu, Evans in action after three British wins
  • Everton and Forest charged with breaching Premier League finance rules
  • Messi pips Haaland to Best FIFA men's player of the year in vote tie-break
  • Joshua: I think Usyk will win but I'd rather fight Fury
  • Merson says: I can't see things improving at Man Utd
  • Allison explains how Mercedes 2024 car will be different 
  • Latest News

"It was great. I think I was very happy with the way I played today for the large majority of the round," said Fleetwood.

"I didn't hole some of the putts that I wanted to and it was great watching one of the world's best players in golf in Rory, watching the way he attacked the back nine.

Latest tournament leaderboards

DP World Tour headlines and video

DP World Tour schedule and results

When is DP World Tour live on Sky?

"It was just up and down towards the end. Sloppy bogey on 16th. But birdie, birdie on 17 and 18.

"I was playing very well, I was hitting very solid. I felt very controlled in my game and it was just a case of staying patient.

"It feels amazing winning. I obviously don't win as much as I would like to.

"This is where I live and I have a lot of support and it is great to kick off the year with a good result and push on from here."

birdie en bogey

Fleetwood maintained the lead for the majority of the final round as McIlroy had a day that was full of peaks and troughs, a chance to take the solo lead going begging on the 14th as a birdie chance turned into a three-putt and bogey for the Northern Irishman.

McIlroy showed his class and recovered on the 15th to take the solo lead with a birdie and as Fleetwood faltered with a bogey on the 16th it looked like he would see it out to claim the win.

However, Fleetwood's birdies on the 17th and 18th were met with a birdie and a bogey for McIlroy which saw the lead change with the final shot as the Englishman took victory.

McIlroy was happy with his play but admitted that some "sloppy mistakes" cost him at opportune moments.

birdie en bogey

"For a first week back out it was a really positive week," said McIlroy.

"I am looking back on today - I had a tee shot in the water on the front nine, had the three putt, then the water ball on the last.

"First week back out, I think you have to expect some of those sloppy mistakes. Unfortunately for me, some of those mistakes came at the wrong time.

"I will reflect on it and learn from today and there is still a lot of good stuff in there, I just need to tidy up some of the edges."

Fleetwood

Englishman Jordan Smith finished in fourth place on 16-under while Team Europe's Francesco Molinari had a round to remember as he finished on 15-under and carded a 63.

Despite one bogey on the par three 14th, Molinari found nine birdies, seven in the first 11 holes, finishing with three in a row to finish in fifth place.

Watch McIlroy in action throughout 2024 live on Sky Sports. Stream the PGA Tour, DP World Tour, LPGA Tour and more on NOW .

Golf Now logo.

Get the best prices and book a round at one of 1,700 courses across the UK & Ireland

Enter Course, City, or Postal Code

No results found. Please try another search.

Get Sky Sports

  • Upgrade Now

How to watch Premier League, EFL, AFCON, WSL, boxing, NFL and more

  • Stream with NOW

Sports Definitions

Meet Our Contributors | Contact Us

What are the Golf Scoring Names?

birdie en bogey

Golf is a popular sport enjoyed by millions around the world. A key aspect of this game is understanding the various golf scoring names, which help to indicate a player’s performance on the course. These terms, such as birdie, eagle, and bogey, provide a reference to how well a golfer has played relative to the hole’s designated par.

Having a solid grasp of these golf scoring names not only makes it easier to follow professional tournaments, but also proves beneficial when playing with friends, colleagues, or for personal improvement. In order to enhance your golfing experience and knowledge, familiarizing yourself with these scoring names is essential.

Key Takeaways

  • Golf scoring names, like birdie or bogey, are essential for understanding a golfer’s performance.
  • Par represents the standard score, while terms such as eagle and albatross indicate scores below par.
  • Knowing these terms enhances both your golf playing experience and your ability to follow professional tournaments.

Understanding Golf Scoring

Golf scoring is based on the number of strokes it takes for a player to complete each hole on a course . Each hole has a designated score, known as its par, which may be 3, 4, or 5. To start, let’s examine the common scoring terms for holes with pars of 5, 4, and 3:

  • Double eagle: Finished the hole in 2 strokes
  • Eagle: Finished the hole in 3 strokes
  • Birdie: Finished the hole in 4 strokes
  • Par: Finished the hole in 5 strokes
  • Eagle: Finished the hole in 2 strokes
  • Birdie: Finished the hole in 3 strokes
  • Par: Finished the hole in 4 strokes
  • Bogey: Finished the hole in 5 strokes
  • Birdie: Finished the hole in 2 strokes
  • Par: Finished the hole in 3 strokes
  • Bogey: Finished the hole in 4 strokes

On a full-length golf course, there are typically ten par-4 holes, four par-3 holes, and four par-5 holes, resulting in a total course par of around 72. However, depending on the individual course layout, the total course par may vary from 70 to 73.

As a beginner in golf, you may encounter different colored tee boxes on the course. These colors indicate various levels of difficulty and are designed to cater to players with different skill levels. Here’s what each color represents:

  • Black or gold: Hardest tee for experienced players
  • Blue: Suitable for above-average golfers
  • White: Ideal for high handicap players
  • Red: Offers the shortest tees, great for quick games or absolute beginners
  • Green: Suitable for any player, especially beginners

With this information on golf scoring, you’re now better equipped to chalk up those birdies, pars, and bogeys as you navigate your way around the course. Happy golfing!

birdie en bogey

Par – The Standard Score

In golf, par is the standard number of strokes that an expert golfer is expected to take to complete a hole or a round . The par value determined for each hole is based on the hole’s length, factoring in the average distance that a proficient golfer can hit the ball, and taking into account two putts on the green. Generally, holes are assigned par values between three and five.

A birdie is one of the terms used to score a golfer’s performance on an individual hole in relation to par. To help you better understand the term, let’s explore what it means based on the par of the hole:

Par-3 Hole : On a par-3 hole, achieving a birdie means you completed the hole in two strokes, which is one stroke less than par.

Par-4 Hole : If you finish a par-4 hole in three strokes, that’s considered a birdie since it is one stroke under the par value.

Par-5 Hole : On a par-5 hole, a birdie denotes that you finished the hole in four strokes, again, one stroke less than par.

By scoring birdies, you demonstrate your skill and expertise in managing your shots to complete the hole in fewer strokes than the expected par value. This achievement can lead to a better overall performance in a golf round and helps enhance your playing experience.

Eagle – Two Under Par

An eagle in golf is when you finish a hole in two strokes less than the designated par for that hole. This achievement signifies exceptional skill, given that you’re completing the hole with fewer strokes than what is typically expected. Let’s take a closer look at how you achieve an eagle and its importance in the game of golf.

To better understand an eagle, it’s essential to grasp the concept of par. In golf, par is the standard number of strokes a scratch golfer (a player with a handicap of zero) is expected to complete a hole or a round. For example, if a hole has a par of 4, it’s expected that a scratch golfer will complete the hole in 4 strokes.

Now, let’s say you’re playing a par-4 hole and manage to sink your ball into the hole after just two strokes. Congratulations — you’ve scored an eagle! This rare golfing feat demonstrates both skill and precision, as it requires exceptional ball-striking and course management abilities.

Eagles most commonly occur on par-5 holes, where players with a powerful drive can often reach the green in just two shots. However, they can also happen on par-4 holes and, in extremely rare cases, on par-3 holes (which would also be a hole-in-one).

In terms of score notation, an eagle is represented by a -2 , indicating that your score is two strokes under par. When you achieve an eagle during a round, it can drastically improve your overall score and position on the leaderboard.

To recap, an eagle is a prestigious accomplishment in the game of golf, showcasing a golfer’s high skill level and accuracy. By completing a hole in two strokes less than par, you can significantly boost your score and enhance your reputation as a golfer. Remember to practice and refine your game, and who knows — you might just find yourself scoring more eagles over time.

Albatross – Three Under Par

An albatross is a rare and remarkable achievement in golf. It occurs when you score three strokes under par on a single hole. This impressive feat is also known as a double eagle . The term “albatross” is inspired by the majestic albatross bird, which is known for its immense wingspan and ability to glide gracefully across vast distances.

To better understand an albatross, it’s helpful to know some basic golf scoring terms for context:

  • Par: The predetermined number of strokes that an accomplished golfer should take to complete a hole.
  • Birdie: One stroke under par.
  • Eagle: Two strokes under par.

The possibility of scoring an albatross typically arises on par-5 holes, as it requires you to complete the hole in just two strokes. This often involves a remarkable combination of a long drive and an exceedingly accurate approach shot.

Here’s a brief overview of golf scoring terms from best to worst:

  • Condor : Four strokes under par (-4)
  • Albatross/Double Eagle : Three strokes under par (-3)
  • Eagle : Two strokes under par (-2)
  • Birdie : One stroke under par (-1)
  • Par : Strokes equal to par (0)
  • Bogey : One stroke over par (+1)
  • Double Bogey : Two strokes over par (+2)
  • Triple Bogey : Three strokes over par (+3)

Scoring an albatross is a rare event, and it is considered one of the most exceptional achievements in golf. So, if you ever manage to land one during your golfing career, remember to savor the moment, as it’s an indication of exceptional skill and perhaps a bit of luck as well.

Double Eagle – Rare Scoring

A double eagle, also known as an albatross, is a remarkable achievement in golf that signifies scoring two strokes under par on a single hole. This means that if the hole is a par 5, you would need to sink your ball in just three strokes to achieve a double eagle.

This phenomenal feat is quite rare, as it requires a combination of skill, precision, and favorable conditions. Unlike birdies, which can occur with relative frequency, a double eagle is far less common and is celebrated as a significant event in a golfer’s career.

To put it in perspective, an eagle, which is scoring one stroke under par, does not occur as often as most golfers would like. Many never achieve an eagle in their lifetime, let alone a double eagle. The rarity of this exceptional accomplishment is part of what makes it so remarkable and noteworthy.

It’s worth mentioning that the use of bird names such as birdie, eagle, and albatross in golf scoring is a tradition dating back to the early 1900s. These avian terms were adopted primarily to make scorekeeping more memorable and engaging for both players and spectators alike.

While achieving a double eagle might be an elusive goal, it serves as a testament to the incredible abilities of those golfers who have been fortunate enough to earn this distinguished honor. As you continue your golfing journey, you can appreciate the rarity and prestige associated with a double eagle, and maybe someday, you’ll get the opportunity to claim one for yourself.

Bogey – One Over Par

A bogey is a term used in golf to represent a score of one stroke over par on a specific hole. When you score a bogey, it means you’ve taken one more shot than the par score to finish that particular hole. Bogeys are common in golf, especially for amateur players, as it’s not always easy to achieve par or better consistently.

Double Bogey

A double bogey is two strokes over par on a single hole. This means you’ve taken two more shots to complete the hole than the par score indicates. Double bogeys can occur due to various reasons, such as hitting into hazards , inaccurate shots, or poor putting. To minimize the occurrence of double bogeys in your game, focus on improving your course management and executing shots with better accuracy.

Triple Bogey

A triple bogey is when you finish a hole with a score that is three strokes over par. This represents a significant deviation from the expected score for a hole and usually indicates multiple errors during the course of playing that hole. Factors contributing to triple bogeys can include poor club selection, loss of ball, penalty strokes, or a series of poorly executed shots. To reduce the chances of triple bogeys, work on refining your swing mechanics, understanding course layouts, and making better decisions during your round.

Hole in One – The Best Possible Score

A hole-in-one, also known as an ace, is the best possible score you can achieve in golf. It occurs when a golfer hits the ball from the tee into the hole with their very first shot. Achieving a hole-in-one is a rare and extraordinary accomplishment. The odds of making an ace are approximately 12,500 to 1 for an amateur golfer.

To maximize your chances of scoring a hole-in-one, focus on improving your tee shots, club selection, and course management. Consider factors such as the wind, the flag position, and the green’s slope when planning your shot. As a golfer, you should always aim for consistency and accuracy rather than just seeking power in your swings.

In terms of scoring, a hole-in-one is technically “one under par” for that hole (or -1 relative to par) because you’ve completed the hole in one stroke fewer than the expected number of strokes. For example, if you achieve a hole -in-one on a par-3 hole, your score for that hole is -1. However, since a hole-in-one is a unique and special accomplishment, it’s usually celebrated as its own category rather than just being considered a birdie.

birdie en bogey

Hello, I’m Julian-I am the driving force behind Sports Definitions’ captivating golf content. My love for the sport shines through in my insightful articles, With an innate talent for teaching others on the sport with my definitions. I aim to make you understand the most talked-about questions in the world of golf.

Broad Run Golf & Practice Facility | Bristow, VA

What Is A Birdie In Golf? Explained in Detail

Are you just starting to learn about golf and don’t yet understand the lingo? From birdies to bogeys, the terminology can be confusing for beginner golfers. In this blog post we will demystify one of these common golf terms – a birdie – so that you can understand what it means, why it is important, and how your score can benefit from achieving one on each hole. With an understanding of what a birdie really means in golf, you’ll soon have the confidence and knowledge to hit the green with surety. Let’s take a look at this essential rhetorical device of any golfer!

Table of Contents

What Is A Birdie In Golf?

A Birdie is a score of 1 stroke under par on a hole. For instance, if the par of a hole is 4 strokes, then scoring 3 strokes on that hole would be considered a birdie.

Birdies are generally thought to be relatively uncommon occurrences in golf and often seen as something special when achieved. As such, birdies are usually celebrated by players and can help improve their overall score for the round. Some golfers even have rituals or superstitions associated with achieving birdies that they follow each time they make one.

Eagle shots (2 strokes under par) and Albatrosses (3 strokes under par) may also occur during play, though these are much rarer than birdies!

Although achieving a birdie is impressive, it can also be difficult to sustain over multiple holes and requires both skill and consistency from the player. Golfers who consistently score birdies on their rounds are usually considered to have good form or technique. Additionally, courses with higher pars may demand even more skill for players to make birdies on them.

Overall, making a birdie in golf is an achievement that should be celebrated by all golfers! With practice and dedication, any golfer can learn how to accomplish this feat.

birdie en bogey

How Is A Birdie Scored In Golf?

In golf, a birdie is scored when the player completes the hole in one stroke fewer than par. For example, if a hole has a par score of four and the player completes it in three strokes, they have scored a birdie. If the hole has a par score of five and the player completes it in four strokes, then their score for that hole is called ‘par’ instead of ‘birdie’. As such, scoring a birdie implies that the golfer went above and beyond what was required to complete the hole.

Birdies are considered excellent scores as they represent an improvement in performance over par; however, they can be difficult to achieve depending on the difficulty level of each individual golf course. A golfer’s final score is generally marked by the number of birdies they achieved during the game. Achieving many birdies (or even an ‘eagle’ or ‘albatross’) on a given course can be a great accomplishment for any golfer!

Birdie scores are often celebrated with a specific hand gesture, such as crossing one’s arms over their chest in the shape of an ‘X’, or raising both hands high in the air. This ensures that everyone knows when a player has achieved a successful birdie score and allows them to share in the joy of the moment! Birdie scores should never be taken lightly; they represent hard work and dedication, and should always be celebrated appropriately. Whether it’s a casual game or an important tournament, birdies should always be recognized and appreciated.

In summary, birdie scores in golf represent the golfer completing a hole with one stroke fewer than par. Birdies can be difficult to achieve, but are great accomplishments for any golfer when they do! They should be celebrated appropriately and serve as an encouragement for players to strive for better results. With practice, determination, and skill, any golfer has the potential to score frequent birdies on the course!

What Is The Difference Between A Birdie And A Bogey In Golf?

The terms birdie and bogey are used in golf to denote scoring on a particular hole. A birdie is one stroke (or more) under par, while a bogey is one stroke (or more) over par. For example, if the par of a particular hole is 4, and a golfer scores 3 strokes, they have achieved a birdie; if they score 5 or more strokes, then it is called a bogey. Birdies can affect the overall scorecard differently depending on the handicap system being used. In some cases, they may be worth extra points and count towards improving the golfer’s handicap index; in other cases they may not add any points at all.

Bogeys typically only count towards the golfer’s overall score, but can still have a significant impact on the final outcome of a round.  Knowing when to aim for birdies and when to avoid bogeys is an important skill in golf. It requires careful consideration of each hole and accurate assessment of one’s own abilities before deciding on a course of action. This can be difficult and comes with practice, so don’t get discouraged if you struggle at first! With some patience and determination, you will soon be able to master this essential part of the game.

What Is The Difference Between A Birdie And An Eagle In Golf?

In golf, a birdie is a score of one stroke below par on a hole. An eagle is two strokes below par on the same hole. Birdies are generally considered to be fairly common scores in golf and can often be achieved by average players. Eagles, however, are more rare and usually require very good shot-making or luck for an amateur golfer to achieve one. As such, they are seen as something of an accomplishment when attained and celebrated accordingly.

Both birds and eagles provide an advantage over other players who have made pars or bogeys on the same hole, but an eagle gives the player much greater value in terms of their net score for that particular hole. When multiple players have scored either a birdie or an eagle on the same hole, the one who achieved the lower score is typically considered to have won that particular hole.

In summary, while both birdies and eagles offer a significant advantage over pars and bogeys in golf , an eagle is generally seen as more of an accomplishment due to its rarity compared to birdies. It requires greater skill or luck to achieve an eagle, and therefore provides a larger benefit in terms of net score for that particular hole. As such, when players achieve either a birdie or an eagle on the same hole, the one with the better score will usually be considered to have won it.

birdie en bogey

What Is The Difference Between A Birdie And A Hole In One In Golf?

In golf, a birdie is a score of one stroke under par on a hole. For example, if the par for a particular hole is 4 strokes, then scoring 3 strokes would be considered a birdie. A hole in one (also known as an “ace”) occurs when the player completes the hole using only one stroke. This requires the ball to be hit from the tee and land into the designated cup without ever touching the ground or coming back out of it.

The difference between these two scores can be summarized by saying that while both are below par and provide a great advantage to their respective players, only a hole in one will allow them to finish the entire hole with no additional strokes required. Therefore, achieving an ace is a much more remarkable accomplishment than scoring a birdie.

Overall, both birdies and holes in one are difficult to achieve due to the long distances involved and precision required from the golfer, but only an ace will guarantee them reaching their target and completing the hole with no additional strokes needed.  As such, it is considered to be a much rarer and more impressive feat in golf.

How Often Do Professional Golfers Make Birdies?

Professional golfers make birdies with great frequency. Generally speaking, a professional golfer can expect to make an average of 6-7 birdies in a regular round of 18 holes. This number varies depending on the skill level of the player, and is often higher for PGA Tour Professionals than it is for players on lower tour levels. Furthermore, course difficulty has been known to change this statistic significantly as well; more difficult courses generally result in fewer birdies being made throughout the course of play.

Although making birdies can be quite difficult at times, a skilled professional golfer should have no problem consistently hitting them throughout their rounds. The key to success lies in smart play that combines accuracy off the tee with good shot selection and a strong short game. With the right combination of skill, practice, and luck, professional golfers can make birdies with regularity.

What Is The Record For The Most Birdies In A Single Round Of Golf?

The record for most birdies in a single round of golf is held by Jason Bohn, who made an incredible 18 birdies during the 2018 Honda Classic. This was enough to tie the previous PGA Tour record set by Robert Gamez in 1990 at the Northern Trust Open. The feat was all the more impressive considering it included 12 consecutive birdies on holes 4 through 15, which has been described as one of the greatest displays of putting ever seen on a golf course. Bohn’s achievement was recognized with a standing ovation from his fellow competitors and members of the gallery, making it truly a memorable moment in golfing history.

Making birdies is an essential part of success for professional golfers. Not only do they provide mental boosts after good shots, but they also contribute to improved scores in tournaments. Professional golfers who are able to consistently make birdies tend to have better results in events than those who struggle to hit them. By continuing to practice their skills on the course, professionals can improve their abilities and become more consistent birdie makers over time.

With enough dedication and hard work, it’s possible for any golfer to make birdies like a professional – even if it doesn’t happen on every hole. Professional golfers typically make birdies at least 6-7 times in a round of 18 holes, and by honing their skills and learning to play the game strategically, any golfer can increase their chances of hitting birdies as well.

No matter the skill level, making birdies is an important part of improving one’s game and becoming a better golfer overall. Through smart play and strong mental focus, professional golfers are able to consistently hit them – and so can you! With enough practice and dedication, you too can make birdies with regularity just like a professional.

9 vs 10.5 Degree Driver: What Average Golfers Should Use

>>> You might also like:

Stiff Shaft Vs Regular Shaft

Callaway Epic Speed Vs Epic Max

Best golf shoes for plantar fasciitis

Any Other Tips For Making Birdies In Golf?

Practicing visualization can also be beneficial for making birdies in golf. Visualization is the practice of imagining yourself achieving your goal before it happens. This will help you to focus and stay positive during each shot. Additionally, focusing on the target rather than the obstacles that lie ahead can be helpful. Finally, take some time to learn how to read greens properly, as this will significantly increase your chances of making a birdie putt. With these tips, you should feel more confident in your ability to make birdies when playing golf!

What Are Some Of The Best Golf Courses For Birdie-Hunting?

There are some spectacular golf courses around the world that provide a great opportunity to search for birdies. Whether you’re looking for an exclusive private course or a public course, there are plenty of options for all levels of skill and budget. Here is a list of some of the best golf courses for birdie-hunting:

– Pebble Beach Golf Links – This legendary California course has been home to multiple US Opens and is one of the most beautiful and challenging courses in the country. The stunning scenery along the Monterey Peninsula makes it ideal for birdie-hunting.

– Pine Valley Golf Club – Located in New Jersey, this exclusive private club features deep bunkers, fast greens, and narrow fairways, making it a great place to search for birdies.

– Muirfield Village Golf Club – This Jack Nicklaus-designed gem in Ohio is always considered one of the most difficult courses on the PGA Tour and provides ample opportunities to find birdies.

– Country Club of Charleston – This course located in South Carolina has rolling terrain, tight fairways, and fast greens that will test your ability to find birdies.

– Cypress Point Club – Another exclusive private club located in California, Cypress Point is regarded as one of the most spectacular golf courses in the world. With incredible ocean views and beautiful vegetation, this course offers plenty of chances for finding birdies.

No matter your skill level or budget, there is a golf course available with plenty of birdie-hunting opportunities. With the right preparation and practice, you can make the most out of any round of golf. So grab your clubs and get ready to search for birdies!

>>> See more: Golf: Birdie, Par & Bogey – What is a birdie in golf?

In conclusion , there is much to learn about golf and the mysterious birdie! Birdies are used to keep score and can be a great way to reward yourself for a successful hole. Golfers of all skill levels should take the time to develop their understanding of what a birdie is in golf. The knowledge acquired will give them an advantage in knowing when to aim for the opportunity and how to maximize the benefits that come with it.

Ask yourself, do you know what a birdie is in golf? Remember, practice makes perfect and even if you don’t necessarily hit one out of the park every time, don’t give up on your dreams. With persistence and determination, you too can master the mystical birdie and experience its true potential!

What is a birdie in golf? The Broad Run Golf blog is a resource for golfers of all skill levels. From beginner tips to advanced techniques, we cover everything you need to know to improve your game.

Jeremy Lambert

Jeremy Lambert is a passionate professional golfer who has always had an affinity for the sport. He began playing golf in his early teens, quickly developing an enthusiasm for perfecting his craft and competing in tournaments. With unwavering determination, he honed his skills to become an accomplished athlete on the course. His extensive knowledge of technique and golf etiquette have earned him respect from fellow players and coaches alike. His cheerful demeanor and dedication to the game are admirable qualities that prove him to be a true champion of the green.

The Golf Holes

Golf Scoring Terms (Par, Bogey, Eagle, Birdie, Albatross, and More)

Golf Scoring Terms

Golf, a sport that melds skill, strategy, and a touch of finesse, comes with its own rich vocabulary of Golf scoring terms . From the familiar Stroke to the elusive Condor , each term encapsulates a moment on the course, a stroke of the club that defines a golfer’s journey. Let’s unravel the language of golf scoring and explore the nuances of Stroke, Par, Birdie, Eagle, Albatross , and more.

Normal Loft of a Pitching Wedge in Golf.

Table of contents: golf scoring terms., stroke: the fundamental unit, par: the benchmark of performance, even: a perfect balance, bogey: a minor setback, double bogey, triple bogey, quadruple bogey: escalating challenges, birdie: soaring above par, eagle: majestic mastery, albatross / double eagle: rare and remarkable, condor: the mythical marvel, hole-in-one / ace: a stroke of perfection, conclusion: a tapestry of golfing moments, faqs: golf scoring terms..

birdie en bogey

Understanding the Basics: Stroke and Par

At the heart of golf scoring is the concept of a Stroke . This term refers to each time a golfer takes a swing at the ball. Every stroke counts, and the cumulative total shapes the scorecard at the end of a round.

Par sets the standard for each hole on the course. It represents the number of strokes a skilled golfer is expected to take to complete the hole. Scoring Under Par means completing the hole in fewer strokes, while going Over Par signifies a score higher than the expected number.

When a golfer matches the expected number of strokes for a hole, they achieve Even . It’s a moment of equilibrium, where the player’s performance aligns precisely with the course’s design.

Golf Swing Pull With Left Arm or Push With Right.

birdie en bogey

Navigating Challenges: Bogey and Beyond

A Bogey occurs when a golfer completes a hole in one stroke over par. It’s a minor setback, a stumble on the path to perfection. While not a disastrous outcome, it signifies room for improvement.

As the number of strokes surpasses par, golfers encounter the escalating challenges of Double Bogey , Triple Bogey , and Quadruple Bogey . Each increment represents a greater struggle on the course, urging players to regroup and refocus.

The Golf swing left arm dominant: Unraveling the Technique

Pinnacle achievements: birdie, eagle, albatross, condor, hole-in-one.

A Birdie is cause for celebration, earned by completing a hole in one stroke less than par. It reflects skillful play, strategic thinking, and the ability to outperform the course’s expectations.

Achieving an Eagle involves completing a hole two strokes under par. It’s a majestic feat, showcasing a golfer’s mastery over the course and their capability to navigate challenges with finesse.

The Albatross , or Double Eagle , is a rare and remarkable accomplishment in golf. It occurs when a golfer finishes a hole three strokes under par, a testament to extraordinary skill and precision.

A Condor is the stuff of golfing legends. This term is reserved for completing a hole four strokes under par, an exceedingly rare occurrence that few golfers can claim. It’s a mythical marvel, etching the player’s name in golfing history.

The pinnacle of golfing achievement is the Hole-in-One , also known as an Ace . It occurs when a golfer successfully sinks the ball in the cup with just one stroke from the tee. It’s a stroke of perfection, a moment that resonates in the memory of every golfer fortunate enough to experience it.

The Right Foot Back Golf Swing: A Game-Changer.

In the world of golf, each swing tells a story. The scoring terms woven into the fabric of the game add depth and meaning to a golfer’s journey. From the routine strokes to the rare and extraordinary, these terms capture the essence of the sport—a pursuit of excellence, a battle with the course, and the thrill of achieving the seemingly impossible.

As you navigate the golf course, let these scoring terms be your guide, shaping your narrative and adding color to each round. Embrace the challenges, celebrate the victories, and revel in the rich tapestry of golfing moments.

Golf scoring terms denote the number of strokes a player takes on a hole relative to the standard.

Achieving an Albatross, or a score of three strokes under par on a hole, is extremely rare and signifies exceptional skill.

Yes, overall score matters more than individual hole scores. Consistency across the round is crucial for competitive golf.

Scoring an Eagle involves completing a hole two strokes under par, while a Birdie is one stroke under par.

Understanding scoring terms helps players assess their performance, set goals, and refine strategies for a more successful and enjoyable golf experience.

Related Posts

Mastering Downswing in Golf.

Mastering the Downswing in Golf: A Path to Precision and Power.

Downswing in Golf, Golf, with its blend of elegance and…

Gapping Golf

Mastering Gapping Golf: A Comprehensive Guide to Precision in Your Golf Game.

Introduction Mastering Gapping Golf: In the intricate world of golf,…

The Muscles Used in the Golf Swing

The Muscles Used in the Golf Swing: Complete Guide.

Golf is not merely a game of skill; it’s a…

Leave a Comment Cancel reply

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Bogey, Birdie, Eagle and Albatross: How These Terms Add Up on Your Scorecard

Golfer filling out scorecard

  • DESCRIPTION Golfer filling out scorecard
  • SOURCE Icon Sportswire
  • PERMISSION Getty Images License

We’ve all heard the golf scoring terms bogey, birdie, eagle and albatross (okay, maybe you haven’t heard that one) but those outside of the golfing world might not know what they mean. The words are ones you need to know as you learn the game, either on the course or as a casual observer.

It All Starts with Par

Par is probably the golf term most people recognize. From televised tournaments to miniature golf courses, par is seen everywhere.

Par is the number of strokes it likely takes a good golfer to get the ball into the hole. When a golf course is designed, the architect typically decides what is par for each of the 18 holes. Par on most regulation 18-hole courses is almost always three, four or five per hole.

Think of par like zero in mathematics. All numbers – negative or positive – are based around zero. Likewise, all scores in golf are in relation to par.

What is a Bogey in Golf?

We’ll start on the “bad” side of par and explain what a bogey means. A bogey is one stroke over par, so a golfer took one extra shot to get the ball into the hole in relation to par. Two strokes over par is a double bogey, three strokes over par is a triple bogey and anything over that is probably just called an expletive that can’t be mentioned here. You get the picture; there are no fancy names as the strokes increase, it’s simply xxxx-bogey. (For the record, “bogey” is an old-time name for goblin and it certainly feels your game is a little haunted sometimes when shooting all bogeys and above.)

Bogeys are tracked on the scorecard with a square around your score. For example, if you make a 5 on a par-4, you would put a square around the five. For a double bogey, you’d make two squares. For anything worse than a double bogey, make a square around your score and shade it in.

Now on to the “good” side of par, golf scoring that’s for the birds.

What is a Birdie in Golf?

A birdie is when a golfer shoots one stroke under par on a hole. Watch a PGA or LPGA tournament and you will see golfers convert many birdies. A birdie is also a score that is attainable for the average golfer. A good drive, lucky bounce or perfectly placed long putt can result in a birdie every now and then. Birdie is the redeemer in golf, the score that makes a bad day on the course feel like it was worth the effort.

To indicate a birdie on your scorecard, put a circle around your score.

What is an Eagle in Golf?

An eagle – two strokes under par on a hole – is tricky and average golfers could go a lifetime without ever recording one. It takes a very skilled golfer to put the ball into position to record an eagle. Eagles are most often scored on par-5 holes where long hitters can reach the green in two strokes and then sink the ensuing putt. A hole-in-one on a par-3 hole is also an eagle.

Eagles are represented on your scorecard with two circles around the score.

What is an Albatross in Golf?

An albatross in golf is just as spectacular as the bird that is its namesake. An albatross in nature is a flying seabird with the largest wingspan of any bird – up to 11 feet wide. In golf, an albatross is three strokes under par on a hole.

One way for an albatross to occur in golf is when a long-hitting golfer not only drives the green on a short par-4 but also sinks the shot. A golfer can also record an albatross by sinking a second shot on a par-5 hole. Both scenarios are extremely unlikely; the National Hole in One Association estimates the odds of scoring an albatross at 6 million to 1.

PGA Tour veteran Brooks Koepka scored a particularly memorable albatross in 2018 when he holed his second shot at the par-5 sixteenth hole at the Players Championship.

What is a Condor in Golf?

For good measure, there’s also a term for four under par on a single hole. While it may as well be called a unicorn, given the mythical odds, making a hole-in-one on a par-5 is called a condor. And yes, as unbelievable as it may sound, it has happened before .

There are also a handful of par-6 holes on the planet, where holing your second shot would result in a condor.

How it Looks on a Scorecard

Golf scorecard

  • DESCRIPTION Bogey and Bridie symbols on scorecad
  • SOURCE Adapted from Getty Images

If you’ve been tracking your birdies and bogeys with circles and squares on your scorecard, it’ll be easy to tally up your score at the end of the round. Simply add up the squares, subtract the circles, and that’s your score in relation to par. Add that to the par of the course, and that’s your score for the round.

It’s the numbers that ultimately count in golf, but knowing the correct scoring terms earns respect among other golfers and makes understanding the game easier.

The Left Rough

Golf Scorecard Symbols: How to Decipher the Shapes

If you’re new to golf, trying to read a golf scorecard with symbols is like trying to decipher hieroglyphics sometimes with squares above par holes, circles, triangles, and more.

But there’s a reason for the golf scoring symbols you see on a completed scorecard. It helps you quickly differentiate birdies, pars, bogeys and more. 

And if you know how to read the scoring symbols, you can easily tell where you stand during any given round without pulling out the calculator! 

Keep reading to learn more about these symbols and other scorecard best practices in golf.

Golf Scoring Symbols Explained

A golf scorecard is more than just a place to tally up your final score. Some golfers keep net scores, others track which golf clubs they use on certain holes, and others use it for the number of strokes on the greens.

But the symbols might not be as common for every golfer. Here are the most common symbols you will see notated on a golf scorecard.

No Symbol = Par Score

Sometimes no symbols around your score on a hole is a good thing. When you don’t have any geometric shape surrounding your score, that means you made a par. So if you get a four on a par 4, you won’t have anything around your score.

It’s very rare but sometimes you can get a “clean card” which means 18 pars in a golf round. This is very rare even for elite golfers as bogeys and birdies tend to offset. If you do get a clean card, make sure to frame it as it likely won’t happen again. 

Even if you don’t remember much from geometry class, you want to remember that circles in golf are good. A circle around your score means you made a birdie on the hole! The more birdies you can get, the better. 

Two Circles

If you have a score with two circles around the final score, then it’s even better! A double circle means you made an eagle which isn’t very common for the average golfer. But that’s not the only score it could mean.  

A double circle can also mean a hole in one too. If you get the once in a lifetime ace on a par 3, that also results in two circles around your “1.” Like a clean card, make sure you save the ball and frame that scorecard. 

Three Circles

I’ve played golf for a long time and never had the chance to write three circles around a score. Three circles means the very rare double eagle which is also referred to as an albatross. 

The only time this happens is an ace on a par 4 or a two on a par 5. Either way, it’s going to take a miracle shot to make it happen and even more rare than a hole in one. 

Square 

A square isn’t the end of the world and very common for the everyday golfer as it constitutes a bogey on the hole. For example, if your final score on the hole is five on a par 4, your score would receive a square. 

If you’re a “bogey golfer” then you would typically have close to 18 squares during the round. But you could also have a few pars (no symbols) and a few double bogeys as well. 

Two Squares

Speaking of double bogeys, the symbol for that score is two squares. A double bogey is two over on a hole. 

For example, if you make a seven on a par 5, this is a double. Try to avoid these if at all possible as it’s not easy to bounce back from a double bogey. 

Triangle 

A triangle can mean two different terms depending on the app and is a gray area in the history of golf. 

First, a triangle on a golf scorecard means a triple bogey (or worse). 

While you want to avoid squares if possible, they’re pretty common for the everyday golfer. But a symbol you really want to avoid is a triangle.

Conversely, some people use a triangle symbol to represent an ace as well. I’ve never understood this because an ace is really an eagle on a par 3, which is two circles.

Dots on a Golf Scorecard Explained

If you play in a tournament that has a gross and net division it’s not uncommon to see dots as well. A dot on the hole means you get a stroke for the net division.  

For example, let’s say you’re a 12 handicap golfer. 

On the hardest 12 holes (each hole has a rank from 1-18, hard to the easiest on the scorecard) you would get a dot. This is reflected in the net score for the hole. 

So if you have a dot on the hole and make a five on a par 4, the dot means you get a stroke on the hole. Your gross score of five is now a net four. 

If you have a handicap higher than 18 you will have two dots on certain holes. This will remove two strokes off your net score.

For example, if you’re a 22 handicap golfer you will get one dot on the 14 easiest holes and two dots on the hardest four holes. So if you make a 6 on a two dot hole, your net score will be a four.

Golf Symbols for Scores

Golf Scorecard Scoring on Apps 

If you’re the type of golfer who prefers to keep score on a golf app, there might be some differences to the traditional symbols. For example, Golf Pad GPS changes a few symbols.

While a par remains no symbol, a solid circle means an eagle (or better) as opposed to two circles. While a solid square means a double bogey (or worse). There are no triangles either on most golf apps.

3 Scorecard Tips 

Now that you have a better understanding of a scorecard, let’s get into a few best practices. 

1. Use a Scorecard Holder 

The biggest thing with a scorecard is to make sure you don’t lose it! When you’re riding in a golf cart, make sure to keep the scorecard secure on the steering wheel (and the pencil too).

If you’re using a pushcart , make sure to keep the scorecard clipped in or inside one of the secure pouches. If you’re walking and carrying your golf bag, buy a scorecard holder or keep it inside a yardage guide if you have one. 

2. Use an App

If you want to track your statistics and/or don’t want to depend on someone else keeping your score, use an app. There are tons of apps for all types of phones to easily track your scores and more. This is also a good idea to use when it’s raining and the scorecard might get wet too.  Here’s our list of favorite golf apps .

3. Don’t Add Up the Scores 

Finally, please make sure to not be the golfer that adds up a score after 9 or 17 holes. Whenever someone does this and announces it to the group, it only adds extra pressure and expectation for the rest of the round.

Knowing your score leads to golfers thinking too much and often letting their mind drift. I’ve seen so many players have a great 9 or 17 holes only to collapse down the stretch. Wait until the final putt drops to add up the score. 

Other Golf Scorecard Features 

While each scorecard is unique based on the course, there are some other features on all cards like the hole number.

Tee Boxes/Distance

Each golf course will display the multiple sets of tee boxes and length for each hole. Most golf courses have at least three sets of tees while others have 5-6 tee boxes. This ensures that there is a tee box for every type of golfer. 

The hardest tee boxes are the longest ones and are notated at the top of the scorecard (these are known as the tips). While the shortest set of tees are lowest on the scorecard.

Additionally, sometimes courses have a “combo” set of tees where golfers play certain holes of one tee box and others from a different tee. A good example of this is a male golfer playing the blue/white combo. They would typically play the white tees on longer holes and blue tees on shorter holes. 

Always play the appropriate tee box for your handicap index!

Slope Rating and Course Rating

On the left side of the scorecard next to the tee box color is the slope rating of the course. This is often something like 74.1/139. 

These numbers refer to the average score for a scratch golfer and the slope is based on a sliding scale for bogey golfers. 

You can learn more about slope rating here .

Par of Hole 

Every golf scorecard will also have the par on the hole (typically a 3, 4, or 5). While some golf courses have a par 6, this is extremely uncommon.

Additionally, some holes will have a 4/5 as the par depending on the player and/or tee box. For example, if a man is playing the hole it’s a par 4 but if a woman is playing the same tee box, it’s a par 5.

Most full-length golf courses are par 72 while there are some that are 70, 71, and rarely, a par 73. While shorter, executive style golf courses are much less. 

Handicap Index

The last line before the boxes is the handicap index for the hole. All holes are ranked between 1-18, with one being the hardest and 18 being the easiest golf hole. 

The handicap of each hole is also important as it factors in with gambling games where you need to give strokes to fellow players. For example, if you are giving a player 10 strokes, they would get a stroke on the 10 hardest holes (not just any 10 holes). 

Their handicap score would be -1 of their gross score (these are known as net scores).

Signature and Attest

Most golf course scorecards will also have a place for the scorekeeper and player to sign the card. If you’re playing in a formal golf tournament, each card must have two signatures or the scorecard is invalid and that player is disqualified.

Do not forget to sign your scorecard after the round or your score doesn’t count! 

Local Rules 

Lastly, it’s common for scorecards to also have local rules for the course as well. These are rules specific to the golf course and might include things like:

  • Local water hazard rules
  • Any ball outside the roads is out of bounds
  • All golf balls in flower beds get free (and mandatory) relief

FAQs About Golf Scorecard Symbols 

Do you have more questions about circles and squares on a golf scorecard? If so, keep reading to learn more and improve your golf game knowledge.

What is a triangle on a golf scorecard? 

A triangle can mean two different things in golf. 

Some players use a triangle to represent a triple bogey or worse on a hole. While others use it to represent an ace.

What are the dots on a golf scorecard? 

Dots on a scorecard are related to your golf handicap . It’s common to see dots in golf tournaments with net scoring. 

How do you read a golf scorecard? 

A golf scorecard has all kinds of things including spots for your names, scores, par of each hole, slope/rating, and more. Once you add your score, you have the option to use symbols to 

What are the 7 golf scoring terms? 

The seven most common scoring terms include eagle, birdie, par, bogey, double bogey, triple bogey and a hole in one. Other terms include albatross, condor, snowman (quadruple bogey) and countless others.  Learn all the golf scoring names here.

What happens if you sign the wrong scorecard?

Bad news if you sign the wrong scorecard! 

If you sign the scorecard with a higher score, you have to accept the mistake but luckily, you don’t get disqualified. However, if you sign a scorecard that is lower than your score, you are disqualified from the event. 

This is why it’s crucial to track your score during the round and double-check the hole by hole score before signing it. 

What is the C word in golf? 

The “C” word in golf is usually referred to as choking. While the “S” word stands for shank and the “Y” word stands for the  yips .

I’d suggest keeping these three words from your vocabulary to not put a jinx on any of your playing partners. 

What is a kitty in golf? 

Kitty refers to the total money won at the end of the round. To learn more about common terms and phrases in golf  click here . 

Final Thoughts on Golf Scorecards

Hopefully you have a better understanding of the symbols of a golf scorecard.

While these symbols are helpful to add up your score easier, don’t feel like you need to do them. If you use a golf app or use the scorecard in your golf cart GPS, they tend to make the symbols for you. 

Leave a Comment Cancel Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

spain

BRITISH OPEN

Scoring in golf: What is a birdie, eagle, albatross, bogey, etc.?

When enjoying a round of golf, hearing the names of each score can be as interesting as the play, but have you ever considered how they came to be.

When enjoying a round of golf, hearing the names of each score can be as interesting as the play, but have you ever considered how they came to be?

One of the enjoyable aspects of golf is the experience of hearing the scores being announced. The terms used, such as birdie, bogey, and par, have become widely recognized in the English language beyond the context of golf. The origin of these words is just as fascinating as their meaning.

Let’s begin by discussing the term “bogey.” The term “Bogey Man” is known for its convoluted origin. It refers to a mythic or unseen person or entity. The term “ground score” was coined by Mr. Hugh Rotherham, Secretary of the Coventry Golf Club , to refer to the concept of standardizing the number of shots that a skilled golfer should ideally take at each hole.

The barranca bites back. Dustin Johnson cards a quad on No. 2. #USOpen pic.twitter.com/naWYKQETQZ — U.S. Open (USGA) (@usopengolf) June 16, 2023

The idea quickly became popular at the Great Yarmouth Club, where the golfer who provided the “ground score” was known as the Bogey Man. This led to other clubs in Britain adopting the term “bogey” to refer to this ground score.

During the early 20th century, golf experienced significant growth in the United States. This expansion led to two simultaneous developments that brought about substantial changes in the game. One notable development was the growing professionalization of the players . It was no longer just a casual pastime for the upper classes; players began dedicating their energy to improving their game.

The second aspect mentioned is the characteristic of industrialization that is commonly associated with the United States . The advancements in club and ball manufacturing have the potential to help professional players achieve consistently lower scores.

Jon Rahm rolls it in for EAGLE from 42 feet out on the 6th! 🔥 📺: Golf Channel and @peacock pic.twitter.com/JuxLT3L5OA — Golf Channel (@GolfChannel) April 28, 2023

Golf clubs in the US adjusted their ground score to be one stroke lower than the outdated “bogey” score, recognizing that it was no longer accurate for the modern game. The term “par” was borrowed from Latin, meaning “equal” or “like,” by American golf courses . Originally used in the stock exchange to refer to the face value of a share, it was adopted to describe the ground score in golf. Additionally, American golf courses coined the term “bogey” to refer to a score that is over par, causing some tension with their British counterparts.

By the end of the 20th century, after the conclusion of two world wars, the longstanding rivalry had diminished and American terms gained global recognition.

The term “Birdie” has an interesting origin. It originated from American slang in the early 20th century, where it was used to describe something that is excellent. When something was considered a remarkable accomplishment, it was commonly referred to as “bird”. An interesting instance of an Americanism being embraced by the press across the Atlantic is the term “birdie,” which came to signify a hole completed in one stroke under par.

I always feel an albatross is the greatest feat in golf, better than an ace (unless it’s a par 4). You’re given 5 shots to secure a par & you do it in 2, it’s awesome! Kudos to the 🇺🇸 announcer who called it such! To the double 🦅 guy (take notes 😉) pic.twitter.com/lJMTQGQzZL — Luke Elvy (@Luke_Elvy) January 22, 2023

In golf, there is a scoring term called an eagle, which is a hole played one stroke better than a birdie. The eagle is considered a more impressive achievement, and in American culture, it is associated with a sense of majesty. After the concept of the birdie gained popularity, it didn’t take long for the term “eagle” to be widely recognized as well.

The concept of the double-eagle was further developed by the Americans, representing a hole that was played three under par. However, the British responded with their own variation at this stage. In the United States, the term “double-eagle” is commonly used to describe a three-under hole. However, in most other parts of the world, the British term “Albatross” is widely adopted to refer to this impressive achievement. The name “Albatross” is given to one of the rarest achievements in golf, which is even more uncommon than scoring an eagle .

The four-under-par shot, known as the Condor, is extremely rare and often considered mythical in nature.

A condor is golf's rarest shot. This East Bay man may have just gotten the only 2-shot condor in United States golf history. https://t.co/30npXaL8yI #mercnews @NCGA1901 #PGA @lakechabotgolf pic.twitter.com/wDdu1LM7n2 — Jon Becker (@JonBecker28) January 12, 2021

Golf Scoring Term: Par, Bogey, Birdie, Eagle and More

Golf Scoring Term

Are you a beginner golfer trying to wrap your head around all of the lingo? Scoring terminology can be one of the most confusing topics for golfers. From birdies to bogies, there are lots of terms that every golfer needs to know. In this blog post, we’ll cover some essential scoring vocabulary and what it means on the course. So get ready to hit the links feeling more confident in your understanding of golf scoring terminology!

Read more: Golf Foursomes Guide : How Does It Work?

Table of Contents

What Are The Common Terms Used In Golf Scoring?

Score: This is the total number of shots a golfer has taken to get their ball into the hole (a round of golf consists of 18 holes). A score can be expressed in either gross or net.

Gross Score: The total number of strokes taken by a golfer on each hole, with no allowances for handicaps. For example, if a golfer scored 5 on the first hole, 4 on the second and so on, their gross score would be 73.

Net Score: A net score is calculated by subtracting any handicap allowance from the golfer’s gross score. For example, if a player with a 16 handicap shot a gross score of 74, their net score would be 58.

Par : This is the number of shots an average golfer should take to get their ball into the hole. The par for each hole can vary, but a standard round of golf usually has a par of 72 (which means 18 holes with a par 4).

Bogey : A bogey is a single stroke above par. So if a golfer takes 5 shots to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored a bogey.

Double Bogey: A double bogey is two strokes above par. So if a golfer takes 6 shots to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored a double bogey.

Triple Bogey: A triple bogey is three strokes above par. So if a golfer takes 7 shots to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored a triple bogey.

Quadruple Bogey: A quadruple bogey is four strokes above par. So if a golfer takes 8 shots to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored a quadruple bogey.

Birdie : A birdie is a single stroke under par, so if a golfer takes 3 shots to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored a birdie.

Eagle : An eagle is two strokes under par. So if a golfer takes 2 shots to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored an eagle.

Albatross /Double Eagle: An albatross is three strokes under par. So if a golfer takes 1 shot to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored an albatross.

Condor: A condor is four strokes under par. So if a golfer takes 0 shots to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored a condor.

Ace/Hole in One : An ace is a shot made from the tee into the hole with one stroke. A golfer with an ace on a par 4 has scored a hole-in-one.

Scorecard: A scorecard is used to record each player’s score for each hole. It also includes information such as the course, par for each hole, number of holes played, and other important information. The scorecard is used to track a golfer’s progress over time.

Stableford Points: Stableford points are awarded based on a golfer’s performance in relation to par on each hole. For each stroke taken under or above par, a golfer earns points. These points are tallied up at the end of the round and used to rank players in competitions and tournaments.

Handicap: A handicap is an indication of a golfer’s playing level, relative to other golfers. It is calculated using the scores from previous rounds and is used to give every player an equal chance in tournaments and competitions. A lower handicap indicates a better player, while a higher handicap indicates a less experienced golfer.

What Are The Difference Between Even-Par, Under-Par, and Over-Par Scores?

Golf Scoring Terms

Golf Scoring Term

A player can earn different types of scores based on their performance on the course. These scores include even-par, under-par, and over-par, and they provide insight into how well a player performed compared to the expected level of play.

When a golfer scores even-par, it means they have completed the course in the expected number of strokes. For example, if a golfer completes a par-72 course with a score of 72, they have achieved an even-par score. This is considered a solid performance, as the golfer has met the expected level of play.

An under-par score is achieved when a golfer completes the course in fewer strokes than expected. For example, if a golfer completes a par-72 course with a score of 69, they have achieved an under-par score of 3. This is a highly desirable score, as it indicates the golfer has performed better than expected.

An over-par score is earned when a golfer completes the course in more strokes than expected. For example, if a golfer completes a par-72 course with a score of 76, they have earned an over-par score of 4. This is a less desirable score, as it indicates the golfer has performed worse than expected.

It’s important to note that the par for a course can vary depending on the course’s difficulty level, so a score of even-par, under-par, or over-par may have different meanings from course to course. Additionally, different golf tournaments may have different expectations for player scores based on factors such as weather conditions or course setup.

How To Calculate Your Golf Score Using A Simple Formula?

Calculating your golf score may seem intimidating at first, but it’s actually quite simple. Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to calculate your golf score using a simple formula:

Determine the par for the course: The first step in calculating your golf score is to determine the par for the course you’re playing. Par is the number of strokes a skilled golfer should take to complete a hole or a course.

  • Keep track of your strokes: Throughout the game, keep track of the number of strokes you take on each hole. Write it down on a scorecard or use a golf GPS app to track your shots.
  • Subtract the par from your total strokes: Once you’ve completed the round, subtract the total number of strokes you took from the par of the course. This will give you your score for the round.
  • For example, let’s say you played a round on a par-72 course and you took 90 strokes. To calculate your score, simply subtract 72 from 90: 90 – 72 = 18. Your score for the round is 18 over par.

Strokes – Handicap adjustment = Scores

You can even use this formula to compare different rounds and find out which course you perform better on. Just remember to always subtract any handicaps before you divide, and your golf score will be accurate every time.

You can learn about how to calculate golf Handicaps in the article: What Are Golf Handicaps? Meaning & How To Calculate

Final Thoughts

Understanding golf scoring terms is an important part of gameplay. Increasing your knowledge of these terms enhances your overall performance on the course and can help you become a better golfer. Whether you are a beginner or an experienced player, it is essential to know the proper terminology for strokes, pars, birdies and bogeys.

Taking the time to brush up on golf scoring terms will benefit not just your game but also the way that other players perceive your play. As shown in this blog post, having a deep understanding of golf rules and their associated terminology can help you make smarter decisions during gameplay which could ultimately propel you to have more consistent lower scores.

Alvin Daniel

Hello everyone, I'm Alvin Daniel. I was born in the Philippines and came to the United States when I was 16 years old. I started playing golf at that age and have loved it ever since. I turned professional when I was 21 and have been working as a golf instructor and guide ever since. My goal is to help everyone know more about this great game of golf. And, hopefully, through my instruction, they can improve their skills and enjoy the game even more.

View all posts

What Is a Good Score in Golf? How Much In 18 Holes & 9 Holes

Four ball golf: rules, strategies & how it works in match and stroke play, related posts, what is a hole out in golf, why is golf so popular the reasons why, how to golf swing like pro golfers: guidelines..., what is a mulligan in golf & where..., 10+ golf betting sites & apps update 2023, what is a links golf course definition &..., what is a bogey in golf definition &..., what is an albatross in golf definition &..., what are golf handicaps meaning & golf handicap..., what is an eagle in golf meaning &..., leave a comment cancel reply.

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Clean Strike Golf Logo

  • The Golf Swing
  • Equipment Reviews

What are the scores in golf called?

With so many different names for the scores in golf, it can seem incredibly confusing. But scoring in golf is actually quite simple. In this article we’ll go through how it works and what the different scores are called.

The most common golf format, the one that’s on TV almost every week, is called stroke play (a stroke is just another name for a shot). It’s actually really simple.

What are the scores in golf called?

In professional golf, competitors play 18 holes (a full course) each day for 4 days (for a total of 72 holes). Whichever golfer has played in the least number of shots wins. Easy!

But where it gets more confusing is in the names of the scores on each hole. There’s a name for each score, which depends on the par of the hole.

What is a par in golf?

The best place to start is with the term “par”. You’ve probably heard it used before, for example: “I’m not feeling up to par today”. Par is considered the desired score, hence why “not feeling up to par” can be used to mean “not feeling very well”.

Basically, there are three types of hole in golf:

On a par 3 hole, the player is expected to take 3 shots, on a par 4 it’s 4 shots, and on a par 5 it’s 5. Simple, right? Bear in mind that the par system is based on professional golf scores, not amatuers or average club golfers.

Pro golfer

It may seem like these numbers are plucked out of thin air but they’re not. The par of a hole is actually based on the number of shots required to reach the green.

And then, a player is given 2 putts on the green to get the ball in the hole. That’s 1 putt to get the ball near the hole, and 1 more to get it in.

So if it’s possible to reach the green in 1 shot, it’s a par 3 hole. This is because once on the green, the player is expected to take 2 putts. So in total, that’s 1 approach shot, and 2 putts, for a par 3.

What is a par in golf?

A par 4 is a longer hole. They’re generally not reachable in 1 shot (unless the player can hit the ball a long way). Because of the length of the hole, the player is expected to get the ball on the green in 2 shots rather than 1. So that’s 2 shots to get onto the green and then 2 putts for a total of 4 shots on a par 4.

And a par 5 is an even longer hole. These are generally not reachable in 2 shots (except by big hitters). On a par 5 a player is allotted 3 shots to reach the green. Combined with 2 putts on the green, that makes the 5 shots of a par 5.

Golfer playing long hole

In reality, it doesn’t matter how the player makes the score, a 5 on a par 5 is still a par. The player may have hit the ball in the trees, on the driving range, onto the car park, and into a bunker before hitting the sand shot into the hole. It would still count as a par.

What is the par of a golf course?

As well as the score on each hole, “par” is also used to refer to the expected score for the entire course. For example, many golf courses are a par 72. Remember, this is the number of shots a professional is expected to take, not an amateur golfer.

Almost every course consists of 18 holes made of par 3s, par 4s, and par 5s. But depending on how many of each hole the particular course has, will depend on the overall par of that course.

What is the par of a golf course?

So if an 18 hole course had only par 3 holes, it would be a par 54 (18 holes x par 3). On the other hand, if an 18 hole course had only par 5s, it would be a par 90 (18 holes x par 5). In reality, practically every course has a mix of par 3s, par 4s, and par 5s. But hopefully that helps to explain the par of a course.

Why is it called par in golf?

Many people reasonably assume that the term “par” comes from golf. But in fact, it doesn’t, it actually comes from the stock exchange.

“Par” used to be used to describe whether a stock was above or below it’s normal value, which was known as “the par”. A stock could be described as being under par or over par, depending on how it was performing.

Stock exchange

In 1870, a reporter called A H Doleman was thought to be the first person to apply the term “par” to golf. At the time, there was no way to refer to the average number of shots a professional golfer took on a particular course (or how many shots should be taken on each hole).

Today, for example, we may say that a particular course is a par 71. But at that time, this didn’t exist.

The story goes that Mr Doleman was covering The Open at Prestwick in 1870. At the time it was the biggest tournament in golf, and it still is one of the four majors. Back then, The Open was always held on the 12 hole course at Prestwick, and the trophy was known as “The Belt” (today the trophy is the “Claret Jug”).

Mr Doleman approached 2 professionals, Davie Strath and Jamie Anderson, and asked them what score would win The Belt. They told him that a score of 49 would be a perfect round, and would be a victorious score. Mr Doleman declared this the “par” of the course.

Why is it called par in golf?

The golfer Young Tom Morris would go on to win The Open with a score of 2 over par for 3 rounds (36 holes). From that moment on, the term “par” was adopted and has been used ever since.

What is a birdie in golf?

Now we know what a par is, it should be fairly easy to understand what a birdie is. A birdie is simply 1 shot under par on any hole. This is a good thing, it’s actually better than a par.

So, there are 3 different ways you can make a birdie. It can be done on a par 3, a par 4, or a par 5.

  • A score of 2 on a par 3 is a birdie
  • A score of 3 on a par 4 is a birdie
  • A score of 4 on a par 5 is a birdie

What is a birdie in golf?

In general, the longer the hole, the easier it is to make a birdie. This may sound counter-intuitive but let me explain why.

On many par 5s, pro golfers can actually reach the green in 2 shots. This means there’s many times where they get 2 putts for a birdie, instead of having to putt it in 1.

Likewise, many par 4 holes can be reached in just 1 shot. This again gives the golfer 2 putts for the birdie.

But on a par 3, the best you can do is to get the ball on the green in 1 shot. That then requires you to make the putt in 1 for the birdie. That’s why a birdie on a par 3 is quite rare, although it does happen.

It’s true that many club golfers can’t hit the ball far enough to reach a par 5 in 2 shots or a par 4 in 1 shot. But, that doesn’t mean they can’t make some nice birdie opportunities. Often, they can get close to the green for their final approach, giving them a chance to get the ball close to the hole for a birdie. They sometimes hit a really got shot on a par 3 too – setting up a nice birdie putt!

Why is it called a birdie?

There is no definite proof of the origins of the word “birdie”. However, there is a commonly held belief that it originated at The Atlantic City Club, USA in 1903.

The story goes that a group of 3 or 4 locals were playing a money match at the club. One of the them was a gentleman called Abner Smith, or Ab Smith for short. He hit a shot close to the hole, setting up a putt for a score of 1 under par on the hole. Ab declared it a “bird” of a shot, which at the time was a slang word for “cool”.

Why is it called a birdie?

The group agreed that next time a player scored 1 under par on a hole, they would receive double money. Ab proceeded to hole the putt, and so the first birdie was made!

Following this event, a score of 1 under par on any hole would become referred to as a “birdie”. The term soon spread across America and Canada, before reaching the UK. Now, of course, it’s well known across the world. I think we owe a thanks to Mr Abner Smith, I’ll dedicate my next birdie to the man!

What is an eagle in golf?

An eagle is a score of 2 under par on 1 hole. As with a birdie, an eagle can be scored on any hole including a par 3, par 4, or a par 5.

  • A score of 1 on a par 3 is an eagle
  • A score of 2 on a par 4 is an eagle
  • A score of 3 on a par 5 is an eagle

What is an eagle in golf?

Eagles also tend to be more common on the longer holes. In order to score an eagle on a par 3, the player has to get a hole in one! For this reason, an eagle on a par 3 is very rare and is almost never referred to an eagle but rather a hole in one or an ace.

Whereas on a short par 4, many big hitters can reach the green in one shot, setting up a putt or a chip for an eagle 2. Likewise, many players can reach a par 5 in 2 shots, giving themself a putt or short shot for an eagle 3.

Why is it called an eagle?

Ab Smith, the same golfer that is credited with coining the term “birdie”, is also thought to have coined the term “eagle” at the same golf club – The Atlantic City Club. It wasn’t long after the “birdie” was born that the “eagle” came into existance.

To be fair, it seems like a logical name. If a score of 1 under is called a birdie then a score of 2 under should probably be named after a rare bird. The eagle seems like a great choice – it’s rare and majestic, just like the score.

Why is it called an eagle?

And just like birdie, the term has American origins. In fact, it wasn’t adopted in common usage in the UK until quite a while later. One of the earliest recorded uses of the term in the UK was in 1919, over 10 years after it came into use in America. But now it’s used by practically every golfer across the world!

What is an albatross in golf?

In golf, an albatross is something very rare, just the like the bird itself! It’s the name given to a score of 3 under par on a signle hole. An albatross can only be scored on a par 4 or a par 5. That’s because it’s not possible to score lower than 1 on a par 3 (which would be an eagle)!

  • A score of 1 on a par 4 is an albatross
  • A score of 2 on a par 5 is an albatross

 What is an albatross in golf?

You can tell just how rare an albatross is since it requires a hole in one in a par 4 or a hole in 2 on a par 5. Not many par 4s can even be reached in 1 shot. More golfers tend to be able to reach par 5s in 2, making it a bit more likely on a par 5. But either way, an albatross is something that very few golfers ever achieve.

What is a double eagle?

A double eagle is another name for an albatross. In fact, it is thought that the term “double eagle” actually came before the term “albatross”.

Legend has it that the amateur golfer Ab Smith from The Atlantic City Club in the USA introduced the term “double eagle”. This is the same golfer that is credited with introducing the terms “birdie” and “eagle”.

What is a double eagle?

Along with his regular playing partners, they had different terms for all the different under par scores in golf. 3 under par was no different, it became known as a double eagle.

Why is it called a double eagle?

The term may seem strange. An eagle in 2 under and a double eagle is 3 under, which is not double. However, there may well be some sense behind it.

When Ab Smith and his playing partners devised the terms, they were playing money matches. In these matches, a birdie (1 under) earned double money, and an eagle (2 under) earned double again. So it would make sense that a score of 3 under would earn double an eagle. Hence the name, “double eagle”!

Why is it called a double eagle?

Although the term may make sense in a money match, it doesn’t seem to make much sense in a regular game of golf. In fact, the term is only really used in the USA these days. In the rest of the world, the term “albatross” is generally preferred.

Why is it called an Albatross?

Just as an eagle is rare bird, an albatross is an even rarer bird. It would seem a logical step to name a score of 3 under par after a rarer bird than an eagle.

It’s not entirely clear when the term came into use. The first reference to it was found in a newspaper in South Africa in 1931 where a golfer scored a hole-in-one on the par 4 18th at Durban Country Club. The newspaper made reference to this score being known as an “albatross” amongst golfers.

Why is it called an Albatross?

However, it is thought that the term was in common usage among golfers for quite a while before this. Although it’s generally accepted that the alternative name “double eagle” came first.

Is an albatross better than a hole-in-one?

In terms of rarity, an albatross is actually rarer than a hole-in-one. That’s because the vast majority of hole-in-ones happen on a par 3, and are classed as eagles. Since par 3s are reachable in 1 shot, making a hole in one on these holes is much more likely.

But for a hole-in-one to count as an albatross, it has to happen on a par 4. Most golfers can’t even reach a par 4 in 1 shot! So in that sense, an albatross is more difficult (and better) than a hole-in-one.

However, not all albatrosses are a hole-in-one. An albatross can be made in 2 shots on a par 5. Although this is rarer than a hole-in-one, I think most golfers would rather make a hole-in-one given the choice!

Is an albatross better than a hole-in-one?

Either way, an albatross is an incredible acheivement and something that any golfer should be proud of.

What is a condor in golf?

A condor in golf is something so rare that not many golfers even know it exists. It is the name given to a score of 4 under par on just one hole! It can only be acheieved on one type of hole and it requires a hole-in-one!

  • A condor is a score of 1 on a par 5

That’s right, a condor can only be acheived by making a hole-in-one on a par 5! Most golfers cannot reach a par 5 in 2 shots, let alone 1! This makes a condor not only unlikely but almost impossible!

What is a condor in golf?

Even professional golfers cannot reach par 5 holes in 1 shot! So under normal circumstances, a condor requires an extraordinary amount of luck.

The most likely way for a condor to happen is on a par 5 hole with a sharp dogleg. In golf, a dogleg is basically a hole that has a sharp angle to it, which can even be as much as a right angle!

Other factors that may make it possible include a dangerously strong helping wind or a dangerously steep and long hill!

Or maybe a cart path could come in handy?!

Golf cart

On some of these holes, it’s possible for the golfer to drive the ball over the corner of the dogleg. So even though the hole may be 510 yards on the scorecard, it could be just 310 yards in a straight line. Not that it’s a short hit though! A drive of the highest calibre is still required, as well as a great deal of luck for it to find the hole!

Has there ever been a condor on the PGA Tour?

So unlikely is a condor that one has never been made in professional golf! In fact, there are only 5 recorded condors in the whole of golf!

The first known condor was thought to have been made by Larry Bruce in 1962 at Hope Country Club in the USA. It was a 480 yard par 5 dogleg right and he took his drive across the corner. 480 yards may seem like a short par 5 by modern standards but back in 1962 that was a very long hole!

Has there ever been a condor on the PGA Tour?

There have been 4 verified condors since then but none have been recorded in professional golf. The main problem is that professional courses are designed to be very difficult. Virtually no condor opportunities exist in professional golf, barring some extraordinary luck of course.

Maybe one day a gale force wind will blow a ball 400 yards onto a cart path, before rolling down a steep hill and falling into the hole. It’s possible!

What is a bogey in golf?

A bogey is the name for a score of 1 over par on a hole. Unlike a birdie, eagle, albatross, or condor, a bogey is generally considered a poor score. Since the golfer is supposed to make a par on average, a bogey is generally considered as losing a shot or “dropping a shot”.

What is a bogey in golf?

Having said that, there can still be such thing as a”good bogey”. If a hole is particularly tough, doesn’t suit the player, or they’ve gotten themselves in trouble, than a bogey could be considered a good score. Of course, there are many scores worse than 1 over!

Where did bogey come from in golf?

The term “bogey” wasn’t actually originally used to mean a score of one over par. “Bogey” was actually the name of the first stroke play system.

Where did bogey come from in golf?

Even though from 1870 the term “par” was used for the expected total score on a course, there was no equivalent for each hole. Whereas as today we have a par on each hole (eg par 5), nothing of the sort existed. There was only a par for the entire course.

But in 1890, Mr Hugh Rotherham revolutionised the scoring system. He was Secretary of the Coventry Golf Club when he proposed a “par” for each hole. But this wasn’t to be known as the “par of the hole” until much later. Mr Rotherham instead called it the “ground score”, presumably to distinguish it from the “par score” which was the course total.

Other golf clubs adopted the idea and started using it during match play. It is thought that the term “bogey” was first used at The Great Yarmoth Club in the UK. The story goes that a Mr CA Wellman remarked to Dr Browne that “this player of yours is a regular bogey man”.

At the time, there was a popular song called “Hush, Hush, Hush, Here Comes the Bogeyman”. It referred to a popular mythical tale that parents used to tell children. They would threaten them that the “bogeyman” (some kind of ghost/monster) would come in their sleep if they didn’t behave. Nice huh?!

The Bogeyman

Presumably, Mr Rotherham used the phrase to mean that the golfer was so good he was scary? I guess if a golfer could keep scoring well on every hole they would be scarily good. Either way, from then on the term “bogey” became used to mean the “par” of a hole, instead of “ground score”.

This may sound confusing but stick with mem things get simpler!

Why is it called a bogey in golf?

Over time, the term “bogey” changed it’s meaning. It’s not entirely clear why the meaning changed but it seems to have started with the American Women’s golf association.

From 1893, they began working on a handicap system which would be adopted by the Men’s golf association shortly after. Instead of using the term “bogey” for the score on each hole, they used the term “par”, which had previously only been used for the course total.

Golf tee

This seemed to make sense though. The idea was to have a “par” for each hole, which then totals a “par” for the course. And so the scoring system as we know it today was born. Thank you to the American Women’s golf association for simplifying things!

From then on, the term “bogey” was no longer needed. But clearly, it stuck around. We don’t really know why, but it then became used to mean a score of 1 over par.

Presumably “bogey” had been used so much in golf that it had to find a new home. Also, it seems to make more sense for a bad score, since a bogeyman is not exactly a good thing!

What is a double bogey?

A double bogey is a score of 2 over par on a hole. It’s called a double bogey because it’s twice as far over par as a bogey. It’s not the most inventive name but it serves a purpose.

Is a double bogey good?

A double bogey is almost never considered a good score by a professional golfer. But for an amateur, it’s possible that it could be a good score for them. Of course, this depends on their ability and difficulty of the particular hole.

What is a double bogey?

It may seem strange that there isn’t a special name for a score of 2 over par. But presumably that’s because unlike a birdie, eagle, or albatross, a double bogey is generally not considered something special.

What is worse than a double bogey?

After a double bogey, which is 2 over par, there’s a triple bogey, which is 3 over par. Again, not a very imaginative name but not many golfers want to shout about a double bogey anyway!

After a triple bogey, the scores don’t really have names. But 4 over par is sometimes called a quadruple bogey. There’s also something else – a snowman.

What is worse than a double bogey?

A score of 8 on a hole is affectionately (tongue-in-cheek) known as a snowman. In professional golf, a snowman is generally the highest (worst) score that a player will make. It doesn’t happen often at the top of the game but it happens all the time amongst regular club golfers.

Final thoughts on the scores in golf…

The names for the scores in golf are quite strange and I think they make scoring seem more confusing than it is. I’ve even learnt a few things myself doing research for this article.

But I think it’s important to consider that golf is a very old game. So much like the English language (and other languages), the words have evolved over time.

Golfers

Golfers definitely have their own language and we’ve only just scratched the surface. But hopefully this article shows that golf isn’t that complicated or intimidating really. It’s just unique! And that’s not a bad thing in my view.

Tom Rothwell from Clean Strike Golf

I’m Tom Rothwell and I’m a 3 handicaper that's obsessed with golf. You can often find me hitting balls on a driving range somewhere!

I'm on a journey to learn as much as possible about the great game. I've made Clean Strike Golf to share everything I discover along the way.

Latest Articles

birdie en bogey

Long Thumb vs Short Thumb Golf Grip

The grip is discussed a lot in golf. But what isn't mentioned very often is the "long thumb" vs "short...

The grip is discussed a lot in golf. But what isn't mentioned very often is the "long thumb" vs "short...

birdie en bogey

What is a texas scramble in golf?

What is a Texas scramble? A Texas scrample is a golf format that typically involves a team of 4 players....

Texas scramble

Why do golfers earn so much?

Do pro golfers make good money? It's no secret that the world's best golfers earn a lot of money. However,...

Do pro golfers make good money? It's no secret that the world's best golfers earn a lot of money. However,...

Tiger Woods

Drawing irons but slicing driver

Why do I draw my irons and slice my driver? This may seem like a very strange problem to have...

birdie en bogey

  • Cast & crew
  • User reviews

Birdie & Bogey

Janine Turner, Mike Norris, and Amanda Alch in Birdie & Bogey (2004)

A 12 year old gets cancer. She becomes a fighter, not only for herself but her father as well. It will tear the faith of both of them and their mother as well. A 12 year old gets cancer. She becomes a fighter, not only for herself but her father as well. It will tear the faith of both of them and their mother as well. A 12 year old gets cancer. She becomes a fighter, not only for herself but her father as well. It will tear the faith of both of them and their mother as well.

  • Mike Norris
  • Chris Bessey
  • Janine Turner
  • Carey Scott
  • 2 User reviews
  • 2 Critic reviews

Birdie And Bogey

  • Danny O'Conner

Carey Scott

  • Lester Stillman

Amanda Alch

  • Birdie O'Conner

Sheree J. Wilson

  • Dr. Carroll

Bill Poague

  • Tony Templeman

Kevin Downes

  • Zach Cornell

Demi Baumann

  • (as Kenny Baumann)
  • Hospital Visitor

Alin Bijan

  • Sport Agent
  • Photographer
  • Golf Caddie
  • All cast & crew
  • Production, box office & more at IMDbPro

More like this

Taking the Reins

Did you know

  • Soundtracks When the Joy Shines Through My Eyes Written by 'Jolie Holliday', 'Dave Innis', 'Amin Emam' Performed by 'Jolie Holliday'

User reviews 2

  • Aug 29, 2017
  • October 28, 2004 (United States)
  • United States
  • Birdie and Bogey
  • Dallas, Texas, USA
  • Norris Family Films
  • See more company credits at IMDbPro

Technical specs

  • Runtime 1 hour 40 minutes

Related news

Contribute to this page.

Janine Turner, Mike Norris, and Amanda Alch in Birdie & Bogey (2004)

  • See more gaps
  • Learn more about contributing

More to explore

Production art

Recently viewed

  • Election 2024
  • Entertainment
  • Photography
  • Press Releases
  • Israel-Hamas War
  • Russia-Ukraine War
  • Latin America
  • Middle East
  • Asia Pacific
  • AP Top 25 College Football Poll
  • Movie reviews
  • Book reviews
  • Financial Markets
  • Business Highlights
  • Financial wellness
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Social Media

Chris Kirk takes Kapalua lead with final birdie. A dozen players are lined up behind him

Chris Kirk walks off the 18th green after his round during the third round of The Sentry golf event, Saturday, Jan. 6, 2024, at Kapalua Plantation Course in Kapalua, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Matt York)

Chris Kirk hits from the 18th tee during the third round of The Sentry golf event, Saturday, Jan. 6, 2024, at Kapalua Plantation Course in Kapalua, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Matt York)

Jordan Spieth lines up his shot on the 17th green during the third round of The Sentry golf event, Saturday, Jan. 6, 2024, at Kapalua Plantation Course in Kapalua, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Matt York)

Xander Schauffele hits from the third tee during the third round of The Sentry golf event, Saturday, Jan. 6, 2024, at Kapalua Plantation Course in Kapalua, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Matt York)

Akshay Bhatia hits from the 18th tee during the third round of The Sentry golf event, Saturday, Jan. 6, 2024, at Kapalua Plantation Course in Kapalua, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Matt York)

Akshay Bhatia watches his shot from the bunker on the second green during the third round of The Sentry golf event, Saturday, Jan. 6, 2024, at Kapalua Plantation Course in Kapalua, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Matt York)

Akshay Bhatia watches his shot on the 17th green during the third round of The Sentry golf event, Saturday, Jan. 6, 2024, at Kapalua Plantation Course in Kapalua, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Matt York)

Collin Morikawa chips onto the 14th green during the third round of The Sentry golf event, Saturday, Jan. 6, 2024, at Kapalua Plantation Course in Kapalua, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Matt York)

Viktor Hovland reacts after his round on 18th green during the third round of The Sentry golf event, Saturday, Jan. 6, 2024, at Kapalua Plantation Course in Kapalua, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Matt York)

Scottie Scheffler acknowledges the gallery on the 10th green during the third round of The Sentry golf event, Saturday, Jan. 6, 2024, at Kapalua Plantation Course in Kapalua, Hawaii. (AP Photo/Matt York)

  • Copy Link copied

KAPALUA, Hawaii (AP) — The views off the west coast of Maui give the PGA Tour’s season opener at Kapalua a relaxing vibe. Inside the ropes, The Sentry is a lot more hectic.

Chris Kirk ran off three straight birdies on the back nine just to keep pace with 21-year-old Akshay Bhatia. Xander Schauffele had eight birdies in 11 holes to stay in the mix. Jordan Spieth, who hit the first foul ball of the year Thursday for double bogey, is now bogey-free in his last 51 holes and has made enough birdies for a chance.

Kirk gave himself a little separation Saturday with a two-putt birdie on the par-5 closing hole at the Plantation course for a 7-under 66.

He leads by one shot over Bhatia (66), with a host of others — past Kapalua champions, major champions and newcomers alike — right behind.

Grayson Murray celebrates winning the Sony Open golf event, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2024, at Waialae Country Club in Honolulu. (AP Photo/Matt York)

“You certainly can’t protect anything out here, that’s for sure,” Kirk said. “When it’s a shootout like this and the scores are really low, you just stay aggressive and just go do your thing.”

Scottie Scheffler, the world’s No. 1 play, didn’t see many putts go in and took a step back with a 71 that feels a lot higher in this tournament. He still was only three behind.

Throw in Patrick Cantlay and Collin Morikawa, and 12 players were within four shots of the lead. That was different from last year, when Morikawa took a six-shot lead into the final round only to be caught by Jon Rahm; the year before, Rahm and Cameron Smith shared the 54-hole lead and were five clear of everyone else.

Kirk was at 21-under 198 in his first time back at Kapalua in eight years. He was the PGA Tour’s comeback player of the year in 2023 from winning the Honda Classic after having stepped away for a big part of 2019 to deal with alcoholism and depression.

He starts the new year with what feels like a sprint on the side of a mountain.

Bhatia, who secured his PGA Tour card through the minor leagues and then won the Barracuda Championship, took only 27 putts for the second straight day. His only lapse was three-putting from 60 feet for par on the 667-yard closing hole.

The group two shots behind included Schauffele (65), who closed with a 62 five years ago to rally for victory at Kapalua; and Spieth (67), who won by eight shots at Kapalua in 2016. They were joined by Byeong Hun An (68).

Schauffele and Spieth know the drill. Most leads are not safe no matter what the score shows, particularly because of a dynamic closing stretch of par 5s and a reachable par 4.

“Definitely keep your head down,” Schauffele said. “There’s really no point looking at a leaderboard early on a property like this.”

Spieth made birdie from a bunker some 40 yards short of the flag on the reachable 14th, one of the most difficult shots in golf, and closed with a 6-iron into the green for a two-putt birdie.

He first came to Kapalua a decade ago and understands the flow of scoring. The trick is to avoid bogeys on the tougher holes and try to pick up a few birdies before the action starts on the reachable par-4 14th.

“Then all of a sudden it’s a sprint and you see who makes four out of the last five,” he said. “That seems to be the case and it probably will be the case tomorrow.”

That was Kirk’s plan Saturday with one wrinkle. The different wind fooled him on his tee shot down the par-5 15th, and he played it too far to the right and into the weeds. He took a penalty drop, had to lay up short of the elevated green and then hit wedge a little too strong, onto the fringe facing a putt downwind, slightly downhill and with the wind at his back.

He holed the putt for a par, ending his streak of three straight birdies and yet still feeling that he had the wind in his sails.

“To make that one after a nice run of birdies before that definitely kept the momentum going,” Kirk said.

Scheffler never had much momentum at all. He made his first birdie on the par-5 fifth, the easiest hole at Kapalua. But he had a three-putt bogey on No. 7, and hit into a bunker below the green at the par-3 eighth that led to another bogey.

Scheffler finished with a three-putt par on the 18th from just under 40 feet. The upside was being only three shots out of the lead, along with Harris English (64), Jason Day (67) and Sahith Theegala (68).

“The back nine, anything can happen,” English said. “I remember getting off to a tough start the final round of that 2021 year and got it going on the back nine and played really well coming down the stretch. I think having some of that patience will help tomorrow.”

AP golf: https://apnews.com/hub/golf

What is the difference between a birdie and a bogey in golf?

  • No comments
  • 5 minute read

birdie en bogey

What is the difference between a circuit breaker and a fuse?

Share article, table of contents hide, the origins of golf, the difference between a birdie and a bogey, how to score a birdie or bogey, why do they call it a birdie in golf, why do they call it a bogey in golf, what are the 7 golf scoring terms in golf, what are 3 birdies in a row called, why does golf have 18 holes, what is the golden rule of golf, is a birdie better than par.

A birdie is one stroke under par, while a bogey is one stroke over par. While both are considered bad scores, a birdie is slightly better than a bogey. If you’re trying to improve your golf game, focus on making more birdies and fewer bogeys.

The game of golf is thought to have originated in Scotland in the 15th century. The word “golf” is derived from the Scots word “gowf”, which means “to strike or hit”. Golf was first mentioned in writing in 1457 when King James II banned the game because it interfered with archery practice.

The modern game of golf is believed to have originated in the early 18th century. The first recorded round of golf was played at Leith Links in 1744. The game quickly became popular among the nobility and gentry of Scotland. In 1754, the Society of St Andrews Golfers (now the Royal and Ancient Golf Club) was founded, and the first rules of golf were published.

The game spread to England in the mid-18th century, where it was initially seen as a curiosity. It was not until the 19th century that golf became established as a popular pastime in England. The first Open Championship was held at Prestwick Golf Club in 1860.

The game rapidly gained popularity worldwide in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The United States became a major force in golf with the founding of the United States Golf Association (USGA) in 1895 and the professional golfer John Dyer winning the first US Open tournament in 1896. Today, golf is played by millions of people around the world.”

In golf, a birdie is one stroke lesser than par, while a bogey is one stroke more than par. A birdie is typically denoted with a “+” symbol next to the score , while a bogey is typically denoted with a “-” symbol. For example, if a player had shot a five on a par four hole, their score would be recorded as “5 (+1),” indicating that they made one bougy during the round.

A birdie is one stroke under par for a hole, while a bogey is one stroke over par for a hole. To score a birdie, you must tee off and then make your second shot from the fairway without hitting into any hazards. To score a bogey, you can either hit into a hazard or miss the fairway with your tee shot.

There are a few different stories about how birdie got its name in golf. One popular theory is that it comes from the British slang word for “young chicken,” which is also pronounced “bird.” Another explanation is that it’s simply a corruption of the word “bride,” because hitting a birdie is supposed to be a lucky shot.

Whatever its origins, birdie has been used to describe a hole-in-one since at least the late 1800s. It’s thought to be one of the oldest terms in golf, and it’s still used today all over the world. So next time you make a great shot on the course, remember: you can thank (or blame) the British for giving us this special term .

There are a few different theories out there as to why golfers refer to a score of one over par as a “bogey.” One popular theory is that the term comes from an old Scottish word, “bogie,” meaning “goblin.” According to this theory, golfers began using the term to describe a score of one over par because it was considered to be unlucky.

Another theory is that the term “bogey” comes from the name of a 19th-century British golfer, Colonel Bogey. This theory suggests that Colonel Bogey was so good at golf that his fellow golfers began using his name to describe a score of one over par.

Whatever the origins of the term “bogey,” it’s clear that it’s been in use for many years. In fact, the first use of the word in print appears to date back to 1898, when it was used in an article about golf in The Field magazine.

1. Bogey: A score of one over par on a hole.

2. Birdie: A score of one under par on a hole.

3. Eagle: A score of three under par on a hole.

4. Albatross : A score of four under par on a hole.

5. Condor: A score of five under par on a hole.

6. Hole in One: A score of six under par on a hole, typically achieved by sinking the ball into the cup with one stroke from the teeing ground.

7. Greenie: A score of seven or better on a regulation golf course, typically achieved by carding a low gross score

A birdie is when a golfer scores one stroke under par for a hole, and a bogey is when a golfer scores one stroke over par for a hole. Three birdies in a row are called a “birdie streak” or simply “three birdies.”

(Photo by Allan Nygren on Unsplash )

Picture of a golf course from above

The number of holes on a golf course varies, but most courses have 18 holes. The reason for this is unclear, but one theory is that 18 holes are just enough to exhaust a player physically and mentally. Another theory is that it takes 18 shots to walk a mile, so playing 18 holes was seen as a good way to get some exercise. Whatever the reason, 18 holes have become the standard for most golf courses around the world.

The golden rule of golf is simple: play the ball as it lies. This means that you must take your shot from where the ball lies, without moving it or improving your lie in any way. This rule is essential to maintaining the integrity of the game and ensuring that all players are on an equal footing.

If you break the golden rule and improve your lie, you will be penalised. The severity of the penalty depends on the infraction, but it could mean anything from a loss of a stroke to disqualification from the competition. So remember, always play the ball as it lies!

In golf, a birdie is one stroke better than par. So, if you’re playing a par 4 hole and you score a 3, that’s a birdie. A bogey, on the other hand, is one stroke worse than par. So, if you’re playing a par 4 hole and you score a 5, that’s a bogey.

Now, which is better? That depends on who you ask! Some golfers will say that a birdie is always better than a bogey because it means you’re scoring below par. Others will say that a birdie isn’t always better than a bogey because it means you’re taking more risks and leaving yourself open to more mistakes.

Either way, the important thing is to have fun out there and try to lower your score as much as possible !

Featured Image by – Courtney Cook on Unsplash

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

You May Also Like

birdie en bogey

  • Editors Choice

What is the difference between skydiving and parachuting?

  • February 18, 2023

birdie en bogey

What is the difference between a longbow and a recurve

  • October 10, 2022

birdie en bogey

What is the difference between decathlon and heptathlon?

  • March 8, 2023

birdie en bogey

  • Business & Commerce

What is the difference between solvency and liquidity?

  • January 15, 2024
  • Health & Fitness

What is the difference between snoring and sleep apnea?

birdie en bogey

  • Agriculture

What is the difference between manure and fertilizer?

  • January 13, 2024

birdie en bogey

What is the difference between psychological and physiological?

Untold Golf

Birdie in Golf | Understanding of A Birdie And How to score it ?

In the exhilarating world of golf, the term “birdie” is music to a golfer’s ears. It represents a remarkable achievement that signifies precision and skill on the course. But what exactly is a birdie in golf, and what makes it so special? In this article, we will delve into the excitement and significance behind the birdie, explore its implications, and provide insights into how you can achieve this awe-inspiring feat.

What is a Birdie in Golf?

In golf, a birdie refers to scoring one stroke under the specified par for a given hole. It signifies completing a hole with one stroke fewer than the expected number of shots. For example, if a hole is designated as a par 4 , scoring a birdie means you completed the hole in just three strokes.

The Significance of a Birdie :

Birdies are cherished and celebrated by golfers of all levels for several reasons:

  • 1- Skill and Precision : Scoring a birdie showcases a golfer’s ability to execute accurate shots and capitalise on scoring opportunities.
  • 2- Positive Momentum: Birdies often serve as a catalyst for building positive momentum during a round, boosting a golfer’s confidence and motivation.
  • 3- Lowering Your Score: Consistently achieving birdies helps in reducing a golfer’s overall score, leading to more competitive performances.
  • 4- Competitive Edge : In professional golf, birdies can be the differentiating factor between winning and losing tournaments.

How Rare are Birdies in Golf?

While birdies are not as rare as eagles (scoring two strokes under par), they are still considered an impressive feat. The frequency of birdies depends on various factors, including the golfer’s skill level, course difficulty, weather conditions, and the length of the hole .

What’s the Difference Between Birdie, Eagle, Par and Albatross?

birdie in golf

  • 1- Birdie: As mentioned earlier, a birdie is scoring one stroke under the specified par for a hole (e.g., completing a par 4 hole in three strokes).
  • 2- Eagle : An eagle is an even more exceptional achievement, signifying scoring two strokes under par for a hole (e.g., completing a par 5 hole in three strokes).
  • 3- Albatross: An albatross , also known as a double eagle, is the rarest of the three, representing scoring three strokes under par for a hole (e.g., completing a par 5 hole in two strokes).
  • 𝟰- 𝐏𝐚𝐫: A par in golf is the number of strokes to get the ball in the hole. There are 3 different types of holesD ‘Par3’, ‘Par4’, ‘Par5’.

This table summarizes the definitions and the sense of achievement associated with Birdie, Eagle , Albatross , and Par in golf. These terms are crucial for golfers and add excitement to the game as they strive to achieve lower scores.

How to Score a Birdie: Tips for Golfers

birdie in golf

Scoring a birdie requires a combination of skill, strategy, and focus. Here are some tips to increase your chances of achieving a birdie:

1. Accurate Approach Shots: Focus on precision during your approach shots to position the ball closer to the pin, giving you a better chance at sinking the putt.

2. Putting Practice: Spend time honing your putting skills, as a well-executed putt is crucial for scoring a birdie.

3. Course Management: Assess the course layout and plan your shots strategically to avoid hazards and set up birdie opportunities.

4. Capitalize on Par 5 Holes: Par 5 holes offer the best chance for birdies, as they are typically longer and provide more opportunities to gain strokes.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ’S) :

Yes, the term “double bogey” is used to describe completing a hole in two strokes over par. It’s the opposite of a birdie and signifies a less favorable outcome on a hole.

Scoring a birdie is considered a notable achievement in golf, as it demonstrates a player’s skill and precision. Birdies contribute to lowering a golfer’s overall score and are often a goal during a round of play.

While birdies are more common among experienced golfers, beginners and casual players can also achieve them. As players improve their skills and gain more control over their shots, they increase their chances of scoring birdies.

On a golf scorecard, a birdie is often represented by marking the score for a hole with a “−1” or a small illustration of a bird. This indicates that the player completed the hole with one stroke less than the designated par.

Golfers cherish Birdies as they demonstrate precision and skill in conquering a hole.

Yes, a Birdie has the magical ability to turn a bad round in golf into a good one. When a golfer achieves a Birdie, it not only improves their score but also infuses them with a newfound confidence and enthusiasm. This boost in morale often leads to better performance on subsequent holes, transforming what started as a challenging round into a successful and memorable one.

A birdie in golf is an outstanding accomplishment, reflecting a golfer’s skill and precision on the course. Scoring one stroke under the par for a hole not only lowers your score but also boosts your confidence and builds positive momentum. While birdies are not as rare as eagles or albatrosses, they are still celebrated and revered by golfers worldwide. With the right approach, practice, and focus, you too can experience the thrill of scoring a birdie and elevate your golfing experience to new heights. So, embrace the challenge and let your shots soar like a bird on the green!

8 thoughts on “Birdie in Golf | Understanding of A Birdie And How to score it ?”

Pingback: Bogey Golf: A Guide to Embracing Imperfection on the Course

Pingback: Golf Scoring: Unlocking the Secrets of Success on the Greens ⛳

Pingback: 50+ Hilarious Golf Puns to Put a Smile on Your Face

Pingback: What is Albatross in Golf: A Hole-by-Hole Guide

Pingback: Golf Up and Down: A Crucial Short Game Skill

Pingback: Eagle in Golf | What is Eagle in Golf? And How To Score It?

Pingback: How Many Acres in a Golf Course? 9-Hole and 18-Hole Course Sizes

Pingback: Golf Flight | What Are Flights in Golf? & Benefits of Using Flight

Leave a Comment Cancel Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

IMAGES

  1. Birdie and Bogey

    birdie en bogey

  2. Kristenfilm: Birdie & Bogey (2004)

    birdie en bogey

  3. Birdie & Bogey Trailer 2004

    birdie en bogey

  4. Birdie & Bogey

    birdie en bogey

  5. Birdie & Bogey (2004)

    birdie en bogey

  6. Birdie & Bogey

    birdie en bogey

COMMENTS

  1. Golf Score Terms: Birdies, Bogeys, Pars, More Meanings

    A birdie is a score of 1-under par on a hole (for example, scoring 4 on a par-5). A bogey is 1-over par on a hole. An eagle is 2-under par on a hole. A double bogey is 2-over par on a hole. A double eagle (very rare) is 3-under par (also called an "albatross"). A triple bogey is 3-over par.

  2. Golf Scoring Terms (Par, Bogey, Birdie, Eagle, Albatross, and More)

    Birdie - A "Birdie" is when a golfer scores one less stroke than par on an individual golf hole. Ex: 2 strokes on a par-3 hole. In 2019, the PGA Tour average number of birdies per round was just 3.68. Justin Thomas led the way, averaging 4.58 birdies per round.

  3. The Power of Understanding: What Birdie and Bogey Mean in Golf

    The Power of Understanding: What Birdie and Bogey Mean in Golf Written by: Joline Winter Published: February 27, 2023 Golf is a game that's been around for centuries, but to the uninitiated, it can seem like an incomprehensible jumble of numbers and terms.

  4. Ultimate guide to common golf terms for beginner golfers

    A birdie? A bogey? Let's start simply with the golf terms "par", "birdie" and "bogey". All three of these golf terms refer to scoring. "Par" represents the number of strokes an expert...

  5. What I Learned: Golf's Fickle Nature Rears Its Head Again With Rory

    With water left and right of the tee, McIlroy found the left pond and after a penalty stroke made a bogey 5 while Fleetwood converted a 16-footer for birdie and the one-shot victory.

  6. What is Birdie In Golf? Bogey, Double Bogey, Eagle, and Albatross

    Bogey: Bogey is a score of one stroke above par. This means a player completes a Hole in 6 strokes on a Par 5 hole. Birdie: On the other hand Birdie happens when a player takes one stroke less to complete a hole. Eagle: Lastly Eagle is a Score when a player takes two strokes less to complete a Hole. Eagle is also called Doule Birdie in Golf.

  7. Golf: Birdie, Par & Bogey

    Golf: Birdie, Par & Bogey. Part of the series: Golf Terms. The terms birdie, par and bogey are used to describe your golf score in relation to par. Learn mor...

  8. Tommy Fleetwood tops Rory McIlroy with birdie-birdie finish to ...

    Rory McIlroy and Tommy Fleetwood bump fists on the 18th green as Fleetwood holes a putt to win the Dubai Invitational at Dubai Creek Golf and Yacht Club on January 14, 2024 in Dubai, United Arab ...

  9. Tommy Fleetwood wins Dubai Invitational in dramatic finish

    Written by DP World Tour. Tommy Fleetwood produced a stunning birdie-birdie finish to hold off the challenge of Rory McIlroy and Thriston Lawrence and win the Dubai Invitational. The Englishman ...

  10. Fleetwood fights off McIlroy to win Dubai Invitational

    McIlroy hit three consecutive birdies early on the back nine to draw level before being undone by a second bogey of the day on the 14th. ... Sloppy bogey on 16th. But birdie, birdie on 17 and 18." ...

  11. Par, Bogey, Birdie, Eagle, Albatross

    There is quite a history behind the golfing terms bogey, par, birdie, eagle and albatross. Bogey and par were central to the development of handicapping, pioneered by the LGU. The modern meaning of three of the terms - bogey, birdie and eagle - comes from their use in USA. Bogey Par Birdie Eagle Albatross Condor Bogey

  12. Dubai Invitational: Tommy Fleetwood pips Rory McIlroy on final hole to

    However, Fleetwood's birdies on the 17th and 18th were met with a birdie and a bogey for McIlroy which saw the lead change with the final shot as the Englishman took victory. McIlroy was happy...

  13. Birdie & Bogey

    Birdie & Bogey is a 2004 Christian drama film directed by Mike Norris and starring Janine Turner, Mike Norris, Sheree J. Wilson, Carey Scott and Amanda Alch.It was released on November 17, 2004, by EMI CMG Distribution. The DVD, which contains "The Making Of", "Trailers", and "Commentary" bonus features, is now available at national retailers from EMI CMG Distribution.

  14. What are the Golf Scoring Names?

    Eagle: Two strokes under par (-2) Birdie: One stroke under par (-1) Par: Strokes equal to par (0) Bogey: One stroke over par (+1) Double Bogey: Two strokes over par (+2) Triple Bogey: Three strokes over par (+3) Scoring an albatross is a rare event, and it is considered one of the most exceptional achievements in golf.

  15. What Is A Birdie In Golf? Explained in Detail

    A Birdie is a score of 1 stroke under par on a hole. For instance, if the par of a hole is 4 strokes, then scoring 3 strokes on that hole would be considered a birdie. Birdies are generally thought to be relatively uncommon occurrences in golf and often seen as something special when achieved. As such, birdies are usually celebrated by players ...

  16. Golf Scoring Terms (Par, Bogey, Eagle, Birdie, Albatross, and More

    Golf, a sport that melds skill, strategy, and a touch of finesse, comes with its own rich vocabulary of Golf scoring terms.From the familiar Stroke to the elusive Condor, each term encapsulates a moment on the course, a stroke of the club that defines a golfer's journey.Let's unravel the language of golf scoring and explore the nuances of Stroke, Par, Birdie, Eagle, Albatross, and more.

  17. Bogey, Birdie, Eagle and Albatross: How These Terms Add Up ...

    It takes a very skilled golfer to put the ball into position to record an eagle. Eagles are most often scored on par-5 holes where long hitters can reach the green in two strokes and then sink the ensuing putt. A hole-in-one on a par-3 hole is also an eagle. Eagles are represented on your scorecard with two circles around the score.

  18. Golf Scorecard Symbols: How to Decipher the Shapes

    For example, if you make a seven on a par 5, this is a double. Try to avoid these if at all possible as it's not easy to bounce back from a double bogey. Triangle . A triangle can mean two different terms depending on the app and is a gray area in the history of golf. First, a triangle on a golf scorecard means a triple bogey (or worse).

  19. Scoring in golf: What is a birdie, eagle, albatross, bogey, etc.?

    — U.S. Open (USGA) (@usopengolf) June 16, 2023 The idea quickly became popular at the Great Yarmouth Club, where the golfer who provided the "ground score" was known as the Bogey Man. This led to...

  20. Golf Scoring Term: Par, Bogey, Birdie, Eagle and More

    Birdie: A birdie is a single stroke under par, so if a golfer takes 3 shots to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored a birdie. Eagle: An eagle is two strokes under par. So if a golfer takes 2 shots to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored an eagle.

  21. Par? Birdie? Eagle? Bogey? GOLF SCORECARD EXPLAINED

    Are you curious how the scoring in golf works? What is a par? Birdie? Eagle? Bogey? Well, in today's video, I go into explaining these terms and what they me...

  22. What are the scores in golf called?

    What is a birdie, eagle, bogey? | Everything you need to know (and more)! What are the scores in golf called? With so many different names for the scores in golf, it can seem incredibly confusing. But scoring in golf is actually quite simple. In this article we'll go through how it works and what the different scores are called.

  23. What is a birdie bogey and eagle in golf?

    Double eagles are often celebrated and can be a once-in-a-lifetime experience for many golfers. To summarize, a birdie is 1-under par, a bogey is 1-over par, an eagle is 2-under par, a double bogey is 2-over par, and a double eagle (or albatross) is 3-under par. These terms are important in golf as they describe a player's score on a specific ...

  24. Birdie & Bogey (2004)

    1 Video 2 Photos Drama Sport A 12 year old gets cancer. She becomes a fighter, not only for herself but her father as well. It will tear the faith of both of them and their mother as well. Director Mike Norris Writer Chris Bessey Stars Janine Turner Mike Norris Carey Scott See production info at IMDbPro 2 User reviews 2 Critic reviews Videos 1

  25. Golf Scoring Terms: Meanings Of Par, Bogey, Birdie, Eagle

    Golf Scoring Terms. Golf scoring terms describe the number of strokes a golfer takes to complete a hole. Par is the number of strokes that an expert golfer is expected to take on a hole. A birdie is one stroke under par, an eagle is two strokes under par, a double bogey is two strokes over par, and a triple bogey is three strokes over par.

  26. Chris Kirk takes Kapalua lead with final birdie. A dozen players are

    Scheffler never had much momentum at all. He made his first birdie on the par-5 fifth, the easiest hole at Kapalua. But he had a three-putt bogey on No. 7, and hit into a bunker below the green at the par-3 eighth that led to another bogey. Scheffler finished with a three-putt par on the 18th from just under 40 feet.

  27. What is the difference between a birdie and a bogey in golf?

    A birdie is one stroke under par, while a bogey is one stroke over par. While both are considered bad scores, a birdie is slightly better than a bogey. If you're trying to improve your golf game, focus on making more birdies and fewer bogeys. The origins of golf The game of golf is thought to have originated in Scotland in the 15th century.

  28. Birdie in Golf

    In the exhilarating world of golf, the term "birdie" is music to a golfer's ears. It represents a remarkable achievement that signifies precision and skill on the course. But what exactly is a birdie in golf, and what makes it so special?