cape dory 36 sailboat review

Cape Dory 36

Pretty lines and forgiving design from Carl Alberg, plus a sturdy build, make this classic a capable offshore cruiser

People are often surprised when they see the image of a handsome Cape Dory 36 pop up on my slide show of 25 great boats for bluewater sailing. Although I think it's beautiful, I don't hide the fact that I am not wild about full keel, short waterline boats. So why is it on my list? First, it is a well-proven Carl Alberg design with countless ocean miles logged, including a couple of circumnavigations. Secondly, it is well engineered and built with quality fittings. And finally, with prices dropping below $60,000, it has changed from being expensive to reasonably affordable, especially for a serious cruising boat.

cape dory 36 sailboat review

Andrew Vavolotis founded Cape Dory Yachts in 1963. The fledgling company went from building the original 10-foot Cape Dory to becoming one of America's premier sailboat builders in the 1970s and 1980s. From the legendary 19-foot Typhoon Weekender to a 45-foot world cruiser, all Cape Dories had one common denominator: designer Alberg. Prolific and consistent, Alberg was a believer in long keels with attached rudders, narrow beam and relatively slack bilges, and easy-to-handle sailplans, preferably cutters. His designs are humble and seaworthy. The 36 was very successful. Introduced in 1978, it remained in production for 12 years and 165 hulls were launched. When Cape Dory went out of business in 1991, Vavolotis managed to keep the 36 molds and transported them to Robinhood Marine in Georgetown, Maine. The CD 36 was reborn as the Robinhood 36, and was available as a semi-custom boat until recently, although just a handful were actually built and sold.

First Impressions The Cape Dory 36 looks at ease in the water. The 36 has a subtle sheerline, and the low freeboard accentuates a low-slung profile. Alberg was a master of creating boats of moderate proportions that gave the impression of being heavier and more conservative than they really were. For example, the CD 36 has a displacement of 16,100 pounds. Contrasted with the Westsail 32's 19,500-pound displacement, the CD 36 is much lighter. Displacement is only part of the equation. The CD 36 has 9 feet of overhangs, and the 27-foot LWL is just 75% of the LOA, which makes it beautiful to look at but not speedy. The full keel is cutaway forward with an attached rudder and the prop is enclosed in an aperture. Most CD 36s were rigged as cutters with a club boom, a few came from the factory as sloops.

Construction For the most part Cape Dory did an excellent job of building boats and the proof is how well they've held up. The hull is hand-laid in a rotating, one-piece mold with alternating layers of fiberglass mat and woven roving. The deck is balsa cored except in areas of high loads and stresses where it is solid glass, plywood or aluminum. The hull-and-deck joint is on a wide, 3-inch inward flange and through-bolted on 12-inch centers, which makes sense. The chemical mastic bond is what keeps the joint from leaking, especially with a uniformly wide flange, and fasteners placed closer together do little to increase strength but plenty to increase the chances of a hull-and-deck joint leak.  Separate tools, or molds, were used to lay up the headliner and the pans in the V-berth and galley. A fiberglass subfloor adds additional athwarthships support, but further limits hull access. The ballast is cast in two pieces and placed inside the keel cavity. It is secured in place with several layers of fiberglass and covered with gelcoat for a smooth, clean bilge finish. The rudder combines two fiberglass half shells filled with a polyester compound and is built around a beefy 1 ½-inch stock.

What to look for The CD 36 has few serious problems as a class. Check for signs of deck delamination, not that it's a common problem, but with a balsa-cored deck you need to be wary. Some owners have had problems with the rudder delaminating. The most serious potential problem is with the chainplates, especially on hulls before No. 71. These early boats had a mild steel web that was used to attach the lower shrouds and the backstay to the hull and this unusual metal bracket was prone to rusting and corrosion. There is plenty of information about chainplate issues and solutions on the Cape Dory owner's page at www.capedory.org. After hull No. 71, an aluminum angle bar was fiberglassed to the hull just below the deck flange. The chainplate tangs were bolted to this weldment, which distributed the rig loads evenly, and most importantly, it didn't corrode as quickly.

On deck Most Cape Dory 36s have wheel steering, and the T-shaped cockpit was designed to accommodate a pedestal and decent-sized wheel. There are tiller boats, and if you will be fitting a windvane self-steering device, a tiller might be preferred. Otherwise, I would look for a CD 36 with a wheel because of the mechanical advantage it offers. The CD 36 can generate plenty of weather helm and the wheel eases the steering load. The visibility from the helm is excellent and the narrow beam places the sheet winches within easy reach. Yet the cockpit still feels spacious and there's plenty of storage with lockers port and starboard and a lazarette astern for the propane tanks. Teak coaming boards are elegant but they are hard on the back and overall the cockpit well is a bit shallow. There's a stout bridgedeck and the mainsheet traveler is usually set up on a bridge spanning the companionway with midboom sheeting on what is a proportionately long boom.  For a narrow boat, the CD 36 side decks are wide and there are long teak handrails atop the cabinhouse and a stout teak toerail. The single-spreader mast is keel-stepped and heavily stayed. The original staysail design called for a club boom, but many boats now have refit the staysail with furling gear.

Down below The CD 36 interior plan is straightforward and functional, and the level of finish is exceptional. Dropping below through the slightly off-center main hatch you find yourself in the galley, with two large sinks and a three-burner cooker. The comparatively small fridge is aft. The small nav station and quarterberth are opposite the galley to starboard. Unfortunately the electrical panel is located directly below the companionway behind the steps. One owner I noticed had covered the panel with clear plastic to keep it dry. The saloon includes an L-shaped settee to port with a straight settee opposite. I like the fold-up table that can be mounted on the bulkhead. Although the 6-foot, 4-inch headroom helps, you can't help but notice how narrow the boat is in the saloon. Continuing forward the head is to port with a hanging locker opposite. The V-berth cabin is spacious. There is storage in well-crafted drawers below the bunks. This is definitely the cabin for sleeping when at anchor, with a large overhead hatch and opening portlights to move the air around. Ventilation is excellent throughout the boat with plenty of opening bronze portlights.

Engine The old reliable Perkins 4-108 4-cylinder 50-horsepower diesel engine was standard on the CD 36. It is shoehorned into place behind the companionway with just enough room to work on it, and most maintenance items are within easy reach. The fuel tank is fiberglass, although some owners have retrofitted an aluminum tank. The engine compartment was nicely soundproofed.

Underway The CD 36 has been unfairly maligned when it comes to performance. You can't compare them to more modern hull shapes. The Cape Dory 36 tracks well and resists pounding in a seaway. With an SA/D of 15.7 and a D/L of 356, the CD 36 isn't fast, but it can carry sail and continue to make way when lighter, faster boats are running for cover in heavy air. Wide sheeting angles, a moderate-aspect rig and long keel prevent it from sailing close to the wind. But the CD 36 tracks quite well, as long as you don't pinch. And finally, the CD 36 heaves-to very well and this is very reassuring to bluewater sailors.

Conclusion The Cape Dory 36 is a quality cruising boat with a proven conservative design and impressive offshore track record. It's not flashy or fast but it is capable and also represents a solid financial value. This is a boat that you confidently entrust with your precious cruising dreams.

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cape dory 36 sailboat review

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  • Sailboat Guide

Cape Dory 36

Cape Dory 36 is a 36 ′ 1 ″ / 11 m monohull sailboat designed by Carl Alberg and built by Cape Dory Yachts between 1978 and 1990.

Drawing of Cape Dory 36

Rig and Sails

Auxilary power, accomodations, calculations.

The theoretical maximum speed that a displacement hull can move efficiently through the water is determined by it's waterline length and displacement. It may be unable to reach this speed if the boat is underpowered or heavily loaded, though it may exceed this speed given enough power. Read more.

Classic hull speed formula:

Hull Speed = 1.34 x √LWL

Max Speed/Length ratio = 8.26 ÷ Displacement/Length ratio .311 Hull Speed = Max Speed/Length ratio x √LWL

Sail Area / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the power of the sails relative to the weight of the boat. The higher the number, the higher the performance, but the harder the boat will be to handle. This ratio is a "non-dimensional" value that facilitates comparisons between boats of different types and sizes. Read more.

SA/D = SA ÷ (D ÷ 64) 2/3

  • SA : Sail area in square feet, derived by adding the mainsail area to 100% of the foretriangle area (the lateral area above the deck between the mast and the forestay).
  • D : Displacement in pounds.

Ballast / Displacement Ratio

A measure of the stability of a boat's hull that suggests how well a monohull will stand up to its sails. The ballast displacement ratio indicates how much of the weight of a boat is placed for maximum stability against capsizing and is an indicator of stiffness and resistance to capsize.

Ballast / Displacement * 100

Displacement / Length Ratio

A measure of the weight of the boat relative to it's length at the waterline. The higher a boat’s D/L ratio, the more easily it will carry a load and the more comfortable its motion will be. The lower a boat's ratio is, the less power it takes to drive the boat to its nominal hull speed or beyond. Read more.

D/L = (D ÷ 2240) ÷ (0.01 x LWL)³

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds.
  • LWL: Waterline length in feet

Comfort Ratio

This ratio assess how quickly and abruptly a boat’s hull reacts to waves in a significant seaway, these being the elements of a boat’s motion most likely to cause seasickness. Read more.

Comfort ratio = D ÷ (.65 x (.7 LWL + .3 LOA) x Beam 1.33 )

  • D: Displacement of the boat in pounds
  • LOA: Length overall in feet
  • Beam: Width of boat at the widest point in feet

Capsize Screening Formula

This formula attempts to indicate whether a given boat might be too wide and light to readily right itself after being overturned in extreme conditions. Read more.

CSV = Beam ÷ ³√(D / 64)

From BlueWaterBoats.org :

Cape Dory Yachts was founded way back in 1963 in New England by sailor and engineer Andrew Vavolotis starting out with a little 15 footer. Through the years the company has forged a great reputation for building sturdy vessels that are safe at sea, simple in layout and easy to handle. Outside of Cape Dory’s pocket cruiser offerings 30 feet and below, the Cape Dory 36 stands out as being the next most popular. Perhaps this has been due to their versatility as both great offshore boats as well as being well suited for weekend and coastal cruising.

The design comes from Carl Alberg , a legendary name in cruising yacht design of the old age before designers like Perry redefined what a cruising sailboat should look like during the boom years of the 1970s and 1980s. Alberg’s design influences came predominantly from the Scandinavian folkboat which emphasized seakindly and well mannered sailing characteristics at the sacrifice of internal volume and initial boat stiffness. The Cape Dory 36 follows this tradition with a narrow beam, low freeboard, large overhangs, and a full keel with a cutaway on the forefoot.

The boat is built strong and a quick check of the heavy rig reveals a cutter configuration which emphasizes offshore work. Yet for the coastal cruising type, these boats are nimble and easy to sail. They have a usefully shallow five foot draft which makes for great bay hopping. The interior is considered cramped by modern standards but livable for couples on extended voyages; reserve the six berths for those social weekends away.

Under sail they track well to windward exhibiting a tendancy to be initially tender which lengthens their effective waterline before stiffening up. The low freeboard concedes a relatively wet ride. On long downward runs, again they track relatively well, except in quartering seas. In chop, expect some amount of hobby-horsing.

Construction has always been top notch throughout and with excellent interior joiner work. Note significant changes were made to the deck and interior arrangement in 1987. Owners haven’t reported any areas of weakness or bad years, and through the years the boats have earned a loyal following.

Cape Dory Yachts ceased operations in New England in 1991 selling the molds for the 36 to Robinhood Marine who continued production with refinements on a semi-custom basis. In total 165 Cape Dory 36s have been built.

Links, References and Further Reading

» Cape Dory Owners Association , Cape Dory 36 brochures and further information. » Cape Dory 36, A Survey , Nautical Quarterly No. 18, Summer 1982 » Robinhood 36 article “Legacy” , Latitudes and Attitudes magazine, May/June 1997

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OPINION : CAPE DORY 36 VS. NIAGRA 35 OR OTHER....IS A FULL KEEL AND SKEG RUDDER THE BEST OPTION ??

  • Thread starter SailingFree
  • Start date Sep 25, 2020
  • Forums for All Owners
  • Ask All Sailors

SailingFree

I'M CONSIDERING 2 DIFFERENT SAILBOATS....THE CAPE DORY 36 OR THE NIAGRA HINTERHOELLER 35 OR ANOTHER.....PLS PROVIDE YOUR VIEWS.....I NEED THE BOAT TO HAVE BLUEWATER CAPABILITY WHEN I NEED IT TO BUT WILL BE DOING MOSTLY COASTAL CRUISING ALONG THE KEYS AND SAILING THE CARIBBEAN.....NO OCEAN CROSSINGS INTENDED.....WHAT BOAT DO YOU RECOMMEND ??.....THANK YOU !  

Ok, welcome Sailing Free, first there is no need to use all caps. All caps is generally considered to be yelling or shouting. Not sure that this is way you want to come off. To your question, both boats are good boats, well built and suitable for coastal sailing. The Niagara 35 probably has a larger interior.  

No yelling intended....the caps are just there to make it clearer....that whole caps = screaming is more of a gen X gen Y /snowflake thing which I think is pretty stupid.....but no yelling intended  

dlochner said: Ok, welcome Sailing Free, first there is no need to use all caps. All caps is generally considered to be yelling or shouting. Not sure that this is way you want to come off. To your question, both boats are good boats, well built and suitable for coastal sailing. The Niagara 35 probably has a larger interior. Click to expand

Stu Jackson

Stu Jackson

SailingFree said: ...that whole caps = screaming is more of a gen X gen Y /snowflake thing which I think is pretty stupid.....but no yelling intended Click to expand

I'm nowhere near either of those Gens, and it reads like yelling to me! Also, just plain harder to read.  

Stu Jackson said: Sorry, but it's simply a courtesy "thing." "gen" or "snowflake" is almost always projection. Sad...folk. So? Stop yelling. Thx, see how easy it is to keep caps lock off? Your "reason" to turn it on is, well, "snowflakie"... Click to expand

justsomeguy

justsomeguy

Well, that escalated quickly.  

31seahorse

Welcome SailingFree, Lets start this discussion again. RE: St Petersburg and Florida waters in general.......Draft is of importance to me and might be a prime consideration to you for coastal sailing in the Sunshine State. Compare draft of each boat along with other factors you can observe in the boat as you visit. Engine condition, accommodations, ground tackle, sail condition, functioning AC, and many more things must be considered. Enjoy the search.  

Davidasailor26

Davidasailor26

Practical sailor did a review of the Niagara 35 and spoke well of the build quality - Niagara 31/35 - Practical Sailor . I can’t find a similar review from them of the Cape Dory 36. Anecdotally the Cape Dory’s I’ve seen have had more gelcoat cracks than other boats their age. +1 for 31Seahorse’s point about draft, but the Niagara only draws 2” more than the Cape Dory, so no big distinction there, and either is probably ok at around 5’. The full keel design is traditionally favored over the fin and spade for cruising, but people have used fin and spade designs in plenty of blue water crossings too, and it’ll probably sail to weather a lot better than the full keel. The Niagara rates about 27 seconds per mile faster than the Cape Dory in PHRF, which is not an insignificant amount. And PS studies have shown that the readability of all caps is less than properly cased text.  

JK_Boston_Catalina310

JK_Boston_Catalina310

You have touched one of the third rails of sailing (anchor choice and guns on boats being the other major third rail discussions). You will get a wide variety of responses, many of which are parroting other armchair sailors or saying their choice of boat is best My response is there are no such things as bluewater boats, only bluewater crews. I have seen morons sink Westsails within a few miles of harbor and met competent crews that have sailed a Beneteau around the world. There is no specific list of features that make one boat safer than another. Everything on a boat is a compromise and you need to evaluate those compromises for what fits you best. So why are you limiting your search to these two boats? Is there something about them that appeals to you or did you read about them on a list somewhere. Good luck and fair winds  

SailingFree said: Ahhhh....that's called PROJECTION of Snow-flake-ness onto someone who is 54 years old ( probably old enough to be your father . ) and NOT a snowflake . ......see how easy that was guy ?? Click to expand

RoyS

Here are a couple of points to consider. Fin keels, with or without wings, leave the prop and rudder more exposed to entanglement with lobster pot lines and the like. Full keels are nearly impossible to back up. If choosing a fin keel with wings look for one where the rudder is not the first thing to strike bottom in too shallow water. Fin keels when anchored can and do wrap the anchor line (if nylon and not all chain) around the keel if a kellet is not deployed. There are also centerboard keels to be considered. You are in a great place to be able to consider all the trade offs and to pick the best boat for your needs. None will be perfect for all conditions. Choose carefully.  

Kings Gambit

Kings Gambit

JK_Boston_Catalina310 said: My response is there are no such things as bluewater boats, only bluewater crews. I have seen morons sink Westsails within a few miles of harbor and met competent crews that have sailed a Beneteau around the world. There is no specific list of features that make one boat safer than another. So why are you limiting your search to these two boats? Is there something about them that appeals to you or did you read about them on a list somewhere. Good luck and fair winds Click to expand

FastOlson

Regarding the all-cap text, I see it differently. Capitalized text is not shouting; it’s EMPHASIS. But, if the whole text is capitalized there is no “emphasis.” So, you’re left with a bunch of text that’s harder to read than it needs to be b/c it’s mono-text. Same as when all is written in lower case. There are reasons for the combination of caps and lowercase in sentences. If you wish someone to read and comprehend your text, then follow the rules of good writing, etc. BTW. Someone attending elementary school in the 1970’s was at the leading edge of some nonsense generational “norms“ such as mentioned above that have since overtaken us. However, not everybody succumbed.  

Design, construction, & wear are three different topics. The full-keel/skeg designs reflect intended use. Construction quality is a subject of price/cost. Wear is a matter of age and use. True, this discussion began with the search for an old boat, perhaps one DESIGNED for bluewater cruising as experienced in past decades. There is a range of qualities of construction. Go for a Pacific SeaCraft, Valliant, Island Packet, or Moody to escape the construction quality variable.  

JK_Boston_Catalina310 said: You have touched one of the third rails of sailing (anchor choice and guns on boats being the other major third rail discussions). You will get a wide variety of responses, many of which are parroting other armchair sailors or saying their choice of boat is best My response is there are no such things as bluewater boats, only bluewater crews. I have seen morons sink Westsails within a few miles of harbor and met competent crews that have sailed a Beneteau around the world. There is no specific list of features that make one boat safer than another. Everything on a boat is a compromise and you need to evaluate those compromises for what fits you best. So why are you limiting your search to these two boats? Is there something about them that appeals to you or did you read about them on a list somewhere. Good luck and fair winds Click to expand
Kings Gambit said: Design, construction, & wear are three different topics. The full-keel/skeg designs reflect intended use. Construction quality is a subject of price/cost. Wear is a matter of age and use. True, this discussion began with the search for an old boat, perhaps one DESIGNED for bluewater cruising as experienced in past decades. There is a range of qualities of construction. Go for a Pacific SeaCraft, Valliant, Island Packet, or Moody to escape the construction quality variable. Click to expand
SailingFree said: Yeah, but the problem with Island Packets and the like is that they're all WAYYYY OVER-PRUCED relative to cheaper options like a 1980s Cape Dory or an Albert or an Endeavour 37, etc. Click to expand
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The Third Quarter

  • Cape Dory & Robinhood
  • Fixin' Things

Cape Dory 36 & Robinhood 36 Sailboats

6 comments:.

cape dory 36 sailboat review

Thank-you for the background on the Robinhood 36. It's a handsome boat with a warm interior. She looks to be well founded and will prove to be a good cruiser.

cape dory 36 sailboat review

I concur: The CD36 and the Robinhood are virtually identical. I see a few differences here and there, but there were changes between the early-model CD36s and the later models. Our cockpit coaming, for example, is teak board. In the cabin, the mast is exposed and the head compartment does not extend as far forward into the v-berth as yours appears to. Otherwise, she's much the same...Gorgeous and traditional!

By the way, I love the picture of you patting her hull. I do that several times during the winter to reassure Ariel that she'll be in the water again soon.

cape dory 36 sailboat review

That's just a lovely hull! I see that you are already treating her like a member of the family!

Yeah, she really looks great. Warm, cozy, clean and homey. Looking forward to seeing her come along.

cape dory 36 sailboat review

Thanks for all the nice comments, folks. As for petting her hull (and toe rail, and deck, and bulkheads, etc.) I can't explain where this habit came from, but it's almost unconscious - as I step aboard, or leave at the end of a weekend. And when I correspond with her original owners - the folks she was built for in 96 - they ask us to pat her hull with a hello from them. It's a sweet and funny thing, this boat-love. :)

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CAPE DORY 36 Detailed Review

https://images.harbormoor.com/originals/9df3e6bc-a406-48e1-8068-8a3f09fa5d7e

If you are a boat enthusiast looking to get more information on specs, built, make, etc. of different boats, then here is a complete review of CAPE DORY 36. Built by Cape Dory Yachts and designed by Carl Alberg, the boat was first built in 1978. It has a hull type of Long Keel and LOA is 11.01. Its sail area/displacement ratio 15.67. Its auxiliary power tank, manufactured by undefined, runs on Diesel.

CAPE DORY 36 has retained its value as a result of superior building, a solid reputation, and a devoted owner base. Read on to find out more about CAPE DORY 36 and decide if it is a fit for your boating needs.

Boat Information

Boat specifications, sail boat calculation, rig and sail specs, auxillary power tank, accomodations, contributions, who designed the cape dory 36.

CAPE DORY 36 was designed by Carl Alberg.

Who builds CAPE DORY 36?

CAPE DORY 36 is built by Cape Dory Yachts.

When was CAPE DORY 36 first built?

CAPE DORY 36 was first built in 1978.

How long is CAPE DORY 36?

CAPE DORY 36 is 8.23 m in length.

What is mast height on CAPE DORY 36?

CAPE DORY 36 has a mast height of 11.28 m.

Member Boats at HarborMoor

Review of Cape Dory 36

Basic specs..

The Cape Dory 36 is equipped with a long keel. A long keel provide a better directional stability than a similar boat with a fin keel; on the other hand, better directional stability means also that the boat is more difficult to handle in a harbour with less space.

The boat can enter most marinas as the draft is just about 1.52 - 1.62 meter (4.99 - 5.29 ft) dependent on the load. See immersion rate below.

The boat is typically equipped with an engine.

Sailing characteristics

This section covers widely used rules of thumb to describe the sailing characteristics. Please note that even though the calculations are correct, the interpretation of the results might not be valid for extreme boats.

What is Theoretical Maximum Hull Speed?

The theoretical maximal speed of a displacement boat of this length is 7.0 knots. The term "Theoretical Maximum Hull Speed" is widely used even though a boat can sail faster. The term shall be interpreted as above the theoretical speed a great additional power is necessary for a small gain in speed.

The immersion rate is defined as the weight required to sink the boat a certain level. The immersion rate for Cape Dory 36 is about 179 kg/cm, alternatively 1006 lbs/inch. Meaning: if you load 179 kg cargo on the boat then it will sink 1 cm. Alternatively, if you load 1006 lbs cargo on the boat it will sink 1 inch.

Sailing statistics

This section is statistical comparison with similar boats of the same category. The basis of the following statistical computations is our unique database with more than 26,000 different boat types and 350,000 data points.

What is L/B (Length Beam Ratio)?

What is a Ballast Ratio?

Maintenance

When buying anti-fouling bottom paint, it's nice to know how much to buy. The surface of the wet bottom is about 20m 2 (215 ft 2 ). Based on this, your favourite maritime shop can tell you the quantity you need.

Are your sails worn out? You might find your next sail here: Sails for Sale

If you need to renew parts of your running rig and is not quite sure of the dimensions, you may find the estimates computed below useful.

This section shown boat owner's changes, improvements, etc. Here you might find inspiration for your boat.

Do you have changes/improvements you would like to share? Upload a photo and describe what to look for.

We are always looking for new photos. If you can contribute with photos for Cape Dory 36 it would be a great help.

If you have any comments to the review, improvement suggestions, or the like, feel free to contact us . Criticism helps us to improve.

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cape dory 36 sailboat review

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Cape Dory 30

Our pick of these boats is a cutter-rigged late model with full-width galley and pedestal steering..

cape dory 36 sailboat review

When the Cape Dory 30 entered production in 1976, it was the largest boat in the expanding line of the Taunton, Massachusetts boatbuilder. In 1986, when production ceased, over 350 Cape Dory 30s had been built, and what had been the largest boat in the company’s fleet was one of the smallest.

In 1986, Cape Dory introduced the Cape Dory 30 Mk II, an entirely different boat, designed in-house (rather than by Carl Alberg), longer on the waterline, 1 1/2′ wider, and with a far roomier and more modern interior.

The old Cape Dory 30 was designed as a ketch, with cutter or sloop rigs optional. In the middle of the production run, the more efficient cutter rig replaced the ketch as standard. The ketch remained an option.

The Cape Dory line always consisted of traditional- looking, long-keel cruising boats, and their appeal has been strongest on the East Coast, particularly in New England, a well-known hotbed of sailing reactionaries.

Sailing Performance

No one buys a Cape Dory looking for a flashy speedster. The original ketch rig has a lot of windage, and relatively small, inefficient sails. The rig does, however, give the boat a distinctly “shippy” traditional appearance.

A PHRF rating of about 220 shows the ketch to be a slow boat. By way of contrast, the old original C&C 25 carries about the same rating. The cutter-rigged Cape Dory 30 is about 15 seconds per mile faster.

The Cape Dory 30 was originally equipped with worm gear steering. This type of gear is powerful, foolproof, and requires no steering pedestal in the cockpit. The wheel will also hold the rudder in position without a brake. The disadvantage is that there is almost no rudder feedback, so that it’s hard to tell when the boat is properly balanced. Worm gear steering will not make you a better sailor.

The worm gear steerer is especially compatible with the original ketch rig. Since the mizzen is stepped in the middle of the cockpit, it’s nice to get the steering wheel back aft where it won’t take up any usable space. The top of the steering gear box also serves as a good helmsman’s seat.

With the cutter rig, it became feasible to put a more conventional pedestal steerer in the boat. However, moving the steerer further forward meant that the old steering box—now a storage locker—was too far away from the wheel to be used as a seat.

In practice, you usually sit to the side of the wheel with a pedestal steerer, not behind it. But this re- quires a wheel that is big enough to let you get far enough outboard to see sail trim. Most helmsmen will only sit directly behind the wheel when the boat is under power and they can see straight ahead, with no sails in the way.

The big steering wheel that’s the easiest to use with pedestal steering almost requires a T-shaped cockpit for easy maneuverability. The Cape Dory 30 stuck with the straight bench cockpit seats, and used a fairly small destroyer wheel. Although you don’t need the leverage of a big wheel on this boat, it will make steering less tiring, and there is room between the seats to fit a larger-diameter wheel. It would make it necessary to climb over the seats to go forward, however.

Most owners report that the boat—with either rig—is easy to balance under sail. The percentage reporting difficulty in balancing the boat complain of excessive weather helm on a close reach.

Hard steering when reaching is a common complaint on boats with attached rudders and a lot of rake to the rudderpost. The Cape Dory 30 does have a relatively efficient Constellation-type rudder, even if it is located about 2′ further forward than it would be with a comparable fin keel and spade rudder underbody.

Weather helm when reaching is frequently caused by overtrimming the main. On a boat without a vang, the boom tends to lift quickly as the sheet is eased, and the top of the sail twists off and begins to luff. Thinking they’ve eased the sheet too much, many sailors will at that point overtrim the main, shifting the draft of the sail aft and creating weather helm. Under those conditions, the proper thing to do with the Cape Dory 30 is use mainsheet tension to create a fair leech, then ease the traveler down to keep the whole sail working.

On both rigs, the mainsail is controlled by a traveler over the main companionway.

With the ketch rig, the mast is stepped further forward than the cutter, and the mainsheet attaches to the boom about two-thirds of the way aft, giving reasonable leverage. With the cutter, the mast location means that the mainsheet attaches almost exactly at the boom midpoint, reducing leverage and making the sail somewhat harder to trim.

In either case the traveler location at the forward end of the companionway is out of the way, but it makes installing a cockpit dodger more difficult.

The cutter’s main boom is at a reasonable height, but the taller helmsman should still watch his head when tacking.

With the advent of modern headsail reefing systems, the cutter rig is really superfluous on this boat. The small gap between the forestay and headstay makes it difficult to tack a big genoa, yet you really need a big genoa if this fairly heavy boat is to be properly powered in light air. The double head rig is fine in breezes over 15 knots, but in lighter air it’s much slower than a good number one genoa.

According to owners, the boat’s only sailing weakness is light air. With a lot of wetted surface and an inefficient foretriangle, the boat is simply not going to be fast in very light air. All in all, though, owners say the boat is faster than they expected it to be in all conditions.

With a 40% ballast/displacement ratio, the Cape Dory 30 is reasonably stiff despite the very narrow beam. You can get stability with a lot of ballast down low, or with a lot of beam. The Cape Dory 30 gets it from a lot of ballast, placed low in the hull.

With less weight aloft, the cutter should be slightly stiffer than the ketch.

Both the ketch and cutter rig use simple, untapered aluminum masts, stepped on deck. With a stiff section and double lower shrouds, these rigs are fairly foolproof.

Unlike many builders, Cape Dory put diesel engines in every inboard-powered sailboat they built after 1975. You won’t find an Atomic 4 here.

What you will find, unfortunately, is an engine installation and selection that is somewhat less than ideal.

Because this is a narrow boat with slack bilges, it wasn’t possible to get the engine far enough down in the bilge to be out of the way in a normal installation. Instead, the engine is mounted under the cockpit, using a V-drive. The engine is kept out of the way, but out of sight in this case means poor access for servicing. Getting to the alternator belts for adjustment, for example, requires crawlingunder the cockpit through a locker.

The original engine was a single-cylinder Yanmar diesel rated at 12 hp. This engine is too small for the boat, and single-cylinder engines are notorious for their vibration.

Starting with 1977 models, the Yanmar diesel was replaced with a Volvo MD7A, rated at 13 hp. The Volvo engine has more displacement, and has two cylinders. Nevertheless, some owners still complain that the boat is underpowered with the Volvo diesel.

Despite the long keel, the Cape Dory is reasonably maneuverable under power. The exception is handling in reverse, which according to many owners varies from unpredictable to impossible. This is not a characteristic unique to this boat; it is a fault of most long-keel boats with attached rudders. You learn to act as if reverse were nothing more than a set of brakes—not very good ones, at that.

Other than its location, the engine installation itself is pretty good, with dual fuel filters, 1″ bronze shaft, and oil drip pan under the engine. The fuel tank capacity of 20 gallons should give well over 200 miles range under power with any of the engines.

During the 1983 model year, a switch was made to a two-cylinder Universal diesel. We would definitely prefer a boat with either the Volvo or Universal engine over the original small Yanmar.

Construction

The Cape Dory 30 is solidly built, although there is nothing particularly innovative or unusual about the construction. The hull is a solid fiberglass laminate, the deck is balsa cored. No owners in our survey mention problems with either hull or deck construction.

A number of owners have reservations about the hull-to-deck joint, which is not through-bolted. Other owners mention that there are washers but no backing plates on deck hardware such as lifeline stanchions. Although none report problems either with deck hardware or the hull-to-deck joint, their concerns are valid. Backing plates on deck hardware help distribute loads, and reduce the chance of stress cracks around fittings. Likewise, a through-bolted hull-to-deck connection offers a foolproof mechanical backup should the polyester putty bond between the hull and deck fail. Bolts won’t stop leaks, but a through-bolted joint won’t come apart until the surrounding glass fails.

As in most boats this size, the lifeline stanchions are only 24″ high. This is too low for any real security—the lifelines strike most people just about at knee height, the right height for tripping. There are some bolts through the hull-to-deck joint, since both the lifeline stanchions and chainplates fasten through the inward-turning hull flange. We would, however, prefer to see closely-spaced bolts throughout the length of the joint.

Chainplates are cast bronze lugs bolted through the hull and deck flange. As long as the hull and deck are adequately reinforced—and they are, in this case—this type of installation is fine.

We’ve seen the same general type of chainplates on 40′ boats with Lloyds certificates, so they can’t be all bad.

All Cape Dory boats came with deck hardware— cleats, winch islands, bow fittings, seacocks and chainplates—by Spartan, a sister company to Cape

Dory. This is good stuff that will last the life of the boat and then some. The only disadvantages are that it is heavy, being bronze, and is not very well finished.

Going from burnished to polished finish just about doubles the price of a piece of hardware— polishing is very labor intensive—and on most Cape Dory 30s you’ll find burnished hardware. It’s rugged, though.

There’s a fair amount of exterior teak on these boats, including cockpit coamings, toerails, hatch trim, and eyebrow trim around the cabin on later models. This gives the boat a yachty appearance, but it does increase maintenance.

You could get the Cape Dory 30 in any color you wanted, as long as it was Cape Dory white with a nicely-contrasting tan deck. Several owners report discoloration of the colored portion of the non-skid decks. The non-skid itself is quite functional.

Early boats in this series have an unusual water tankage arrangement. One tank is plumbed to the head sink, the other to the galley.

Since you use a lot more water in the galley than in the head, that tank runs out first. Many owners have replumbed these tanks so that you can use the entire water supply.

Some early boats also have the water tank fills located below, which may be fine for keeping salt water out of the tanks, but can make for a fire drill when trying to fill them without making a mess. On later boats there is a 30-gallon water tank under each main cabin settee, and the system is correctly plumbed.

There are proper seacocks on all fittings below the waterline.

The deck-stepped rigs in both the cutter and ketch are well engineered, as no owners in our survey report any deck deflection or stress cracking in that area.

Unlike a lot of 30-footers, the Cape Dory 30 was designed as a small seagoing boat. For example, it has a reasonable bridge deck, although it is lower than the main cockpit seats and the cockpit coamings.There is also a sea hood over the main companionway hatch.

The main companionway is an unusual design. The vertical part of the companionway is fairly narrow and straight sided—good features in terms of seaworthiness. The sliding hatch and its opening are wider, letting more light and air below.

Relatively few owners in our survey report gelcoat blistering. The only glasswork complaints were gelcoat crazing in an early model, and discoloration of the gelcoat in the hull liner, cabin overhead, and non-skid areas in the deck.

Compared to newer 30-footers, the Cape Dory 30 is cramped below. The boat is more than a foot narrower than the typical cruiser/racer built today, and about 2′ shorter on the waterline. There’s no way around it: this is a small boat.

Within these limitations, the interior layout is pretty good. There are V-berths forward, with a dropin insert to form a double. The forward berths are narrow at the foot.

Ventilation in the forward cabin is provided by two opening ports plus an overhead Bomar aluminum- framed hatch. There are drawers and lockers beneath the berths.

The head compartment utilizes the full width of the boat, the way it should on a boat this narrow. Outboard of the toilet is a hanging locker. Opposite the toilet there is a dresser with sink.

A grate in the head sole for a shower was standard equipment, but the pressure water necessary to use it was an option. If you’re going to spend more than a weekend on a boat, a shower is almost mandatory.

Inexplicably, the head sink and shower drain into the bilge. This is unacceptable. Because of the boat’s low freeboard, the head sink is too low to be plumbed directly overboard if you expect it to drain on port tack. The best solution, although it is somewhat awkward, would be to install a closed sump tank in the bilge. It could be emptied overboard by either a manual or an electric pump. You wouldn’t want your bathroom sink and shower to drain into your basement, would you?

Two opening ports plus a cowl vent in a Dorade box provide ventilation in the head. If it were our boat, we’d also install a small venting hatch or another Dorade box over the head, even though the standard arrangement is better than you find on many larger boats.

The main cabin has settees which double as berths along either side. There are narrow shelves above and outboard of each settee.

Since the water tanks take up most of the volume below the main cabin settees, there is little storage space available in the main cabin.

As in most boats this size, the main cabin table folds down from the forward main bulkhead. It will seat four, although in a somewhat cramped fashion.

In the original layout, the galley aft runs the full width of the boat. On the port side there is a pressurized, two-burner gimbaled alcohol stove with oven.

If you want to stay with alcohol cooking fuel, we recommend switching to a non-pressurized stove such as the Origo. Despite the fact that alcohol fires can be extinguished with water, pressurized alcohol stoves can be dangerous because most people underestimate the volatility of the fuel.

The sinks are aft of the stove, and are somewhat difficult to reach because the slope of the bilge intrudes into the space where you would normally stand.

Opposite the stove there is a good galley dresser containing an icebox, storage bin, and drawers. The icebox drains into the bilge. This is a poor arrangement, since organic matter from the icebox will inevitably contaminate the bilge, even if it is pumped daily. The icebox could either be pumped into the galley sink, or into the sump you install for the head sink and shower.

With this layout, you use the top of the icebox as a navigation table. The lack of a good place to do chart work is a common failing in older designs of this size.

Late in the production run, the interior layout was “modernized” by adding a quarterberth and small chart table. The arrangement takes up a lot of the space that was formerly used for the galley. You get another berth—which you don’t need—at the cook’s expense. We don’t think this layout is an improvement, despite the fact that the navigator gets his or her own workspace.

Headroom on centerline in the main cabin is just over 6′, with slightly less further forward.

Main cabin ventilation is good, with four opening ports—excellent bronze Spartan ports—and an overhead Bomar hatch. We’d add a pair of cowl vents in Dorade boxes on either side of the ventilation hatch. The space is there, and the job is pretty simple. Although the galley has reasonable storage, there is little storage space in the rest of the boat. This makes the boat unsuitable as a long-term cruising boat, unless you want to do a fair amount of modification to the interior.

Joinerwork and finishing detail throughout are of good production boat quality. Since a lot of teak is used for interior woodwork, the boat is quite dark below.

You could brighten this up a lot by finishing the interior with gloss varnish, rather than the standard satin oil finish.

Conclusions

With her narrow beam and short waterline, the Cape Dory 30 is a lot smaller than newer boats of this length and displacement. The boat will have a strong appeal to the traditionalist who places a high value on appearance.

The boats are well constructed, suited for serious coastal cruising, and perhaps for limited offshore sailing.

Cape Dory boats were quite expensive, but they hold their value well. When production began in 1976, the Cape Dory 30 had a base price of about $29,000. By the time production ceased a decade later, the price had almost doubled—but so had the price of just about everything.

Although some might prefer the “shippiness” of the ketch rig, the cutter is both faster and more practical. Some boats were built as sloops, and this would be the best rig of all. Inevitably, the Cape Dory 30 will be compared to the Alberg 30. The Cape Dory 30 is longer on the waterline, wider, heavier, and has a roomier interior. The Cape Dory 30 cutter is slightly faster than the sloop-rigged Alberg 30.

Our choice in a Cape Dory 30 would be a latemodel cutter with full-width galley, Edson pedestal, and the Volvo or Universal diesel. For the money, you get a well-designed traditional boat that is a good coastal cruiser for a couple or a small family. We don’t think the boat is big enough for four adults for anything more than weekend sailing.

If you want the looks of an older boat but the construction details and diesel engine found in newer boats, the Cape Dory 30 is a good choice.

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14 comments.

Some photos would be useful in an article like this. Remember a photo is worth how many words? Regards

Agree – at least one picture of the entire boat would’ve been appreciated

Good article. very informative

If you’re a sailor you’re proud to show your boat! Where are the photos of this boat???

Pictures would’ve been great

If readers are accessing this story on-line, a quick search for “Cape Dory 30 Mark II” produces 1.7 million images.

…so even less excuse for not putting a couple here… 🙂

Cape Dory apparently ventured into trying to have a little more modern design by producing around 75 or so boats with a fin keel and sloop rig – Intrepid 9m by Cape Dory. Ours was originally outfitted with the Volvo diesel but was at some point changed to a 27hp Yanmar 3 cylinder. Much of the Cape Dory 30 interior description sounds similar. It’s been a slow project for us with much to do.

This article was previously published in the 6th edition of Practical Boat Buying in 2003, and perhaps in earlier editions as well. Originally, the article included a sail plan and line drawing of the layout.

i have the Cape Dory 31. One foot difference makes a big difference in the layout. I love the boat.

I bought a 1978 Cape Dory 30 ketch a few years ago, my first big boat, in the hopes of coastal and some blue water cruising. I appreciate the comments made in the article, there are many good points made. A few comments/questions: -I agree with the discussion of backing the boat; I cannot claim to do it well, especially in crosswinds out of a slip. Nice to know I am not alone. -Not sure I understand why the ketch would be more tender than the cutter; its mainmast is a foot or two shorter with a resulting shorter lever-arm. -It should be mentioned that the ketch has a longer on-deck space than the cutter, making it possible to carry a small dinghy on deck; I’m not sure this would be possible with the cutter. -The ketch allows flexibility in sail handling: I can sail with furling genoa and mizzen with good balance, raising and trimming without leaving the cockpit. This is a real blessing for single handing, of which I do a fair amount. -I have installed a Schaefer furler for the genoa, replacing the much older poorly functioning furler that came with the boat. I can self tack the genoa using the jibboom that came with the boat, or raise a storm jib with the jibboom and self tack with a sail well back off the bowsprit. Again, nice for cruising, single handing, and heavy air. -It probably should be mentioned that the Cape Dorys have internal ballasted molded in keel. This may be an advantage in an older boat since one does not have to worry about aging keel bolts. The 4 foot draft, with long keel and attached rudder is an advantage in places like the Louisiana Gulf Coast with plenty of shallow, quite muddy water. Yes, unfortunately, I know this from experience. -Recent hurricanes have put a number of boats ashore. Friends from Texas have told me that one of their members’ Cape Dorys went ashore losing mast and rigging, but little damage to the hull. Anecdotal, but the hull is thick with good glasswork. -I agree with the assessment of the bronze steering gear that came with the boat. It seems bulletproof and simple. Any assessment as to whether it would work with an autopilot system? -thanks for the article.

How does this boat look like, no photos, Great article, not.

For those not entirely reading the fine article…

“ By Darrell Nicholson – June 14, 2000”

Solid review.

What the cape dory cutter rig really needs is a Bowsprit a rather long one at that. Put a 3-4 ft bow sprit on it move the head stay out to the end and the move the staysail stay to where the head stay was and you then have a far better sail plan and you would increase the displacement to sail area ratio to quite speedy levels. Also the main needs a boomvang. The mast without a bowsprit is still too far forward for an efficient cutter rig. (Ona cutter the mast should really be center of the sail plan. I can see looking at the standard sail plan why it would have excessive weather helm not enough head sail area to overcome the main and over all not enough sail area. Carl Alberg included a small bowsprit on the Cape dory 28 and looking at the design of the 30 most of the extra length was added aft. Of the keel. I would really like to see what a long bowsprit would do (would also help with anchoring as you could get the bow roller further out)

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  1. 1983 Cape Dory 36 Sail Boat For Sale

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  2. 1984 Cape Dory 36 Sail Boat For Sale

    cape dory 36 sailboat review

  3. 1981 Cape Dory 36 Sail Boat For Sale

    cape dory 36 sailboat review

  4. Cape Dory 36

    cape dory 36 sailboat review

  5. Cape Dory 36

    cape dory 36 sailboat review

  6. 1984 Used Cape Dory 36 Cutter Cruiser Sailboat For Sale

    cape dory 36 sailboat review

VIDEO

  1. Cape Dory 31 Part 1

  2. Sailing, Cape Dory 30 May 21, 2023

  3. Cape Dory 36, Lake Michigan Sailing

  4. Cape Dory 36 sailing to weather

  5. Sailing our Cape Dory in Naples Florida

  6. Cape Dory 36, Ariel, There and Back, 2008

COMMENTS

  1. Cape Dory 36

    The Cape Dory 36 tracks well and resists pounding in a seaway. With an SA/D of 15.7 and a D/L of 356, the CD 36 isn't fast, but it can carry sail and continue to make way when lighter, faster boats are running for cover in heavy air. ... The Cape Dory 36 is a quality cruising boat with a proven conservative design and impressive offshore track ...

  2. Cape Dory 36? Pros and Cons

    Posts: 1,594. The Cape Dory 36 is a great boat. They do like to sail heeled more than a modern flat bottomed boat. Their stiffness does not come into play until they are heeled 15 degrees or so. They track like trains. They handle heavy weather nicely and heave to with the best.

  3. The Best Sailboats for the High Seas?

    I have reservations about any ideal boat list, but Kretschmer, who reviews boats for Sail Magazine and whose most recent book Sailing a Serious Ocean is ... Pacific Seacraft 34, Pretorien 35, Cape Dory/Robinhood 36, Valiant/Esprit 37, Prout Snowgoose 37, Alajuela 38, Privelege 39, Freya 39, Passport 40, Caliber 40, Baba 40, Hallberg Rassy 42 ...

  4. CAPE DORY 36

    It takes into consideration "reported" sail area, displacement and length at waterline. The higher the number the faster speed prediction for the boat. A cat with a number 0.6 is likely to sail 6kts in 10kts wind, a cat with a number of 0.7 is likely to sail at 7kts in 10kts wind. KSP = (Lwl*SA÷D)^0.5*0.5

  5. Cape Dory 36

    Cape Dory 36 is a 36′ 1″ / 11 m monohull sailboat designed by Carl Alberg and built by Cape Dory Yachts between 1978 and 1990. ... Sail area in square feet, derived by adding the mainsail area to 100% of the foretriangle area (the lateral area above the deck between the mast and the forestay). D: ...

  6. Opinion : Cape Dory 36 Vs. Niagra 35 or Other....is a Full Keel and

    I can't find a similar review from them of the Cape Dory 36. Anecdotally the Cape Dory's I've seen have had more gelcoat cracks than other boats their age. +1 for 31Seahorse's point about draft, but the Niagara only draws 2" more than the Cape Dory, so no big distinction there, and either is probably ok at around 5'.

  7. Rebuilding a Cape Dory 36

    Rebuilding a Cape Dory 36. Far Reach in Round Bay, St John, USVI in Jan 2022 seven years after launch. Cape Dory owners will instantly recognize the hull and cabin top. But, a closer look reveals many changes. She has a nearly 7-inch bulwarks with integrated hawes-holes and 30-inch stanchions. She has a much longer traditional bowsprit and a ...

  8. CDSOA, Inc. -- CD36 Survey

    Under power, the Cape Dory 36 exceeds seven knots at cruising rpm and moves without fuss. Noise level is low in the cockpit and below. Under sail, with wind speeds between fifteen and eighteen knots, we carried 100% genoa, staysail and full main. The boat is stiff, but control was finger light on all headings.

  9. The Third Quarter: Cape Dory 36 & Robinhood 36 Sailboats

    The Robinhood 36 is pretty much the same boat as the Cape Dory 36 - glassed in the CD hull mold - but all of them were built after 1991, when Cape Dory morphed into Robinhood, so they are a teeny bit modified. Here is a great page on the Cape Dory Owners Association site, reviewing the history of Cape Dory and the transition to Robinhood ...

  10. CDSOA, Inc. -- RH36 Legacy

    As we were ready to buy the ultimate and last boat - a used Cape Dory 36, the luxury tax did a number on all the boatyards in the Northeast, closing down most of them. ... Finding a used Cape Dory 36 was almost-impossible. Everyone seemed to be looking for one. And, then one day Dave Perry of Robinhood called, me. I remember his words exactly ...

  11. 1982 Cape Dory 36

    The boat is beautiful and in good shape, but now I know the dirty hard to reach places need to be reached. I'll slowly replace all the pressurized water lines. Note to self.....keep diesel tanks full at every opportunity. The wind ain't always blowing. Semper Fi, SSgtPitt. 1982 36' Cape Dory. "All or Nothin' ".

  12. CAPE DORY 36: Reviews, Specifications, Built, Engine

    If you are a boat enthusiast looking to get more information on specs, built, make, etc. of different boats, then here is a complete review of CAPE DORY 36. Built by Cape Dory Yachts and designed by Carl Alberg, the boat was first built in 1978. It has a hull type of Long Keel and LOA is 11.01. Its sail area/displacement ratio 15.67.

  13. CDSOA, Inc. -- CD36

    Years Built. 1978 - 1990. Nr. Built. 165. The flagship of our line is the Cape Dory 36. This fine yacht was designed from the keel up by Carl Alberg to provide the maximum combination of comfort and performance in a yacht of this size. The standard 36 is Cutter rigged, and is powered by a 4-cylinder diesel auxiliary. She has 6 berths, carries ...

  14. Santorin Bluewater Sailboat

    Outside of Cape Dory's pocket cruiser choices of 30 feet and under, the Bluewater Sailboat Cape Dory 36 is the most popular. Perhaps this is owing to their versatility as superb offshore boats as well as weekend and coastal cruising vessels. LOA: 36′ 2″. LWL: 27′ 0″.

  15. Review of Cape Dory 36

    The immersion rate is defined as the weight required to sink the boat a certain level. The immersion rate for Cape Dory 36 is about 179 kg/cm, alternatively 1006 lbs/inch. Meaning: if you load 179 kg cargo on the boat then it will sink 1 cm. Alternatively, if you load 1006 lbs cargo on the boat it will sink 1 inch.

  16. Rebuilding a Cape Dory 36 Part III

    This is Part III of a multi-part series describing the rebuilding of our 1982 Cape Dory 36. In Part I ( PS November 2022 ), I described important steps we took to ensure the highest chance of successfully rebuilding our boat. Part II ( PS December 2022) described how we went about gutting the interior and then designing and installing a new ...

  17. Exploring the Timeless Beauty and Performance of the Cape Dory 36 Sailboat

    When it comes to classic sailboats that have stood the test of time, the Cape Dory 36 is a true gem. Known for its timeless beauty, exceptional performance, ... 1 Exploring the Timeless Beauty and Performance of the Cape Dory 36 Sailboat. 1.1 Introduction. 1.2 ...

  18. Cape Dory 36 boats for sale

    1979 Cape Dory 36 ft. US$37,000. BVI Yacht Sales LTD | Bolans, Antigua and Barbuda. Request Info. <. 1. >. * Price displayed is based on today's currency conversion rate of the listed sales price. Boats Group does not guarantee the accuracy of conversion rates and rates may differ than those provided by financial institutions at the time of ...

  19. CAPE DORY 36 KTH

    It takes into consideration "reported" sail area, displacement and length at waterline. The higher the number the faster speed prediction for the boat. A cat with a number 0.6 is likely to sail 6kts in 10kts wind, a cat with a number of 0.7 is likely to sail at 7kts in 10kts wind. KSP = (Lwl*SA÷D)^0.5*0.5

  20. Cape Dory 30

    All Multihulls New Sailboats Sailboats 21-30ft Sailboats 31-35ft Sailboats 36-40ft Sailboats Over 40ft Sailboats Under 21feet used_sailboats. How to Sell Your Boat. Cal 2-46: A Venerable Lapworth Design Brought Up to Date ... Sailboat Reviews; Sailboats 21-30ft; Cape Dory 30 Our pick of these boats is a cutter-rigged late model with full-width ...

  21. Exploring the Timeless Beauty and Performance of the Cape Dory 36 Sailboat

    Exploring the Timeless Beauty and Performance of the Cape Dory 36 Sailboat Introduction. When it comes to classic sailboats that have stood the test of time, the Cape Dory 36 is a true gem. Known for its timeless beauty, exceptional performance, and solid construction, this sailboat continues to capture the hearts of sailing enthusiasts worldwide.