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Salt in our Blood: 150 years of the RNZYS

RNZYS

Ivor Wilkins describes it like an archaeological dig, sifting through the various layers to interpret 150 years of history of the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron.

What Wilkins has produced in Salt in our Blood  is a richly-illustrated, 464 page, coffee table publication worthy of the club's proud history, dating back to the foundations of the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron in 1871.

Putting the book together was a monumental task, and involved combing through 14,000 items which had been transferred, rather haphazardly, onto CD-roms, hundreds of spidery, hand-written accounts dating back to the mid-1800s and countless interviews with those involved over the last 60 years.

"I would like to say all of the records were well organised but it was like stumbling through a dark forest and finding little treasures here, there and everywhere," Wilkins said.

"I was hoping the project would be done in two years. We'd allowed three and it took all three of those years and, even then, it was a bit of a push in the end to get it done."

There were a few minor skeletons rattling in the cupboard: employees with fingers in the till; members poaching oysters; causing a ruckus in quiet anchorages; chasing livestock; shots fired in the clubrooms; hooking the piecart to passing trams; the time it took for the Squadron to admit women as members. 

But what resonates more throughout is the hard work many put in to building the club and the sport in this country. Wilkins is careful to balance this and the contribution of the broad membership throughout Salt in our Blood  with the success the club achieved internationally.

RNZYS

It's not hyperbole to suggest the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron is the most successful yacht club in this country, having won anything and everything from the America's and Admirals Cups through to the One Ton Cup and Olympic titles.

"To a large degree, the story of the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron is the story of New Zealand yachting," Wilkins said. "That's not to claim that every major campaign was won by Yacht Squadron campaigns but most of them were and almost all of them involved Squadron members in some way or other. 

"I think our trophy cabinet is unrivalled in the world. If not, it would rank alongside the other major yacht clubs and it's something our members can be very proud of.

"What did come as a surprise to me was the extent to which the Squadron helped lay the groundwork for New Zealand’s Olympic success... and t he Squadron also took a leadership role in the establishment of the New Zealand Yachting Federation, without which Olympic participation could not take place."

Salt in our Blood is available from the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron's shop (when the club reopens) and online here .

RNZYS

The following is an edited extract from Salt in our Blood , tracing the origins of the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron in 1871.

For the best part of a century and half, the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron has taken 1871 as the date earlier faltering efforts at setting up a yacht club finally took hold. Part of this conviction arises from a club legend recounted by Noel Holmes in his book Century of Sail , published in 1971 as an official history of the RNZYS. With some equivocation, he relates that after the 1871 Anniversary Regatta prizegiving, a group of keen yachtsmen gathered at the Thames Hotel and decided that a one-day regatta every 12 months was not sufficient for their needs.

Urged out onto the street at the 11 p.m. closing time, members of the group continued their deliberations under the light of a gas lamp. And thus, the legend goes, the Auckland Yacht Club was born anew.

Regrettably, no documentary evidence has been unearthed to fix the date of this meeting or identify its participants. That does not mean it did not happen, however. Many a lasting enterprise — both magnificent and madcap — has originated in a bar-room conversation, or its post-eviction resumption. But something more tangible and formal than dim memories of an alcohol-fuelled, gas-lit meeting would clearly be helpful.

It is entirely possible that some documentation recording a formal follow-up to this discussion went up in flames in one of the two fires that destroyed the club’s early records. However, if such a meeting was convened and came to anything, it appears the news was not shouted from the rooftops. No newspaper accounts have been discovered announcing the establishment or revival of the Auckland Yacht Club in 1871. Given the previous encouragement by the Auckland newspapers for a club, one imagines such news would have been broadcast with enthusiasm.

The 1872 Anniversary Regatta would have been the perfect opportunity for a newly-established yacht club to show its colours. But, throughout the extensive and fulsome coverage — ‘success beyond the most sanguine expectation and a regatta on a scale of magnificence such as has never been witnessed previously in New Zealand waters’ ( Auckland Star , January 29, 1872) — no mention is made of the Auckland Yacht Club. Six members of the much-praised 1872 regatta committee featured on the 1859 membership list of the Auckland Yacht Club and could be assumed to have been prime candidates for instigating a new club, but there is no evidence of that.

However, there is evidence of a continued determination to extend yacht racing beyond the annual Anniversary Regatta. In February 1872, a race was organised for yachts over 5 and under 10 tons with vague links to the AYC.

Two of the moving forces behind this event were J. Dacre and John Waymouth, both of whom were associated with the club. Furthermore, the rules of the AYC were used to govern the race, but newspaper accounts do not explicitly identify this as an AYC event.

Thus, whatever seeds had been planted in 1871 apparently lay, if not dormant, at least publicly invisible through much of the ensuing summer. The onset of autumn in March 1872, however, saw a sudden flurry of excitement in the newspaper columns about the formation of an Auckland Yacht Club.

‘It has often struck us with surprise that with our fine harbour and noble estuary, and our many other advantages, we have not long before started a yachting club,’ prodded the Daily Southern Cross on March 11, 1872. Going on to list the manifold qualifications and benefits, not least the impetus a club would provide to the boatbuilding industry, the editorial continues:

‘We believe that many are anxious to become members of such a club, and that it is only the waiting for some one to take the initiative that prevents it from being un fait accompli .’

Sure enough, the very next day, a ‘good attendance’ of gentlemen gathered at the Star Hotel in the city under the chairmanship of John Waymouth, where a motion was proposed and carried to establish a club to be called the Auckland Yacht Club.

RNZYS

Not everyone was impressed by this development. A curmudgeonly letter appeared in the New Zealand Herald on March 13, under the cryptic signature R.Y.Y.C. Expressing the belief that the Daily Southern Cross ‘stands alone in its condition of astonishment’ at the absence of a yacht club, the correspondent said that a city that failed to support a boat club decently (a reference to rowing) was scarcely likely to do better with a yacht club.

Perhaps judging from past experience, the writer doubted a yacht club would last more than two consecutive years, and even more cuttingly cast doubts on the quality of the Auckland fleet. ‘I am unable to call to mind the names of more than two or three of our vessels which could fairly be dignified with the name of yacht.’

Nor did he believe there were enough people with the time or means to go in for yachting. ‘Yachting,’ he lectured, ‘is essentially an expensive amusement, and a yacht club, to be worthy of the name, should be conducted in a liberal spirit and not be in an impecunious condition.’ Bringing his arguments to a withering crescendo, the writer concluded with the scornful advice not to ‘make ourselves ridiculous by attempting impossibilities’.

Fortunately, having answered the call to action, the believers were not deterred by the apparent impossibility of their task. On March 22, at the Thames Hotel, a meeting of the Auckland Yacht Club under the chairmanship of James Stoddart accepted the draft rules and admitted several new members. Further proceedings were adjourned for a week. This time Thomas Henderson was in the chair and Stoddart was elected treasurer. H.E. Ellis was appointed honorary secretary and John Waymouth and G.S. Graham named as auditors. A further meeting for the following week was set to elect the Commodore, Vice Commodore and committee, but there are no follow-up reports of any such election taking place.

On April 18, however, another spark of life. The Auckland Star was ‘greatly gratified to learn that very great success is attending the organisation of the new Yacht Club. Over forty members have already been enrolled, and the list includes a large proportion of the principal merchants and other leading people in the city.’

The newspaper scribe then seems overcome with emotion, gushing that ‘there is something inexpressibly delightful in reclining with dignity, making the wind the minister of our pleasure when lightly skimming over the surface’ of the sea. This is followed by a swooning, if not slightly worrying, spiel about the romance of sailing as ‘angels’ enveloped in clouds of muslin gaze into the skipper’s eyes, or rest for support on his ‘manly buzzum’.

Perhaps understandably exhausted after such an excess of emotion, the paper trail goes cold throughout the ensuing winter, until at last on September 16 it comes to life again in the form of a notice in the Daily Southern Cross announcing: ‘The Annual Meeting [author emphasis] of the Members of the Auckland Yacht Club will be held at the club-room, Thames Hotel, This Evening at 7.30.’ The purpose of the meeting would be the election of officers for the following season and any other business.

RNZYS

The next day, the New Zealand Herald published an account of the meeting. William Aitken was elected Commodore, Charles K. Roskruge Vice Commodore, James Stoddart treasurer, H.J. Ellis honorary secretary, and G.S. Graham and John Waymouth auditors. The committee comprised T. Niccol, J.B. Graham, Thomas Henderson, D. Oxley and J. Marshall.

The paper reported the club had 30 members and said the rules were read and adopted. Displaying a somewhat alarming predilection for calling one meeting after another, the proceedings were adjourned for yet another conclave ‘in a few days’ to arrange the preliminaries for the opening day of the season.

This event duly took place in November, with eight yachts in attendance and the Commodore’s flag flying from John Waymouth’s yacht Energy . The little fleet formed a procession around the harbour until Energy hove to, whereupon the remaining yachts solemnly saluted as they passed and in turn raised three hearty cheers. The Auckland Yacht Club was launched with all due pomp and ceremony.

The momentum continued into December, when the Shipping Intelligence column of the Daily Southern Cross published two items of interest. The first was an announcement that the yachts of the AYC were under orders to assemble the following Saturday at 2 p.m. for the purpose of proceeding on a cruise. The Commodore’s flag would be hoisted on board the yacht Spray .

The second item was to report the results of a match for £10 a side between the new yacht Fleetwing and the yacht Sabrina , both flying AYC colours. Fleetwing , built by Charles Bailey, won handily, but more to the point the match once again demonstrated the AYC’s determination not to be hostage to the Anniversary Regatta.

As to its precise genesis, the Annual Meeting of September 16, 1872 — as much as the charming story of the gas-lamp gathering — appears responsible for fixing the foundation in 1871. Why have an annual meeting unless it marks the passage of a year?

Certainly, every Annual Meeting of the Auckland Yacht Club and the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron thereafter takes its numerical order from the first AGM of 1872. Hence, by that logic the AGM of 1971 was the one hundredth, and that of 2021 the one hundred and fiftieth.

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The Defenders of the America’s Cup on behalf of the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron, re-launched Te Rehutai, their all-conquering boat from AC36 in a new livery and with huge changes all over whilst welcoming onboard elite cycling athletes that have undergone extensive testing to join the team.

There was almost a ‘first day at school’ feel dockside as Te Rehutai splashed. The smiles on the crew member’s faces masked an apprehension but belied the excitement at getting the most powerful America’s Cup yacht (to date) back on the water and back into commission.

For many it was their first time on AC75, but Emirates Team New Zealand is staffed equally with apex sailors of long Cup experience. Nathan Outteridge, the alternate helm with Pete Burling was one of those jumping onboard for the first time and he was enthused saying: “Yeah it was really cool. Obviously, I watched the boat sail around a lot a few years ago and had heaps of sailing on the AC40 lately, but nothing really compares to these beasts. They’re so big and so powerful and…fortunately for me it wasn’t very windy, so it was nice to sort of ease into it. The boats are still amazing how fast they go for such little wind and just the power of these boats is something that I haven’t experienced for a long time.”

royal nz yacht squadron

Te Rehutai docked out for its commissioning sail at 11.25am and once the double-skinned mainsail was attached, hoisted, tweaked and set with the lower battening, we got a first glimpse of the new trench arrangement with five pods on either side containing the following: In the aft two pods, the cyclors are housed, tucked in a super aero position with just the arches of their backs exposed above the pod-line. Immediately forward of the cyclors are the Flight Controllers – today it was Nick Burridge in the starboard pod and Blair Tuke in the port pod. Then come the helmsmen (Burling and Outteridge) sandwiched in a brilliant communications loop with their Trimmers (Josh Junior and Andy Maloney) in the furthest pod forward.

royal nz yacht squadron

So, in total, Te Rehutai is sailing in its current configuration with ten sailors onboard. For AC37 in Barcelona this will be reduced to eight under the current rule so presumably at some point the role of Trimmer and Flight Controller will need to be combined – or will Emirates Team New Zealand, the great innovators of the America’s Cup, come up with another solution?

royal nz yacht squadron

Much work has been done on the mast set-up by the Kiwis to both strengthen it for the lack of running backstays and develop their thinking further at the mast ball area. The mast rotation controls were still above deck as we saw in AC36 and at the clew area of the mainsail, the mast rams were hidden by a huge blocking plate of cloth that extended far beyond the leech line. The ram itself along the deck appeared relatively standard whilst the leech tensioner was attached the traveller by a doubled strop. As we have seen with the LEQ12 of the Kiwis, much attention has been paid to the sail controls and the AC75 mainsail was topped out at the head with a straight batten closing the double skins and a lot of time was spent on adjusting the Cunningham control. Whilst sailing, and even whilst stopped, huge creases could be seen filtering down to the mainsail tack, indicating quite extreme tensioning. One to watch from a recon perspective for sure.

royal nz yacht squadron

The Kiwis had a relatively light session today with five gybes, four foiling, and a tack that ended in displacement as the light breeze only offered really the chance for a shakedown sail. The coming days will see Te Rehutai stretched and at full kilter.

Nathan Outteridge, always terrific and open in interview gave a enthusiastic summary of the day that is worth recording here. Talking about the programme he said: “All the same principles apply, you know you’ve still got this three foil foiling monohull and all the twin skin main stuff all applies but it’s just the scale and it’s just the loads. You get used to looking at main loads of down at 3 tons or whatever and you’re well above that now…when you’re pulling stuff on, you can hear, you can feel the load, you can feel the power of these boats and that’s something that you probably don’t get at all in the AC40s or any other boat that I’ve sailed. It’s an incredibly complicated boat as well and so I think it’s a really good decision to bring the old girl back out with a bunch of changes on it and keep pushing the development of the systems and for me personally I think going straight from an AC40 into one of these is a huge jump so I’m glad I’ve had a good few months under my belt.”

royal nz yacht squadron

With new team members onboard, Nathan commented: “I think it’s fantastic we’ve got all the sailing team now out on the water. A lot of the guys have been training for 6-9 months probably even two years since the last America’s Cup, maintaining fitness and getting ready for today essentially. And a lot of our sailing (so far) has been just the four of us going out and it was great to go through the two boating and get more sailing team members on the water, but this is the real deal, this is getting all the cyclors involved learning about the whole hydraulic system that’s going to be a huge part moving forward. There’s been quite a few rule changes on how all the systems work and so yeah this is…a perfect testing boat for us to just keep that development happening.”

The coming weeks and months are going to be fascinating. Emirates Team New Zealand joins Alinghi Red Bull Racing and New York Yacht Club American Magic in re-commissioning highly modified boats from AC36 and testing at full scale. It’s an interesting move. Is it the move that gaps them from the other teams in this America’s Cup cycle? Only time will tell.

Welcome back Te Rehutai.

royal nz yacht squadron

Recon Unit Notes:  The AC75 came out of the shed at 09.19 and was rigged and ready to be lifted into the water at 10.05. The crew meeting run by Ray Davies was held in the same place on the centre finger of the pens with the whole team within ear shot. The meeting finished with words from Peter Burling and Curly Salthouse.

At 11.25 the yacht was towed from her berth out into the middle of the fairway and the headboards were plugged in. By 11.47 the mainsail was in its lock and the team ran through the sail control systems, checking the Cunningham and outhaul throw. The J2 was hoisted and in its lock by 13.04, here the team did similar things testing the Cunningham throw and jib leads (unseen as they are below deck). With less than 7 knots from the southwest the tow line was passed across and the race yacht was taken on a small tow down towards the Rangitoto light. Still on tow she gybed and dropped her tow, sailed for about 10 min with one good gybe and one full splash down tack. She now stopped and had chase 1 alongside at 14.13, settings were played with on the clew of the jib, and both ends of the foot of the mainsail.

At 14.31 Te Rehutai left chase 1 and self-started in 8-9 knots of SW breeze on a long-ish run North along the east coast Bays, only 2 gybes in this session were observed. She stopped and had the chase boat alongside at 14.58 with sails down and being towed home to arrive at the dock downtown at 15.50.

Probably the perfect conditions to dial in settings and start getting familiar with her operation.

Onboard today:

Helms:  Nathan Outteridge / Pete Burling

Trimmers:  Josh Junior / Andy Maloney

Flight Control:  Nick Burridge / Blair Tuke

Power Group:  Simon van Velthoven / Marius van der Pol / Louis Sinclair / Louis Crosby

Sails Used:

M1 : 3 hours 7 minutes

J1: 1 hour 55 minutes

Manoeuvres:

Total Tacks:  1 – 1 touchdown

Total Gybes:  5 – 4 foil-to-foil, 1 touch & go.

Take-off:   90° TWA (True Wind Angle) Speed not recorded

Recon Comments:  1 tow-up, 3 self. Puffy, light breeze, made it look hard.

Conditions:  Weather AM: Fine, light breeze. PM: 10% cloud. Fine, 23°c. Sea-state: Calm/slight (PM)

Dock Out:  1125  Dock In:  1550

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Steve Cornwell

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The man who holds the key to the America's Cup

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royal nz yacht squadron

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royal nz yacht squadron

Aaron Young is the holder of the key to one of the world’s hottest sporting properties.

As commodore of the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron, Young has the key to the safe that holds the key to the case that holds the America’s Cup.

It’s on him at all times, day and night. Except for right now.

We’re sitting in the Members Lounge of the Squadron – once the room that housed the world’s oldest sporting trophy, until it was clobbered by a sledgehammer in 1997 – and it’s raining so heavily, you can no longer see the Auckland Harbour Bridge right outside the window.

Young is patting the pockets of his trousers. Then he remembers he’s entrusted the key to Cooper, one of the younger staff members, so the Auld Mug could make an off-site visit with Emirates Team New Zealand chairman, Sir Stephen Tindall.

When the key is back in his care, he proudly shows it to me – an impressive chunk of old brass almost the length of his hand. “It’s pretty serious, not like a car key you leave in your pocket,” he says.

It’s quite a rigmarole to unlock the Cup from its alarmed, bulletproof glass housing; a process that requires a few of staff. “The security is a lot tighter than it used to be,” Young says.

He bears a lot more responsibility than just custodian of the prized silverware. Especially in this year, one of the biggest in the Squadron’s illustrious history, as it celebrates its 150 th anniversary on top of hosting the America’s Cup.

“We certainly didn’t plan it this way,” laughs Young, who’s not complaining. He was “right amongst it” in Bermuda on board a Team NZ chase boat four years ago, when Peter Burling’s crew whipped the Auld Mug out of Oracle’s hands.

At 48, he’s one of the youngest commodores to have ever sat in the throne-like chair in the auspicious Committee Room, and part of a new generation in the RNZYS – including, waiting in the wings, the first-ever female commodore in the Squadron’s history.

royal nz yacht squadron

“We’re growing in the right areas, moving away from the exclusive old boys’ club that the Squadron was traditionally perceived to be,” Young says.

Regarded as one of the most prestigious, and most successful, sailing clubs in the world – the only club, it maintains, to have won every major yachting race on the globe – the Squadron now boasts its highest-ever membership of 4000.

The number of women and young people joining up continues to buck the trend of many sports clubs who are losing members.

The America’s Cup, of course, has had a lot to do with it.

Aaron Young was born into one of New Zealand’s great sailing dynasties. His grandfather, Jim Young, was one of the country’s leading yacht designers, as well as an accomplished sailor and boat builder.

Up until he died last year, aged 94, Jim could often be found in Cobweb Corner in the Squadron’s ballroom – sharing old stories with other august members.

Jim Young had a huge impact on his grandson’s early sailing career. “I was sailing dinghies and he would chase me up the harbour in a tinny, yelling ‘Hike harder! Work harder!’,” Aaron Young recalls.

Well ahead of his time, Jim Young designed a yacht with a canting keel (which helps a boat stay upright) back in the late 1950s – a move which put him offside with traditionalists at the Squadron. He later chuckled at the fact his grandson, as commodore of the very same yacht club, had bought a Melges 40 – a high-performance canting keeler.

royal nz yacht squadron

The commodore bought his racing yacht, Checkmate, out of Europe and convinced three mates to do the same, so there’s now be a racing fleet in Auckland.

“Part of my goal as commodore is to enhance club sailing. The reason New Zealand is so strong in the America’s Cup, ocean racing and the Olympics is because we have good grassroots club sailing,” he says.

“I love the boat, but it’s hard work. Running a racing campaign, and a business and being a commodore of the largest club in the country is time consuming.” A director of a number of companies, he’s also a husband and dad to two young kids.

Young races Checkmate every Wednesday night, and last weekend finished second at Kawau Island for the 150 th Squadron Weekend. Jim Young would no doubt have been proud.

In his early 20s, Aaron Young sailed Pied Pipers against Gillian Williams – now the Squadron’s first female rear commodore (third in the chain of command behind the commodore and vice commodore). In 2024, the Auckland lawyer is expected to become the first woman to fill the commodore’s role in the club’s 153 years.

“It’s long overdue,” Young says. “I’ve known Gill for a while, and she’s a very good sailor and she’ll be great in the role.”

If Team NZ successfully defend the America’s Cup in March, you won’t see Commodore Young on the final race day. He will squirrel himself away in a secret location – the subterfuge all part of one of the Cup’s many mysterious traditions.

One of Young’s close friends, Steve Mair, was the Squadron’s commodore in 2017. Mair was below the decks of Imagine, the superyacht of Team NZ principal Matteo di Nora, on Bermuda’s Great Sound for the final race of the America’s Cup. Boat staff stood guard around the deck, ready to kick any unwanted packages into the sea – the first challenge received once the winner crosses the finish line must be accepted as the Challenger of Record.

royal nz yacht squadron

Young – then the Squadron’s rear commodore – was on a Team NZ chase boat with long-time team supporters Tindall and Bob Field. “It was very emotional – seeing people who’d been with the team for 30-odd years – the tears of joy were so real,” Young says.

“It’s very different being the defender, especially in Auckland. All eyes are on you. And there are more complications. There’s so much that goes on behind the scenes. It’s almost a relief for the team to go sailing at the end of it.”

As the holder of the America’s Cup, the Squadron sign off everything in the Cup protocol – the rules that bind the competition – and manage the licensing and protection of trademarks, including the name and the image of the trophy.

The Squadron also took the Auld Mug on a nationwide tour after it returned to New Zealand. Young accompanied the Cup from Hawkes Bay to Oamaru, and has an enduring memory of its arrival in Picton with hometown hero and Team NZ grinder, Joe Sullivan.

“We were on the interisland ferry with the Cup on the bow, and boats came to greet us,” Young says. “Joe expected a few 100 people waiting to see it. But there were 7000 – he had tears in his eyes walking off the ferry.

royal nz yacht squadron

“In Greymouth we took the Cup to a pub on a Friday night and sat it on the bar. I don’t know if the New York Yacht Club would have liked it much, but we wanted to show it off to New Zealand.”

He wanted to take it on tour last year too, but Covid-19 got in the way.

The global pandemic threatened to be the party pooper in the Squadron’s 150 th birthday. It forced the cancellation of the Youth America’s Cup, which had 19 mixed-gender national crews from around the world. “That was a pretty significant disappointment,” Young says.  

It’s decimated the fleets of superyachts that would have lined up in two regattas over the next fortnight.  

Next week is the Millennium Cup regatta in the Bay of Islands, which has five sailing superyachts entered. The following week is the Mastercard Superyacht regatta, four days of racing in the Hauraki Gulf expecting eight sailing yachts and three motor yachts.

“Two years ago, we would have been expecting around 150 superyachts here this summer. Now we have a third of that number,” he says. “We’re still trying to get a few more boats through from the islands. But we have to respect where New Zealand is at in terms of the worldwide situation.”

They’ve also had to pull the plug on the Sydney-Auckland ocean race. 

Other events, though, are still going ahead as planned, including the Bridge-to-Bean race on February 28 – a new event encouraging all dinghies and foiling craft to race from the Harbour Bridge to the Bean Rock Lighthouse.  

At the other end of the time scale, it’s the 100 th anniversary of the Lipton Cup – New Zealand sailing’s oldest trophy – donated to the Ponsonby Cruising Club by the five-time America’s Cup challenger Sir Thomas Lipton and made by the same silversmith as the America’s Cup.

The Squadron joins Ponsonby in hosting the regatta for mullet boats on March 20. The winner of the very first race – the 108-year-old Valeria – will be on the start line.

Young is expecting a big crowd of members in the Squadron this weekend to watch the first races of the Prada Cup final between INEOS Team UK and Luna Rossa Prada Pirelli on the ballroom’s big screens.

“It’s quite a neat atmosphere. You’re sitting downstairs and you look up above to the mezzanine and there’s the America’s Cup sitting upstairs. It’s kind of a weird connection,” he says.

While rumours swirl around the waterfront Team NZ could take the Cup away from New Zealand if they successfully defend it, Young’s focus right now is making sure that under his watch, upstairs is exactly where it stays.

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ROYAL NEW ZEALAND YACHT SQUADRON AND EMIRATES TEAM NEW ZEALAND LAUNCH BRAND NEW ELLIOTT 7 FLEET

Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron and Emirates Team New Zealand launch brand new Elliott 7 Fleet

It’s been 14 years since the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron (RNZYS) launched 10 Elliott 7s for the Mastercard Youth Training Programme, and with that fleet now safely delivered to their new owners at Bucklands Beach Yacht Club (BBYC), the time has come to launch the brand new boats.

Gifted by Emirates Team New Zealand to support the program that has successfully created world class athletes, including some who are now part of Emirates Team New Zealand, the brand new fleet of Elliott 7s have arrived at their new berths where the next generation of elite athletes will carve their yachting future.

Grant Dalton, CEO of Emirates Team New Zealand announced to RNZYS members that the new fleet will once again deliver opportunities to young sailors keen to embark on a world of professional sailing.

“We are especially proud and excited about the launch of the new fleet of Elliot 7’s,” explained Grant Dalton.

royal nz yacht squadron

“As an organisation, our core objective is always firmly focused on one thing - winning the America’s Cup for New Zealand. However, it is always vitally important to continue looking beyond that objective - to the future and ensuring the pipeline of top level kiwi sailing talent is full. So, investing in the new fleet is an investment in New Zealand’s future sailing talent through the world class RNZYS Youth Training Programme.”

The new fleet, fitted out with brand new North Sails and the latest in high performance technology, will not only be utilised for the Mastercard Youth Training Program and the Musto Performance Programme, but also for world class international and local Match Racing events. In addition to this, the fleet will also race on Tuesday evenings as part of the ongoing E7 series, and the support the RNZYS ongoing work to support schools and youth within the community.

Commissioned by Greg Elliott and built under supervision at MConaghy Boats in China, and were fitted out at Yachting Development with the support of past Commodore, Ian Cook and some of the Emirates Team New Zealand shore crew.

royal nz yacht squadron

RNZYS Vice Commodore and Chair of Sailing, Gillian Williams was part of the delivery crew who sailed the old fleet to BBYC on the afternoon of Friday the 9th February.

“The fleet has done us proud and has produced world class sailors who have gone on to achieve great success around the world and we are excited to now have BBYC take on the boats, so they can enhance their development programs,” said Williams.

“It was time for RNZYS to upgrade with more international sailing and match racing events coming to the shores of the Waitemata Harbour. Now there will be 20 one-design Elliott 7s in Auckland, which means even more opportunities for sailors, and interclub regattas. It’s an exciting time,” continued Williams.

Sailors such as Gavin Brady, Leonard Takahashi, Nick Egnot-Johnson, Megan Thomson, Celia Willison and current Hardy Cup champion helm, Josh Hyde, have gone through the RNZYS Youth Training Program and have achieved results on the world stage ever since.

royal nz yacht squadron

Dalton continued by saying “this is the kind of legacy that we are determined to leave to the people of Auckland, and New Zealand. Having more one-design match racing boats means greater opportunities for everyone.” 

Dalton also shared the news ,with those gathered to celebrate the launch, that Emirates Team New Zealand will donate $500,000 to the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron International Sailing Fund to ensure world leading sailing opportunities on the international stage are available for our membership moving forward.  

Gillian Williams commented ‘that this incredible donation by the team further reinforces their commitment to ensuring the success of our programs and to ensure our sailors can compete on the world stage – we are incredibly grateful to Grant and their team’.

Andrew Aitken, Commodore of RNZYS, is thrilled to be leading the club through the launch of the new Elliott 7 fleet, which is part of the ongoing reset journey the club has undertaken.

royal nz yacht squadron

“The new fleet of Emirates Team New Zealand Elliott 7’s is a significant milestone for our club, as is the generous contribution to our International Sailing Fund, and these generous donations by Grant Dalton and Emirates Team New Zealand ensure the successful future of our youth offerings as we move forward. In addition to this, being able to have the existing fleet remain in Auckland will be beneficial for the entire sailing community, and we are looking forward to creating more events and racing with the fleets combined,” said Aitken.

“We aim to leave a legacy for the next generation of sailors, and this is an important step in this process,” continued Aitken.

Emirates Team New Zealand, who represent RNZYS, has the America’s Cup proudly on display for members and visitors alike to admire. The America’s Cup is the oldest sporting trophy in the world, and  have claimed the Auld Mug four  times - 1995, 2000, 2017 and most recently in 2021. Their goal is to successfully defend the America’s Cup for an unprecedented 3 rd time in a row in Barcelona in October of this year.

royal nz yacht squadron

$2m loss for America’s Cup sailing club: Royal NZ Yacht Squadron in financial trouble

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The Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron is having to find savings after being projected to post a big loss. Photo / Michael Craig

The Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron’s estimated trading loss for the last financial year has risen to almost $2 million as the club hunts for savings in a bid to “achieve long term sustainability”.

Auckland’s blue ribbon sailing club - known for its links to the America’s Cup - earlier this year reported it was looking at a between $1.4m and $1.6m loss.

It blamed the loss on the impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic and stormy weather in early 2023 and immediately started a “Reset” journey to turns its finances around.

In an update to members yesterday, the club said its five-month Reset journey had made “considerable progress” but that the estimated loss had also climbed.

“The financial loss for this year will be closer to $2m. This is higher than originally forecast due to the review and reset of our Fixed Asset Register,” Commodore Andrew Aitken wrote in the newsletter.

Much of the extra projected loss was due to asset write-offs, Aitken said.

The Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron building at Westhaven. Photo/Kellie Blizard

He said the club’s Reset Committee wrote off 247 assets no longer in the club’s possession as well as assets with a value below $2000 - totalling $467,489.

It also wrote down the value of boats owned by the club but which it is selling - including Elliott Fleet, Pembles, the Etchells and Phantoms - by a value of $240,199.

Aitken said other costs contributing to the loss included costs associated with training material, IT service losses of $33,480, sailing event losses worth $90,000 and a $110,000 loss designated as “members subscriptions and debtors adjustment”.

The next America's Cup regatta will be sailed in Barcelona far from New Zealand, despite Team NZ having the right to hold it locally. Photo /  Maria Muna

Media outlet Business Desk reported in March that unnamed sources suggested the club had also suffered membership losses because of its decision last year to allow the next America’s Cup to be sailed in Barcelona rather than Auckland.

Emirates Team NZ won the last America’s Cup in Auckland in 2021 but then argued it was not financially viable for the 2024 event to be held in New Zealand.

BusinessDesk said high-profile RNZYS members to have resigned over the Barcelona decision included original backer of NZ’s bids for the cup, Sir Michael Fay, Auckland KC Jim Farmer, Alan Sefton and Andrew Johns, who was the legal adviser for Fay’s three NZ bids.

Aitken, meanwhile, raised the possibility of a number of changes in members’ services in the newsletter update.

“Many of our members love the experience of dining or enjoying refreshments in our Members Bar,” he said.

However, the bar hasn’t broken even for a “number of years”, Aitken said.

Kiwis won't be able to witness the next America's Cup up close. Photo / America's Cup

To do so it will need to make an extra $700 in sales each day it is open.

As a result the club is going to survey members on what services they want and in the meantime has reduced the bar’s opening hours during winter from seven days a week to six.

The club is also consulting members on its club racing programme, Aitken said.

Aitken did not wish to comment when contacted by the Herald .

But he concluded his newsletter update to members by saying significant work is under way to “ensure that as we move forward, a sustainable business model is in place so that the club breaks even”.

“The Reset Committee are of the view that it will take a minimum of two years to reach this breakeven position, given the considerable amount of change that is required to do so,” he said.

“While breaking even before depreciation for the 2023/24 year is desirable, we recognise this is a substantial challenge with current forecasts showing significant work is still required to deliver this.”

royal nz yacht squadron

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royal nz yacht squadron

Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron Inc

Reception & Shop Hours: Monday – Friday / 830am – 5pm | Weekends / 9am – 4pm

Reception Phone: (09) 360-6800

Physical Address:  181 Westhaven Drive, Westhaven Marina, Auckland 1011

Postal Address: PO Box 46 182, Herne Bay, Auckland 1147, New Zealand

Website: www.rnzys.org.nz

Latitude: 36.50.14 S Longitude: 174.44.29E

RECEPTION Phone: 09 360 6800 Email: [email protected]

ACCOUNTS Phone: 09 965 5289 Email: [email protected] , [email protected]

SAILING OFFICE Phone: 09 360 6809 Email: [email protected]

SPONSORSHIP & MARKETING Phone: 09 360 6905 Email: [email protected]

MEMBERSHIP Phone: 09 360 6804 Email: [email protected]

LEARN TO SAIL Phone: 09 360 6809 Email:  [email protected]

EVENTS Phone: 09 360 6800 Email: [email protected]

MEMBER’S BAR Phone: 09 360 6814

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GENERAL MANAGER Sarah Wiblin Phone:  09 360 6805 Email: [email protected]

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MEMBERSHIP AND OFFER MANAGER Georgia Witt Mobile:  029 0202 0457 Email: [email protected]

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OPERATIONS MANAGER Cooper Hopman Phone:  09 360 6800 Mobile:  021 180 7031 Email: [email protected]

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EVENTS & ENGAGEMENT MANAGER Alexis Watts Phone: 027 272 9815 Email: [email protected]

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EXECUTIVE CHEF Campbell White Phone:  09 360 6831 Mobile:  027 2500 131 Email: [email protected]

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FINANCE MANAGER Frances Turrall Phone: 09 360 6800 Email: [email protected]

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MEMBERSHIP EXECUTIVE Beth Orton Phone: 027 555 9567 Email: [email protected]

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CLUB RACE MANAGER Brooke Adamson Mobile: 027 645 7788 Email: [email protected]

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PERFORMANCE SAILING MANAGER Zak Merton Phone: 022 576 2965 Email: [email protected]

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The Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron is New Zealand’s leading yacht club, with an illustrious history dating back to our formation in 1871. The RNZYS is still the official home of the America’s Cup after Emirates Team New Zealand, representing the RNZYS, defended the oldest sporting trophy in the world at the 36th America’s Cup in Auckland in 2021. The RNZYS has a wide range of events taking place to mark this momentous occasion. With thousands of races per calendar year, many social events and a Members Bar open seven days a week, we invite you to join us and enjoy what we have to offer.

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Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron Inc 181 Westhaven Drive, Westhaven Marina, Auckland 1011, New Zealand (09) 360-6800

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I ran a training course here. Great location. Great venue. Great staff. They offered for us to dine in the restaurant and what a smart decision to do so. I ordered a burger with limited expectations but I'd be hard pressed to think of a better burger I've had in recent memory. Similar reports from the rest of my trainees. Highly recommended!

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I've been going to RNZYS since I was a wee tike. My parents are sailing enthusiasts and consequently some of my earliest memories are hanging out in the member's lounge drinking raspberry lemonades and modeling the kid's clothes in the Line 7 fashion show! These days the squadron is a lot fancier - there's a full service restaurant upstairs (you can make reservations on their website) and a members only bar that has fantastic views of the harbour. There's a trophy room, where the America's Cup once was, and a huuuge hall appropriately decorated with nautical knick-knacks. Definitely worth considering if you're organizing an event - there's rooms of every size and they have a specific event coordinator.

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royal nz yacht squadron

Our Level 1 learn to sail course gives you all the basics you need to get your sailing journey started.

What to expect.

RNZYS Adult Learn to Sail Course is a Yachting New Zealand [internationally recognised] Level 1 sailing course. It has been set up for complete beginners who do not necessarily know one end of the boat from the other but have slight interest in either the water and water activities to simply learning a new skill to doing something out of their comfort zone The course format is either over 5 weeknights [5pm – 8:30pm], dinner included or two full days [weekend], lunch included. Over your time with us there will be a mixture of theory and practical sailing knowledge delivered by qualified YNZ instructors, in either our Elliott 7 (7m), Sonar (7m) or Farr MRX (10.2m) keelboats. Both the Elliott 7s and Sonars have 4 students per boat with 1 coach, the MRX has 7 students per boat with 1 coach.

What the course covers

During your Level 1 learn to sail course you will gain an understanding of safety on the water, basic navigation, boat maintenance and of course sailing skills;

  • Sailing manoeuvres [tacks and gybes]
  • Trimming sails
  • Points of sail
  • Rigging and de-rigging a yacht

What is included

Lunch or dinner is included and at the beginning of your course you’ll receive a one-month trial membership to the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron. You’ll be able to use the facilities and get a full taste of what being an active sailing member of the RNZYS is like!

On graduation you’ll receive a Yachting New Zealand Level 1 certificate.

The Sailing Office will provide help with the next stage of your journey: crew placement, join a Level 2 – Cruising, or Level 2 Race Crew Training course. You can even get involved volunteering in race management.

Which Level 1 Boat is Right For Me?

The MRX course is on a bigger and more stable boat, if you are nervous about sailing or around water, don’t want to get wet or are less mobile then this is the course for you. If you are looking at becoming a boat owner then the MRX course deals with more issues around boat ownership and systems on larger keelboats. The coach to student ratio is 1:6 with a qualified skipper as the coach.

The Elliott 7 course is on smaller more responsive boats; this can provide a steeper learning curve, the coach to student ratio is 1:4 with a younger Yachting NZ qualified keelboat coach on board, the course will be overseen by our Learn to sail manager. If you are more agile and confident around water this course is for you.

The Sonar fits nicely between the MRX and the Elliott 7. Sonars are a very safe, stable sailing boat, ideal for learning. They have been powered by an incredibly quiet discreet electric motor, which is used to manoeuvre the vessel in and out of the marina – it’s a very cool experience.  The coach to student Ratio is 1:4.

Click on the photos to see more 🙂

royal nz yacht squadron

Common Questions

Where do we meet.

Main foyer of the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron, 181 Westhaven Drive.

What should I wear?

The dress code for the RNZYS is closed footwear and no hats, tidy clothes will be fine.

For on the water you can normally just wear active clothes (shorts and t shirt) but you should aslso bring:

  • Warm jumper wool is best in case of cold weather
  • Warm jacket, wind and water proof if possible
  • Thermal top and bottom if possible because of cold weather
  • Drink bottle
  • Sailing gloves

Life Jackets are provided, but if you have your own you are welcome to use it. You will be sailing just outside the Yacht Squadron, for up to four hours at a time.

Will I get wet?

Most likely not, but it is possible. It’s always a good idea to bring a change of clothes for after sailing.

What if it's bad weather, will the course be cancelled?

If there is bad weather for one session there will be a theory session, if there is bad weather twice in a course another day will be rescheduled. You will be notified by phone if the course is rescheduled.

Can the boats capsize?

No. Our boats are keelboats and are impossible to capsize.

How much of the course is theory verse practical?

Approximately two thirds of the time is on the water/practical and one third is theory.

Should I do an Elliott 7 or Farr MRX course?

The MRX course is on a bigger and more stable boat, if you are nervous about sailing or around water, don’t want to get wet or are less mobile then this is the course for you. If you are looking at becoming a boat owner then the MRX course deals with more issues around boat ownership and systems on larger keelboats. The coach to student ratio is 1:7 with a qualified skipper as the coach.

The Elliott 7 course is on smaller more responsive boats; this can provide a steeper learning curve, the coach to student ratio is 1:4 with a younger Yachting NZ qualified keelboat coach on board, the course will be overseen our Learn to sail manager. If you are more agile and confident around water this course is for you.

Are the coaches qualified?

For the Elliott 7 course the coaches are senior sailors from the RNZYS Youth Training and Performance Programmes, often these are some of the best racing sailors in the country. They are all Yachting New Zealand Keelboat coach qualified, the course will be overseen by our Learn to Sail Manager who is an experienced coach. For the MRX course the coach is a fully qualified YNZ keelboat coach.

Does RNZYS offer RYA courses?

We run Yachting New Zealand courses YNZ Level 1 seamanship and YNZ Level 2 seamanship; RYA (Royal Yachting Association) is the British equivalent of YNZ. Both are endorsed and recognised internationally by the sailing governing body ‘World Sailing’.

Will I get a certificate after my course?

Provided you pass the course (most do) you will get a YNZ certificate which is Internationally recognised by World Sailing.

How much wind is too much to sail in?

Generally our wind limit is 20 knots, but this also depends also on sea state and other factors.

Should I do any preperation before the course?

You don’t need to but if you want to, checking the weather forecast and tides can help.

Will I be able to skipper a boat on my own after the course?

For a Level 1 course normally no if you had no prior experience. It is very different for different people though and depends a lot on your confidence. After a Level 2 course you will have all the information you need to skipper a boat safely yourself. Either way we do recommend you gain more experience and confidence as a crew before doing any long trips as a skipper.

How do I continue to sail after I finish the course?

We have a lots of frequent and cruising regattas at the club and we can help place you on a RNZYS member’s boat. We can also help you if you are looking to purchase your own yacht.

Should I become a member of RNZYS?

Yes! In fact if you sign up to a course you are already a member as the course includes one month membership to the RNZYS which allows you to use all the facilities at the club. After the month long free period you can decide if you wish to carry on the membership, which we strongly encourage you to do. As well as sailing, the RNZYS offers great dining in the member’s bars and quarterdeck restaurant, rooms for meetings, fantastic social functions, family events, use of Lidgard house at Kawau island and it is an all round great club.

Yes! In fact if you sign up to a course you are already a member as the course includes three months membership to the RNZYS which allows you to use all the facilities at the club. After three months you can decide if you wish to carry on the membership, which we strongly encourage you to do. As well as sailing, the RNZYS offers great dining in the member’s bars and quarterdeck restaurant, rooms for meetings, fantastic social functions, family events, use of Lidgard house at Kawau island and it is an all round great club.

Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron

Call us: 09 360 6809 or 021 593 482 Find us: 181 Westhaven Drive, Westhaven Marina, Auckland 1147 Email us: [email protected]

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COMMENTS

  1. Home

    The Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron is New Zealand's leading yacht club, with an illustrious history dating back to our formation in 1871. The RNZYS is still the official home of the America's Cup after Emirates Team New Zealand, representing the RNZYS, defended the oldest sporting trophy in the world at the 36th America's Cup in Auckland in 2021.

  2. Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron

    The Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron is a New Zealand yacht club, and the club behind New Zealand's America's Cup campaigns, under the guises of New Zealand Challenge and Team New Zealand. It held the America's Cup from 1995 until 2003, becoming in 2000 the first non-American holder to successfully defend the trophy.

  3. Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron (RNZYS)

    Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron (RNZYS), Auckland, New Zealand. 12,159 likes · 151 talking about this · 12,178 were here. New Zealand's leading yacht club and the official home of the America's Cup

  4. Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron

    Regatta. Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron. Event date: Thu 11 Apr 2024 - Sun 14 Apr 2024. The Auckland Three Kings Race is a 500 nautical mile challenge from Auckland up and around the Three Kings Islands and then back to Auckland finishing where you started. See all events. The Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron is the oldest and most successful ...

  5. Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron

    The Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron is a New Zealand yacht club, and the club behind New Zealand's America's Cup campaigns, under the guises of New Zealand Challenge and Team New Zealand. It held the America's Cup from 1995 until 2003, becoming in 2000 the first non-American holder to successfully defend the trophy. After Team New Zealand's victory in the 2017 event, the Royal New Zealand ...

  6. Salt in our Blood: 150 years of the RNZYS

    Issue date. 20 Oct 2021. Ivor Wilkins describes it like an archaeological dig, sifting through the various layers to interpret 150 years of history of the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron. What Wilkins has produced in Salt in our Blood is a richly-illustrated, 464 page, coffee table publication worthy of the club's proud history, dating back to ...

  7. The Revamped Te Rehutai: Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron's Defense

    The Defenders of the America's Cup on behalf of the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron, re-launched Te Rehutai, their all-conquering boat from AC36 in a new livery and with huge changes all over whilst welcoming onboard elite cycling athletes that have undergone extensive testing to join the team.

  8. Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron

    Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron, Home of the America's Cup is a spacious, multi-functional building at the foot of the Harbour Bridge in Westhaven Marina. Offering seven versatile function rooms to cater to any event whether it be a day meeting, gala dinner, wedding or cocktail party.

  9. The man who holds the key to the America's Cup

    As America's Cup holder, the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron, celebrates its 150th birthday, big changes are under sail - including a long-awaited first, writes Suzanne McFadden. by Suzanne McFadden 10/02/2021 29/01/2024. Share this: Share At 48, Aaron Young is one of the youngest commodores in the history of the Royal New Zealand Yacht ...

  10. Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron and Emirates Team New Zealand Launch

    It's been 14 years since the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron (RNZYS) launched 10 Elliott 7s for the Mastercard Youth Training Programme, and with that fleet now safely delivered to their new owners at Bucklands Beach Yacht Club (BBYC), the time has come to launch the brand new boats.

  11. Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron (RNZYS)

    Share your videos with friends, family, and the world

  12. About RNZYS

    Founded in 1871, The Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron is New Zealand's senior yacht club and home of the 36th Americas Cup! The RNZYS's reputation on the international yachting scene ensures it occupies a position of high prestige, nationally and internationally. The RNZYS has a strong commitment to training and in 1987 launched its Youth ...

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    RNZYS (Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron) 603 followers. 5mo. We are thrilled to announce that the much-loved Category 2, 500nm THREE KINGS RACE is making a grand comeback in 2024! Mark your ...

  14. Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron (RNZYS)

    Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron (RNZYS), Auckland, New Zealand. 12,148 likes · 166 talking about this · 12,118 were here. New Zealand's leading yacht club and the official home of the America's Cup

  15. Royal NZ Yacht Squadron appoints razor gang as $1.6m loss looms

    The Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron (RNZYS) is facing a trading loss of up to $1.6 million in the current financial year and is "immediately" reviewing its operations in a hunt for savings.Auckland's blue ribbon sailing club is blaming poor trading conditions caused by covid-19 and the impact of stormy weather in early 2023 for the projected loss of between $1.4m and $1.6m.However ...

  16. RNZYS Sailing School

    Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron. Call us: 09 360 6809 or 021 593 482 Find us: 181 Westhaven Drive, Westhaven Marina, Auckland 1147 Email us: [email protected] View Map

  17. America's Cup hangover? Royal NZ Yacht Squadron facing $2m loss

    Photo / Michael Craig. The Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron's estimated trading loss for the last financial year has risen to almost $2 million as the club hunts for savings in a bid to ...

  18. Contact Us

    Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron Inc. Reception & Shop Hours: Monday - Friday / 830am - 5pm | Weekends / 9am - 4pm Reception Phone: (09) 360-6800 Physical Address: 181 Westhaven Drive, Westhaven Marina, Auckland 1011 Postal Address: PO Box 46 182, Herne Bay, Auckland 1147, New Zealand Website: www.rnzys.org.nz Latitude: 36.50.14 S Longitude: 174.44.29E

  19. Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron

    2 reviews and 5 photos of Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron "I've been going to RNZYS since I was a wee tike. My parents are sailing enthusiasts and consequently some of my earliest memories are hanging out in the member's lounge drinking raspberry lemonades and modeling the kid's clothes in the Line 7 fashion show! These days the squadron is a lot fancier - there's a full service restaurant ...

  20. Level 1

    Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron. Call us: 09 360 6809 or 021 593 482 Find us: 181 Westhaven Drive, Westhaven Marina, Auckland 1147 Email us: [email protected]. View Map. Show All Courses; Book Level 1 Course; Book Level 2 Course; Book Race Crew Course; Terms and Conditions; Testimonials; Course Dates;

  21. 2024 America's Cup

    The Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron is again the defender of the America's Cup after its yacht Te Rehutai, owned and sailed by the Emirates Team New Zealand syndicate, was the successful defender in the 36th America's Cup, beating the challenger Luna Rossa, representing Circolo della Vela Sicilia, 7-3 in a first-to-seven series raced from 10 ...

  22. Купа на Америка

    Освен New York Yacht Club и Royal Perth Yacht Club, трофеят е печелен и от San Diego Yacht Club, Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron, Golden Gate Yacht Club и Société Nautique de Genève. Последният шампион от 2021 година са новозеландците от Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron.