What Do Those Golf Scoring Terms (Birdies, Bogeys, Pars) Mean?

So you're new to the game of golf and you keep hearing references to birdies and bogeys, eagles and pars. What are those things, anyway? What do those golf scoring terms mean ?

Those (and other terms) are all names for different types of scores on an individual golf hole.

Start With Par, Go From There to Understand Golf Score Names

When explaining golf scoring terms, start with par, because all the other names of golf scores are defined in relation to par. "Par" refers to the number of strokes an expert golfer is expected to need to complete the play of one hole on a golf course.

Golf holes of different lengths will require more or fewer strokes by a golfer. And regardless of length, the par number of a hole always allows for two putts. So a 150-yard hole is one on which the expert is expected to hit the green with his tee shot, take two putts, and, therefore, require three strokes to finish that hole. Such a hole is therefore called a par-3.

And every hole on a golf course is rated as either a par-3, a par-4 or a par-5 (par-6 holes also exist, but they are rare).

A very good golfer — or a very lucky golfer — might complete a hole in fewer strokes than the par (called "under par"). And of course, most of us are not "experts" at golf, and so on most holes we'll need more strokes than the par (called "over par").

That's where those other terms — birdies, eagles, bogeys, and so on — come into play. They describe a golfer's performance on a hole in relation to the hole's par:

  • A birdie is a score of 1-under par on a hole (for example, scoring 4 on a par-5).
  • A bogey is 1-over par on a hole.
  • An eagle is 2-under par on a hole.
  • A double bogey is 2-over par on a hole.
  • A double eagle (very rare) is 3-under par (also called an "albatross").
  • A triple bogey is 3-over par.

Given that a par-5 hole is the highest par most golfers will ever see, there is a limit to how far under par a golfer can go. But a hole-in-one — knocking the ball in the hole with your first shot — is also called an "ace." (On a par-5 hole, making an ace means a golfer is 4-under on that hole and, yes, golfers have a term for that, too: condor.)

Scores over par can keep going up, and you just keep adding to the prefix, as in quadruple bogey, quintuple bogey, and so on. Here's hoping that's knowledge you'll never need.

The Actual Number of Strokes That Result in These Golf Scores

Here's what these most-common golf scoring terms mean for holes with pars of 5, 4 and 3, in the actual number of strokes:

  • Double eagle: On a par-5, means you finished the hole in 2 strokes
  • Eagle: You finished the hole in 3 strokes
  • Birdie: You finished the hole in 4 strokes
  • Par: You finished the hole in 5 strokes
  • Bogey: You finished the hole in 6 strokes
  • Double bogey: You finished the hole in 7 strokes
  • Triple bogey: You finished the hole in 8 strokes
  • Double eagle: On a par-4, means you finished the hole in 1 stroke — a hole-in-one (very, very rare on par-4 holes)
  • Eagle: You finished the hole in 2 strokes
  • Birdie: You finished the hole in 3 strokes
  • Par: You finished the hole in 4 strokes
  • Bogey: You finished the hole in 5 strokes
  • Double bogey: You finished the hole in 6 strokes
  • Triple bogey: You finished the hole in 7 strokes
  • Double eagle: Double eagles are not possible on par-3 holes (a score of 3-under on a par-3 would be zero)
  • Eagle: You finished the hole in 1 stroke — a hole-in-one
  • Birdie: You finished the hole in 2 strokes
  • Par: You finished the hole in 3 strokes
  • Bogey: You finished the hole in 4 strokes
  • Double bogey: You finished the hole in 5 strokes
  • Triple bogey: You finished the hole in 6 strokes

Note that any hole-in-one or ace will be called by those terms, rather than by double eagle (on a par-4) or eagle (on a par-3). After all, why use double eagle or eagle when you can call it a hole-in-one?

Another note about the alternative term for "double eagle": Albatross is the preferred term in most of the golfing world; double eagle is the preferred term in the United States.

10 Tips to Mark a Golf Scorecard the Right Way

The 12 Best Carry-On Luggage of 2024, Tested and Reviewed

The 6 Best Women’s Golf Club Sets of 2024

The 9 Best Golf GPS Watches

The 8 Best Golf Putters of 2024

The 10 Best Golf Training Aids of 2024

Types of Golf Clubs: The Complete Guide

Meet the Irons: An Intro for Golf Beginners

The 9 Best Hybrid Golf Clubs

Which Clubs Should You Carry in Your Golf Bag?

How to Hold a Putter: Common Putting Grips and Their Pros and Cons

The 7 Best Golf GPS Apps of 2023 for Android and iPhone

Meet the Wedges: An Intro for Golf Beginners

The Best Golf Irons of 2024

The 9 Best Fanny Packs of 2024, Tested and Reviewed

The 9 Best Places to Buy Golf Clubs of 2024

Scottish Golf History

Your browser is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites. Learn how to update your browser

Bogey to Blow-Up

There is quite a history behind the golfing terms bogey, par, birdie, eagle and albatross.

Bogey and par were central to the development of handicapping, pioneered by the LGU . The modern meaning of three of the terms - bogey, birdie and eagle - comes from their use in USA.

Bogey Par Birdie Eagle Albatross   Condor

"Bogey" was the first stroke system, developed in England at the end of the 19th Century. The full history is given in Robert Browning's History of Golf 1955 .

In 1890 Mr Hugh Rotherham Secretary of the Coventry Golf Club conceived the idea of standardising the number of shots at each hole that a good golfer should take, which he called the 'ground score.'

GreatYarmouth01

A 'bogle' was a Scottish goblin as far back as the 16th Century and a Bogey-man was a widely used term for a goblin or devil. Golfers of the time considered they were playing a Mister Bogey when measuring themselves against the bogey score. This allowed the introduction of bogey competitions, which we would call handicap competitions or stablefords. 

On 2nd January 1892, The Field reported that 'a novelty was introduced in the shape of a bogey tournament for a prize. ... Fourteen couples started but the bogey defeated them all.'

In 1892, Colonel Seely-Vidal, the Hon Secretary of the United Servic es Club at Gosport, also worked out the 'bogey' for his course. The United Club was a services club and all the members had a military rank. They could not measure themselves against a 'Mister' Bogey or have him as a member, so 'he' was given the honorary rank of Colonel. Thus the term 'Colonel Bogey' was born. 

Later, in the middle of 20th century, bogey was used as the term of one above par.

Par is derived from the stock exchange term that a stock may be above or below its normal or 'par' figure. In 1870, Mr AH Doleman, a golf writer, asked the golf professionals David Strath and James Anderson, what score would win 'The Belt', then the winning trophy for 'The Open', at Prestwick, where it was first held annually from 1861 to 1870. Strath and Anderson said that perfect play should produce a score of 49 for Prestwick's twelve holes. Mr Doleman called this 'par' for Prestwick and subsequently Young Tom Morris won with a score of two strokes 'over par' for the three rounds of 36 holes.

TomMorrisJnr04

In 1911, the United States Golf Association (Men) of the day laid down the following very modern distances for determining par:

As golf developed, scores were coming down, but many old British courses did not adjust their courses or their bogey scores, which meant good golfers and all the professionals were achieving lower than a bogey score. This meant the US had an up-to-date national standard of distances for holes, while the British bogey ratings were determined by each club and were no longer appropriate for professionals. The Americans began referring to one over par as a bogey, much to the British chagrin.

By 1914, British golf magazines were agitating for a ratings system similar to the US. However the Great War 1914-18 intervened and it was not until 1925 that a Golf Unions' Joint Advisory Committee of the British Isles was formed to assign Standard Scratch Scores (SSS), to golf courses in Great Britain and Ireland. Today, this committee is known as the Council of National Golf Unions (CONGU). It is the Golf Unions of each country (and not the Royal and Ancient) who determine pars and handicaps.

"Birdie", meaning a score of one stroke under Par, comes from the early 20th century American slang term "bird", meaning anything excellent. The September 1911 edition of Maclean Magazine described a golf shot as - '"bird" straight down the course, about two hundred and fifteen yards.'  

The Country Club in Atlantic City lay claim to the first use of the word 'birdie' itself, as mentioned on the USGA website. In 1962 the US greenkeepers' magazine reported a conversation with A B Smith. He recounted that, in 1898/9, he and his brother, William P Smith, and their friend, George A Crump, who later built Pine Valley, were playing the par-four second hole at Atlantic City, when Ab Smith's second shot went within inches of the hole. Smith said "That was a bird of shot" and claimed he should get double money if he won with one under par, which was agreed. He duly holed his putt to win with one under par and the three of them thereafter referred to such a score as a "birdie". The Atlantic City Club date the event to 1903.

AtlanticCityCC Birdie

Sea Eagle Fife

Ab Smith ( see Birdie above ) said that his group referred to two under as an 'eagle'.

By 1919 the term was being introduced to Britain, as when Mr H D Gaunt's explained the use of 'birdie' and 'eagle' that he met in Canada . For many years, eagle was always introduced as American terms, as in 1922 when  Cecil (Cecilia) Leitch described a putt for a 3 on a par-5 hole as 'securing what is known in American golfing parlance as an "eagle"' (Golf XII 1922 p 202). 

  Albatross

Albatross is the term for three under par and is a continuation of the birdie and eagle theme, but is in fact a British term. Ab Smith said his group used the phrase 'double eagle' for three under ( see Birdie above ), which is still the term most Americans and the name for their Double Eagle Club  (membership by invitation only).

Three under par is a very rare score and an albatross is a very rare bird. The exact origin is unclear but the first known reference in 1929 indicates that it had been in use for some time before then.  John G Ridland, who scored an 'albatross' in India in 1934 , theorized that it was the introduction of steel shafted clubs in 1920s which made this score common enough to necessitate a name for it. 

Durban CC Hole 18 L

Durban Country Club 18th Hole site of first recorded albatross, a hole-in-one on 271 yard par-4

The first ‘albatross’ score reported as such in the press is from South Africa when E E Wooler scored a hole-in-one in the summer of 1931 on the 18th hole of the Durban Country Club which is a par-4. It cost £40 in drinks but, had he known that he was making history, he would not have minded. 

More details of the first albatrosses, are given in   The Albatross has Landed  in News section. 

A 'condor' in golf is a score of four (4!) under par. This can be achieved by scoring a hole-in-one on a par-5 hole, or by taking two strokes on a par-6 hole, which are themselves as rare as hen's teeth. Until recently, the idea of a condor was not considered to be possible and certainly few people were aware that anyone had scored one.

Golfing condors have been recorded six times around the world over the last 60 years in the USA, the UK and Australia. Until 2020, they were all par-5 'aces'.   More details can be found here .

The Whaup and Double Bogeys

No standard terms for 2 or 3 or more over Par have emerged. They are just double and triple Bogeys. Depending upon how good you are, anything over 7, 8 or 9 will be a ‘Blow-up’ or a ‘Disaster’.

Joyce Wethered once suggested that a hole-in-one should be called a Curlew, known in Scottish as a 'Whaup', which, though fitting, did not catch on. 

It seems that golfing terms came into popular use in much the same way as you find new words being invented and used on the Internet. If they sound good, people start using them. What we do not hear about are all the terms, such as beantops , that never made it because they did not catch on. Only the future can tell which of the terms that we create will still be in use in a hundred years time.

Updated to add Condor 18th July 2023

▲ Back to Top

Last Updated: Oct 31, 2023

Golf Terms: What is a Bogey in Golf?

A bogey in golf is a golf term to describe a score made on a golf hole where the golfer takes one stroke more than the designated par for the hole.

Written By: Zach Gollwitzer

Featured Image

Term Overview

A brief overview of the term including definition, usage, origins, helpful visuals.

A bogey in golf is a golf term to describe a score made on a golf hole where the golfer takes one stroke more than the designated par for the hole. This is often expressed as "one stroke over par" or more commonly, just "one over".

I made bogey on that hole.

Table of Contents

avatar

New to golf and trying to figure out what all the golf scoring terms mean?

Let's talk about one of the most common golf scoring terms—the "bogey".

Definition of a "bogey" in golf

Article image

Here's how you'd hear this on a golf course:

Dang, I made another bogey
I made bogey on that hole

Here is how many shots it takes to make a bogey on each type of golf hole.

  • Par 5 hole - On a par 5, a bogey is equal to six strokes.
  • Par 4 hole - On a par 4, a bogey is equal to five strokes.
  • Par 3 hole - On a par 3, a bogey is equal to four strokes.

Origin of the term "bogey"

The emergence of the term "bogey" in golf has a fascinating backstory, rooted in military and colloquial language. Its beginnings trace back to World War I when British military pilots employed the term as slang to denote an unidentified or potentially hostile aircraft or target. This colloquialism evolved into a general reference for any unknown entity.

In the golfing realm, "bogey" found its place to signify a score that exceeded par by one stroke on a given hole. The connection lies in the concept of an "unknown" or "unidentified" score over par, reminiscent of its military slang origins. This unconventional score denotation was first recorded in 1890 in England, marking the inception of "bogey" in golfing discourse.

What is "the par" for a golf hole?

In golf, each individual golf hole has a designated "par" based on the hole's distance. This number assumes that a golfer will take two putts on the green, so in general...

  • If the green can be reached on your first shot, it will be a par 3 (1 stroke + 2 putts = 3)
  • If the green can be reached in 2 strokes, it is a par 4 (2 strokes + 2 putts = 4)
  • If the green can be reached in 3 strokes, it is a par 5 (3 strokes + 2 putts = 5).

These distances are different depending on what tee box you are playing from. Players who hit the golf ball shorter will play from the "forward tees" so they can reach the green in the designated number of strokes.

From the championship tees ("back tees") , here are some general distance estimates for each type of hole.

  • Par 3 - Generally, a par 3 is 100-180 yards from the championship tees.
  • Par 4 - Generally, a par 4 is 360-410 yards from the championship tees.
  • Par 5 - Generally, a par 5 is between 450-575 yards from the championship tees.

A golf course will add up all the "pars" for the holes to get the total course par. Generally, this will be either 70, 71, or 72. A golf course with a par of less than 70 are referred to as "Executive Course".

How do you write a bogey on a golf scorecard?

Golf Scorecard Symbols Graphic: What each Mark Means

On a golf scorecard, if you make a bogey, you will put a square around it to easily identify it.

As a side note, a double circle would be an eagle, a square is a bogey, and a double square is a double bogey. A par has no markings around it.

A real example of a bogey in golf

The easiest way to understand a bogey in golf is by example, so here is a video of me making a bogey in real life. As a scratch golfer, bogeys are generally a bad score for me, but for higher handicap golfers, bogeys are more common.

The hole I am playing is a par 4 hole , which means that a bogey is equal to 5 strokes.

In the video, notice how on my second shot, also called my "approach shot", I miss the green . For expert golfers, "missing the green in regulation" is generally when you will see bogeys happen. In this case, I "missed the green" and then failed to "get up and down". This just means that I was unable to make my putt after the chip shot, and therefore, I had a bogey putt and made bogey.

How common is a bogey for average golfers?

For the average golfer, a bogey is a very common score. Depending on your skill level, it can be a great score.

Most golfers shoot between 85-110. In this scoring range, a bogey is a good score.

As you improve your score to the range of 75-85, bogeys are okay , but you will generally not be happy with them.

And as you start shooting between 65-75, you will avoid bogeys at all costs. They are bad for your round.

How common is a bogey for a professional golfer?

Bogeys are very common for professional golfers, but you will rarely see the pros make more than one bogey in a row, and you will rarely see the pros have more than a handful of bogeys in a single round.

On tour, bogeys are bad.

Is a bogey a bad score for all golfers?

While tour players hate bogeys, a bogey is not always a bad score.

Even PGA Tour players can make a "good bogey".

Typically, a "good bogey" on tour would refer to a situation where the golfer has hit their tee shot into water or out of bounds and has to take a penalty stroke. At this point, it becomes near impossible to make a par, so the next best score the pro can shoot for is a bogey.

In these cases, a bogey would be a great score considering the circumstances. Oftentimes, after a pro hits it in the water and still manages to make a bogey, you might hear an announcer say, "well that was good damage control".

This just means, "it could have been a lot worse".

What is "bogey golf"?

A common phrase you might hear is "bogey golf", which refers to a golfer who is skilled, but not an expert.

Typically, a "bogey golfer" will shoot between 85 and 95 and will consider a bogey as a "good" score.

We call it "bogey golf" because rather than measuring yourself against the "par" of the course, you measure yourself against your ability to make bogeys.

In the USGA Handicap system, the "slope rating" is a measurement of how difficult a golf course will be for a "bogey golfer".

What comes after a bogey?

After a bogey is a double bogey, triple bogey, quadruple bogey, quintuple bogey, and... You get the idea.

Unlike scores below par that all have unique names (birdie, eagle, albatross, condor), subsequent scores above par are all types of bogeys.

Related golf terms to "bogey"

Golf Scoring Terms Infographic: Eagle, Birdie, Par, Bogey, and More

Below are other golf scoring terms related to a bogey in golf:

  • Hole-in-one - Also called an "ace", this is when you hit your tee shot in the hole and is most common on par 3s. On a par 3, a hole-in-one is also an "eagle". On a par 4, it is considered an "albatross" or "double eagle".
  • Condor - Also called a "triple eagle", this is the rarest golf score in golf because it requires you to get a hole-in-one on a par 5 hole. This has only happened a handful of times in history, and has never been caught on camera.
  • Albatross - Also called a "double eagle", an albatross is when you shoot 3 shots under the designated "par" for the hole. On a par 3, this is impossible to make. On a par 4, this is equivalent to a hole-in-one. On a par 5, this is when you hit your second shot in the hole.
  • Eagle - An eagle is when you shoot two shots under the designated "par" for the hole. On a par 3, this is equivalent to a hole-in-one. On a par 4, this is when you make a 2. On a par 5, this is when you make a 3.
  • Birdie - A birdie is when you shoot one shot under the designated "par" for the hole. On a par 3, this is equivalent to a 2. On a par 4, this is when you make a 3. On a par 5, this is when you make a 4.
  • Par - A par is when you take an equal number of strokes as designated by the "par" for the hole. On a par 3 this is a 3, par 4 a 4, and as you guessed, a par 5, this is a 5. This is often referred to as "even par", hence why you'll often see the symbol "E" as in the graphic above.
  • Double bogey - A double bogey is when you shoot 2 strokes over par for the hole. For example, on a par 3, this would be a score of 5.
  • Triple bogey (and worse) - A triple bogey (and worse) is when you take 3 strokes over par or more . For example, on a par 4, a score of 7 is a triple bogey, a score of 8 is a quadruple bogey, a score of 9 is a quintuple bogey, and so on.

Curious about other golf terms? Here is my Ultimate List of Golf Terms page that breaks down every golf term, slang, phrase, and lingo.

About the author: Loading...

The ultimate golf terms glossary.

Learn all the golf terms and lingo with my comprehensive golf terms glossary

About the author: Zach Gollwitzer

Zach Gollwitzer profile picture

Hey, I‘m Zach, the founder of The DIY Golfer! I created this site while playing D1 collegiate golf with a simple mission—I wanted to learn the golf swing and get better at golf myself.

Fast forward a few years, and my “journal“, The DIY Golfer, has been viewed by millions of golfers worldwide looking to do the same with their games. my mission is to make golfers more consistent in just a few hours a week through advanced practice strategies and timeless, first-principle golf instruction.

Mentioned in

Golf Puns and Jokes: 52 Par-fect, Tee-rific Laughs  cover image

Our golf puns and jokes are on Par to Drive away the bogeys and Putt a smile on your face. Get ready Fore some tee-rific humor!

Bogey Golf: The Ultimate Strategy on How to Play Bogey Golf

bogey golf tips how to be a bogey golfer

Bogey golf is when you score one more than the posted par score on a golf hole. For some amateur golfers, it’s a real accomplishment!

This article will cover bogey golf and how to be a bogey golfer. Keep scrolling below for specific tips on how to be a better bogey golfer off your drive, approach, and on the green.

Remember, you can’t score par until you know how to bogey!

Key Takeaways

  • Bogey golf involves scoring one stroke over par on each hole, a great accomplishment for amateur golfers.
  • Double, triple, and quadruple bogeys indicate higher scores above par and should be minimized.
  • The term ‘bogey’ originated in Scotland and England in the late 1800s, representing golf’s original ‘par’ score.
  • A bogey golfer’s handicap score is 90, which many golfers find satisfactory.
  • To play bogey golf, focus on hitting straight woods and irons and only putt a maximum of two times per hole.

Table of Contents

What is a bogey in golf.

A bogey in golf is shooting one stroke over what the par on that individual hole is.

  • On a par 3, a bogey is a score of 4.
  • On a par 4, a bogey is a score of 5.
  • On a par 5, a bogey is a score of 6.

Is Bogey Golf Good?

A bogey is not a bad score in the game of golf. For lots of casual golfers, bogey golf is a great goal!

Golf is a challenging sport to learn. If you are starting out, shooting one stroke over a particular hole’s par rating is a great accomplishment. Most golfers are content to be bogey golfers!

bogey golf scorecard

What is a Double Bogey in Golf?

On top of just a regular bogey, a double bogey means shooting two strokes over that hole’s par rating.

  • On a par 3, a double bogey is a score of 5
  • On a par 4, a double bogey is a score of 6
  • On a par 5, a double bogey is a score of 7

For most regular golfers, a double bogey is easily achievable. You can hit one or two bad shots and still save a double bogey score.

Is Double Bogey Golf Good?

Double bogey golf, where a player averages a score of two over par on each hole, isn’t considered as proficient as bogey golf. However, it is still a reasonable standard of play for many weekend golfers and beginners.

Double bogey golf represents a stage in a golfer’s development where they are still learning the game’s nuances and improving their skills. While there’s room to grow from a double bogey standard, achieving this level of play can still offer a satisfying and enjoyable golfing experience.

Remember, the most important part of golf is to enjoy playing the game, and as long as you are doing that, you’re doing great.

What is a Triple Bogey in Golf? Quadruple Bogey?

Triple bogey and quadruple bogey are other scores in golf and mean exactly as they sound.

  • A triple bogey means shooting three strokes over par.
  • A quadruple bogey means shooting four strokes over par.

These scores are worse than just a regular or double bogey and will quickly increase your score on the scorecard.

Below, we will review a few things you can do as a golfer to limit double bogeys and these other higher scores.

Birdie, Eagle, and Albatross

If you are lucky enough to score under par on a hole, you’ll need to understand what a birdie, eagle, and an albatross is.

  • A birdie means shooting one stroke under a hole’s par rating.
  • An eagle means shooting two strokes under par.
  • An albatross means shooting three strokes under par (usually a 2 on a par 5)!

These scores are really good because they help to offset bogeys that you get on other holes.

What does the word bogey mean?

“bogey” originated in Scotland and England in the late 1800s. It was slang related to the quest for finding the “bogey man” being as hard as getting a perfect score on a golf hole.

When scoring criteria were first introduced on British golf courses, bogey represented the result that the best players were expected to achieve on each hole.

As the game evolved, so did the scoring measures and terms used to describe them. Eventually, all golf courses moved this route, with the bogey showing one stroke above the expected result on each hole.

Is scoring a bogey in golf bad?

It depends on your skill level out on the golf course.

For professional golfers, known as a scratch golfer , getting a bogey is typically considered a bad score. Professional golfers aim to shoot under par, meaning a bogey adds more strokes to their score than they would like.

Only a small percentage of golfers are scratch golfers, so this only applies to a few.

For amateur golfers, a bogey can be viewed as an average to a good score, depending on the hole and how challenging the golf course is.

A bogey can be considered a great score for recreational golfers.

Golf is a challenging sport to pick up and learn. If you can hit the ball consistently to get within one stroke over par, you can consider that a success.

Golf Accessories Every Bogey Golfer Should Have

To play better golf, there are a few key accessories that we think all bogey golfers should invest in:

  • Golf Shoes : Proper shoes (spiked or spikeless) give you extra traction on the golf course, which helps you hit more solid golf shots.
  • Golf Glove : Like your shoes, proper gloves prevent your hands from slipping on your golf club’s grip. This will help you hit more solid shots.
  • Golf GPS or Watch : To be better at golf, you must know how far you can hit each club. A golf GPS watch or rangefinder will help you dial in your distances and help you pick the right club for each situation.

Shop some of the top golf accessories for bogey golfers below. Click here to view tons of other gifts for golfers .

FootJoy Men's FJ Fuel Golf Shoe, White/Black/Orange, 11

A Bogey Golfer’s Average Golf Score

If you finish with a bogey score at the end of 18 holes, your average score will be 90.

Ask yourself:

Would you be happy if you had a score of 90 on a golf round?

How To Play Bogey Golf

If you are looking to score lower , you first need to master how play bogey golf off the tee, on your approach, pitching, chipping, and putting.

If you aim to play bogey golf, your tee shot becomes critical. Before your shot, you will want to check out the fairway and decide which side of the fairway would be best to land on for a better approach shot into the green.

If the hole is a dogleg left or right, it will make sense to try and get the best view at the green without any obstacles or trees in the way.

This plays the same for a par 3. Look at where the hole is located on the green, then decide which side of the green you want to aim at. This will give you the best look at your second shot.

As a bogey golfer, it is important that your tee shot lands in the fairway or light rough so that you can hit a pure approach shot.

To improve your tee shot, watch this video below! It helped me save strokes off of the tee box.

TOP 5 DRIVER GOLF TIPS - IMPORTANT DO'S & DON'TS!

Approach Shot

Once you have your ball on the fairway (or not), you have to aim your approach shot and decide where to attempt to land the ball on the green. Take a look at where the flag is located.

At most golf courses, there is some indicator on the flagstick to tell you if it is situated in the green’s front, middle, or back.

Another helpful tip I’ve found is to club up on your irons. In most cases, clubbing up will help remove the slope and wind that may be a factor in the course. It also should ensure that you have enough club to get up to the green and past the hole, leaving you an easy chip back near the pin.

You want your approach shot straight towards the hole so that even if you are short or deep, you have a clear next shot.

Pitching and Chipping

When up near the green, you must be careful with pitching and chipping to limit yourself to a bogey.

One helpful tip is that if you can putt the ball from off the green, you should.

If you need to chip, always watch the ball. Place the ball back in your stance and let the wedge’s loft get underneath to pop the ball up and toward your target.

You don’t want to be super aggressive because that will have you sending the ball way past the hole. You will often want to use your pitching or approach wedge , which has the perfect loft for these types of shots.

The goal is to get the ball to stop as close to the hole as possible.

To be a bogey golfer, it is important that you never putt more than two times on the green on a single hole. This will limit the number of strokes you add to your scorecard when you play golf .

To limit your putts, you need to master your putting weight. You don’t want to be super aggressive because that will have you putting way past the hole. Try to read the slope rating of the green as best as possible.

If you are on the green in regulation, you will also have a great look to score par with a two-putt.

how to play bogey golf putting

What is a Bogey Golf Handicap?

A bogey golf handicap refers to a handicap of 18 for a standard 18-hole course. This is calculated based on the idea that the golfer will make a bogey, or one over par, on each hole.

According to the United States Golf Association , a bogey golfer is considered a golfer with a course handicap of 20 on a course of standard difficulty. You usually shoot about 20 strokes over the golf course’s par.

If you were to bogey every hole on the golf course, you would be 18 over par. This does equate to an 18 handicap, but several other factors are also taken into consideration.

It is a clear sign of a golfer who has moved beyond beginner status and can maintain a consistent playstyle over the course of a round.

Most amateurs would be happy averaging a bogey per hole, but would you?

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What is a bogey on golf.

In golf, a bogey is a score of one stroke over par on a particular hole.

What is a birdie, bogey, and eagle in golf?

In golf, a birdie is a score of one stroke under par on a hole, a bogey is a score of one stroke over par on a hole, and an eagle is a score of two strokes under par on a hole.

Is a bogey better than a birdie?

No, a birdie is better than a bogey in golf as it is a score of one stroke under par while a bogey is a score of one stroke over par

Is bogey worse than par?

Yes, bogey is worse than par in golf as it means taking one more stroke than the set par for a particular hole.

What’s worse than a bogey in golf?

In golf, a double bogey is worse than a bogey, which means taking two more strokes than the set par for a particular hole.

What is 18 holes of golf called?

In golf, playing a full round of golf consisting of 18 holes is called a “round of golf.”

What are bad golfers called?

There is no specific term for bad golfers, but sometimes the term “hackers” or “duffers” is used.

What does E stand for in golf score?

In golf, “E” stands for “even,” which means the golfer has completed a hole or a round with a score that is equal to par.

What is the purpose of a golf handicap?

The purpose of a golf handicap is to allow golfers of different skill levels to compete fairly against each other. The handicap system adjusts a golfer’s score based on their skill level, so that they can compete on an even playing field with other golfers.

Ryan William

Ryan William

With over 25 years hands-on experience in the golfing world, Ryan is not just an avid golfer but a topical authority. His journey has had him delve deep into the nuances of the sport, from mastering the swing to understanding new golf technology. As an entrepreneur, Ryan is at the forefront of the latest golf trends, reviewing all new clubs, accessories, and training aids. His insights and expertise are backed by a prolific writing career, with over 1000 articles published across various platforms. Ryan's commitment is clear: to guide and inform the golf community with unparalleled knowledge and passion.

Last update on 2024-03-05 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Leave a Comment Cancel reply

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

Modern Golf Apparel

bogey a hole

Save on TaylorMade, Callaway & more!

What is a Bogey in Golf? Golfing Terms Explained for Everyone

The origin of many of golf terms stems from the early 1900s and provides for interesting reading with some amusing stories.

If you ask golfers what a bogey means, many will respond with the 1-over par explanation, but few will be able to explain the origins and how it relates to par.

Bogey, like so many other golfing terms, has 2 connotations dependent on the period in history and context that you refer to. To put the term in perspective, I will delve into the history which will hopefully clear up any misunderstanding.

What Exactly Is A Bogey?

In conclusion, related articles.

The concept of bogey was invented in 1890 by Mr. Hugh Rotherham, then secretary of the Coventry Golf Club. The idea behind this was to set a standard score for good golfers on every hole. This was called the “ground score”.

Although the term “par” was also used at the time it referred to the ’perfect’ score on a hole. Par was a popular measurement in the US whereas bogey was trending in the UK.

Every golf club was left with the responsibility to assess and define bogey or ground score and the implementation varied between golf clubs.

As golfers improved in ability and equipment scores reduced and the better golfers would sometimes aim for par rather than bogey.

Par and bogey scores of each hole were often the same but sometimes the bogey score for the most difficult holes would be one over par hence the use of bogey in the modern context.

Some more traditional golf clubs still show the bogey score and a par score on their scorecard and there are still bogey competitions held regularly. Generally, the bogey score for a round will be approximately 5-6 shots higher than par.

When developing the frequently used Stableford scoring system, Dr. Frank Stableford points were awarded against bogey, not par. 2 points were awarded on a hole if you matched the bogey score under Dr. Stableford’s original system

The use of the term “par” dates back to the early 1900s. The length of the hole determined the par of each hole.

The USGA originally determined that each par designation would allow for 2 putts and the remainder of par is dependent on the number of shots required to get to the green. Par was calculated as

  • Holes up to 225 yards would be a par 3
  • Holes between 225 and 425 yards would be a par 4
  • Holes of 426 to 600 yards would be a par 5
  • Holes longer than 600 yards would be a par 6

What we have established by now is that the term bogey refers to 1 shot over par.

Where Does The Term “Bogey” Come From?

Some versions of the origin of the term “bogey “, indicate that it originated from Scotland although there are different versions of this.

  • One version credits Major Charles Wellman remarked that a player was “a regular Bogey man”
  • Another version ascribes the term to Scottish slang for goblins or devils.
  • Other versions suggest that the term is derived from an English dance hall song titled “The Bogey Man” which included the lyrics, “I’m the Bogey Man, catch me if you can.”
  • Yet another version suggests that includes the same song is that a certain Dr. Browne, Secretary of the Great Yarmouth Club, embraced the term and the club’s golfers agreed to the use of the term. It is said that during a competition Mr. CA Wellman bellowed to Dr. Browne that “This player of yours is a regular Bogey man”.

Now that we have attempted to determine where the bogey originated and who was possibly responsible for the common use of the term, let us look at the variations of the term for increments of over-par scores.

To record a bogey, you have to score 1 shot more than the regular par score set by the golf club for the specific hole.

  • On a par 3, a score of 4 will be called a bogey
  • On a par 4, a score of 5 will be called a bogey
  • On a par 5, a score of 6 will be called a bogey
  • On a par 6, a score of 7 will be called a bogey

Unlike scores below par having different avian terms, the bogey remains the only term used for scores over par.  Some golfers have tried to get the term “buzzard” accepted for a double bogey, but this has not become common use.

Scoring 2 over par is called a “double bogey”, 3 over par a triple bogey, 4 over par a quadruple bogey, 5 over par a quintuple bogey, and higher scores, which you are unlikely to score, follows the trend.

Professional golfers are often frustrated when scoring a bogey but the average golfer with a handicap between 16 and 20 is expected to score a bogey on every hole.

The USPGA sets the average golf handicap at 15. These golfers are often called “bogey golfers”. Since most golfers can score par on some holes it is common to see some double or triple bogeys on the card at the end of the round.

I hope that this article shed some light on where the bogey originated and how it became a 1 over par score as it is used to today.

To do a more in-depth investigation into the history and terms used in golf with all the quirks associated with it, you can find more information in Robert Browning’s History of Golf 1955 .

Enjoy your next round and leave the doubles and triples for later when you drown our sorrows or celebrate your excellent round on the 19 th hole.

  • Golf Terms Explained: A Complete A to Z of Common Golfing Terms and Sayings
  • What Is A Scratch Golfer?
  • What Is A Birdie In Golf?
  • What does Forecaddie mean?

' src=

Nick is the founder of GolfSpan and an avid golfer. He's not quite a pro but has over 15 years of experience playing and coaching golfers worldwide. His mission is to bring the golfing community a better experience when it comes to choosing the right golf gear and finding the right setup for your game.

  • Nick Lomas https://www.golfspan.com/author/nicklomas Callaway Supersoft Golf Balls Review: Pros, Cons, & Costs
  • Nick Lomas https://www.golfspan.com/author/nicklomas 14 Golf Exercises For Seniors To Make You More Mobile
  • Nick Lomas https://www.golfspan.com/author/nicklomas What Is A Good Golf Handicap: Data Reveals Where You Stand
  • Nick Lomas https://www.golfspan.com/author/nicklomas 7 Best Low Compression Golf Balls: Pros & Cons of Using Them

You might also like these

up-and-down-golf

CONNECT WITH US

gs-logo-white

Honest Golfers bandit logo favicon 512

What Is A Bogey In Golf (And Double Bogey)

When you purchase through links on our site, we may earn a teeny-tiny 🤏 affiliate commission.

Kolter Knutson

“You made a bogey there,” you might hear your golf buddies say. Of course, you laugh along and continue playing. But in the back of your mind, you have a question you don’t want to ask them. What in the world is a bogey in golf terminology ?

A bogey in golf is a term for going over par by one shot. Different holes have different par ratings, and if you take more shots than expected to complete that hole, you might have multiple bogeys on your scorecard.

In this article, you will learn all you need to know about par ratings and how to minimize bogeys by staying close to the net par. You will also discover how common golf bogies are for golfers with different experience levels.

By the end of this post, you’ll understand how the golf bogey can affect your game.

What Is A Golf Bogey?

What Is A Bogey

A bogey is a score that is over the standard par of a hole by one shot. If a player is one over par for any hole, he’s made a bogey . Different holes have different part ratings, and staying within those prevents bogeys.

The more bogeys a golfer makes, the higher his score. So every bogey brings one closer to losing unless one’s competitors make as many bogeys.

Even a single bogey can give pause to a pro golfer. But it isn’t unheard of for hobbyists to make multiple bogeys throughout the course.

What Is A Double Bogey?

What Is A Double Bogey

A double bogey results from going two pars over the standard par of a hole. If you take two more shots than are standard for a hole, you’ve made a double bogey. But if you go one over par in two different holes, you’ve made two bogeys.

To make a double bogey, you have to go over par by two shots in the same hole. You can offset the effects of a double bogey by going one under par in the next two holes or two under par in a single hole.

Understanding bogey management is much easier once you learn more about going over par.

Going Over Par: A Brief Explanation

Going Over Par A Brief Explanation

There are eighteen holes in a standard golf course, and each hole has a specific par rating. This rating indicates the number of shots an average player takes to get the ball in that hole.

When you take fewer shots than the average to get the same hole, your performance is considered higher than average. The opposite is also true, which is why going over par is such a big deal.

So What Is A Par?

So What Is A Par

Par, in general, means “average,” “norm,” and even “median” in some contexts. A par in golf simply refers to the number of shots a golfer is expected to take to complete the hole. A masterful golfer might hole out with half as many shots as the par rating.

On the other hand, a beginner might make 18 bogeys in the course of a single game. “Par,” by definition, refers to the average, and it is hard to expect people with different experience levels to perform on par with each other.

Is Going Over Par Good Or Bad?

Is Going Over Par Good Or Bad

A high score is good in sports like basketball, soccer, and football. But in Golf, the point of achievement (holes) is fixed, and all players must complete all the holes.

Therefore, the competitive decision is made based on the number of shots one takes to complete a hole. The goal of a golfer is to hole out as much as he can with as few shots as possible.

Since the par rating refers to the average number of shots it takes to complete a hole, going over displays poor performance. If a hole is par-4, the average player makes four shots to finish it.

There’s a chance that someone aces that hole with a single shot. That would indicate that he is under par by 3 shots, which is great. But if the same player needs to make 7 shots to complete a hole that an average player completes in 4 shots, he’s over par by 3 shots, which is bad.

When getting into golf from a standard sports background, it is easy to confuse score for achievement.

But the score in golf doesn’t track achievement. It tracks attempts. The par rating is, therefore, the average attempts required, and needing more attempts is a sign of poor performance.

What Are The Consequences Of Going Over Par?

What Are The Consequences Of Going Over Par

Once you start seeing “par” in golf as “average attempts,” you can easily see that going under par indicates good performance. But is par symbolic? Or are there consequences to going over it?

The par rating isn’t designed as an external judgment tool. It is designed as a self-assessment metric. When you go over par for a particular hole, you have a poorer-than-average performance for it. Going over par has no obligatory consequences, though.

You might make a bogey, but your opponent might make a triple bogey. In such a situation, you going over par means nothing because you’re still not as over par as your opponent.

It is tough to keep track of the score throughout 18 holes. So, trying to keep yourself under par is a good measure. If you go over par in one hole, you can go under par by the same degree in the next hole to even out your performance.

Going over par has consequences only when your opponent has been on par or under the par rating for most holes throughout the game.

Why Is There A Par Rating In Golf?

Why Is There A Par Rating In Golf

A par rating in golf is set to establish an average for expert golfers to achieve. It is a self-assessment tool that helps pro golfers keep track of their performance.

For new golfers and semi-serious amateurs, the par rating is aspirational. But for professional golfers, it is a baseline for the expected average, and falling below it means their performance is below average for their tier of performance.

How Much Can You Go Over Par In Golf?

How Much Can You Go Over Par In Golf

You can go over par by up to 3 shots across 18 holes and recover even if you’re playing the tour. When playing golf with your friends, you can go over par by as many shots as you like as long as your overall score remains lower than theirs.

That said, you can expect the following golf performance in relation to par ratings for different contexts:

  • Fresh Golfer – 24 to 48 net over par – When you start golf, you can take 100 to 120 shots to complete an 18-hole course. That’s a total of 24 to 48 shots over the expert par rating. 
  • A golfer with one month of experience -18 to 38 over par – With one month of practice, you can shave off 6 to 10 shots from your course completion, coming slightly close to the total par rating of all the holes in the course. 
  • A golfer with 6 months of experience – 10 to 28 over par – With 6 months of experience, you can expect to start completing some holes under par. If your overall performance is 10 over par, you’ve completed at least 8 holes on par. 
  • A golfer with 1 year of experience – 5 to 23 over par – After golfing for one year, you can start performing under par in more holes. However, you could still make multiple bogeys throughout the game, depending on how often you play. 
  • A golfer with 3 years of experience – 3 to 18 over par – With three years of experience, you can start performing net under par. But not all golfers train the same. Some golfers might take three years to reach the level where they make one bogey per hole throughout the game.

How To Reduce Bogeys In Golf?

How To Reduce Bogeys In Golf

Reducing bogeys can help you reduce your overall score in golf. But you cannot expect to eliminate bogeys, especially if you don’t have a decade of golfing experience. A realistic way to minimize bogeys in golf is to get more course time.

Here are a few things you can do to bring your performance closer to the net par of expert golfers.

  • Play more strategically – Don’t try to ace every hole. Trying to get the perfect round will only increase the bogeys you make. Start thinking strategically and playing with the shots you have available in a par. For a par-4 hole, try to use all four shots in a way that each shot feeds the next. 
  • Practice more often – Nothing can replace practice in improving your game. So you have to practice more often to reduce bogeys. 
  • Get fitted for equipment – Golf is one of the few sports where you can get equipment customized to your height, physique, and natural swing. Getting equipment that maximizes your performance can minimize bogeys. 
  • Focus on your short game – Even if you don’t have time to play entire rounds, you can practice putting, pitching, and chipping. This can help you improve in areas where most bogeys are made. 
  • Don’t think about bogeys – Finally, as counterproductive as it might seem, not thinking about them is perhaps the best way to minimize them. When you start putting more emphasis on the par rating, you raise the mental stakes and get nervous.

The Golf Bogey: Final Thoughts

Final Thoughts

A bogey in golf refers to going over par by one shot. Unless you’re an expert golfer, you can expect to make at least 18 bogeys. The par rating for a hole is the average number of shots an expert golfer takes to complete a hole.

And unless you’re an expert, it is just an aspirational minimum you should try to achieve with regular practice and strategic gameplay.

Kolter Knutson

Meet Kolter, the dedicated golfer driving Honest Golfers forward. His golfing journey started at the young age of 8, guiding him through youth tours, high school, and college golf. With a remarkable stint as a two-time Team Captain at Carroll College, Helena, MT, and participation as a two-time World Long Drive regional qualifier, Kolter's expertise runs deep. Now, he shares his lifelong passion and knowledge, offering sincere advice and gear recommendations to fellow enthusiasts. Embark on a golfing adventure with him, and together, let's enhance our skills on the fairways.

Facebook Logo

What is a "Bogey" in Golf? Scoring Terms Explained.

Last Updated on June 16, 2023

What is a "Bogey" in Golf? Scoring Terms Explained.

What is a Bogey in Golf?

“Bogey” is a  golf scoring term  meaning a golfer made a score of one stroke over  par  on a particular hole.

Examples of Bogeys include:

  • 4 strokes on a par-3 hole
  • 5 strokes on a par-4 hole
  • 6 strokes on a par-5 hole

Is Scoring a Bogey Bad?

Is a Bogey Bad?

It depends on how skilled of a golfer you are.

Low handicap,  scratch , and professional golfers won’t be happy whenever they get a bogey. They’re always striving to score par or better on each hole.

However, considering you’re reading an article titled “What is a Bogey in Golf?”, you’re likely at a skill level where you should take pride when you can manage only to score one stroke over par.

If you got a bogey on every hole of your round, you would have a score of 90 on a par-72 golf course. For the average golfer who is newer to the game, reaching/breaking a score of 90 is a significant accomplishment.

“Double Bogey,” “Triple Bogey,” “Quadruple Bogey”

The names for scores worse than a bogey aren’t very creative.

  • A “Double Bogey” is a score of 2 strokes over par on any individual hole.
  • A “Triple Bogey” is a score of 3 strokes over par on any individual hole.
  • A “Quadruple Bogey” is a score of 4 strokes over par on any individual hole.

For example, 5 strokes on a par-3 would be a double bogey, and 9 strokes on a par-5 would be a quadruple bogey.

Every Golfer Makes Bogeys and Worse, Even the Pros

Even the best golfers in the world score bogeys or worse. In 2019, PGA golfers averaged 2.62 bogeys in the  TOUR Championship .

That year, Rory McIlroy had the fewest bogeys per round. Despite this, a player of his caliber can still massively struggle on a bad day.

In the  opening round of the Open Championship , Rory McIlroy started the first hole with a quadruple bogey, 4-putted the par-3 16th hole for a double bogey, and finished his round with a triple bogey on the 18th hole.

You can see Rory's entire round in the video below:

Bogeys For Average Players

MyGolfSpy  and  TheGrint  (a golf GPS and handicapping app) teamed up to analyze the average number of birdies or better, pars, and bogeys or worse scored per round by golfers of various skill levels.

They found that golfers with a 16-20 handicap (that’s often said to be the  average handicap  of all golfers) averaged 7.3 bogeys, 4.7 double bogeys, and 2.1 triple bogeys or worse per 18-hole round. Golfers of this skill level only managed 3.6 pars and 0.3  birdies  or better on average.

If you look one group down the list, golfers in the 21-25 handicap range, these golfers averaged 8.9 double bogeys or worse per 18 holes. In other words, they scored worse than a bogey on almost half their holes.

Final Thoughts

If this article is the first time you learned what a bogey is, you’re probably new to golf. While your more experienced golfing buddies or the pros you watch on TV may be disappointed when they score bogeys, “bogey golf” is a level to aspire to for new golfers. Feel free to get excited the next time you score a bogey on a hole. The first round that you average scoring just one over par is also a huge milestone.

  • Golf Terms Guide
  • Golf Scoring Terms
  • Best Golf Rangefinder
  • What to Wear Golfing
  • Terms of Service
  • Privacy Policy
  • Affiliate Disclosure

Twitter Icon Link

Golf Scoring Term: Par, Bogey, Birdie, Eagle and More

Golf Scoring Term

Are you a beginner golfer trying to wrap your head around all of the lingo? Scoring terminology can be one of the most confusing topics for golfers. From birdies to bogies, there are lots of terms that every golfer needs to know. In this blog post, we’ll cover some essential scoring vocabulary and what it means on the course. So get ready to hit the links feeling more confident in your understanding of golf scoring terminology!

Read more: Golf Foursomes Guide : How Does It Work?

Table of Contents

What Are The Common Terms Used In Golf Scoring?

Score: This is the total number of shots a golfer has taken to get their ball into the hole (a round of golf consists of 18 holes). A score can be expressed in either gross or net.

Gross Score: The total number of strokes taken by a golfer on each hole, with no allowances for handicaps. For example, if a golfer scored 5 on the first hole, 4 on the second and so on, their gross score would be 73.

Net Score: A net score is calculated by subtracting any handicap allowance from the golfer’s gross score. For example, if a player with a 16 handicap shot a gross score of 74, their net score would be 58.

Par : This is the number of shots an average golfer should take to get their ball into the hole. The par for each hole can vary, but a standard round of golf usually has a par of 72 (which means 18 holes with a par 4).

Bogey : A bogey is a single stroke above par. So if a golfer takes 5 shots to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored a bogey.

Double Bogey: A double bogey is two strokes above par. So if a golfer takes 6 shots to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored a double bogey.

Triple Bogey: A triple bogey is three strokes above par. So if a golfer takes 7 shots to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored a triple bogey.

Quadruple Bogey: A quadruple bogey is four strokes above par. So if a golfer takes 8 shots to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored a quadruple bogey.

Birdie : A birdie is a single stroke under par, so if a golfer takes 3 shots to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored a birdie.

Eagle : An eagle is two strokes under par. So if a golfer takes 2 shots to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored an eagle.

Albatross /Double Eagle: An albatross is three strokes under par. So if a golfer takes 1 shot to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored an albatross.

Condor: A condor is four strokes under par. So if a golfer takes 0 shots to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored a condor.

Ace/Hole in One : An ace is a shot made from the tee into the hole with one stroke. A golfer with an ace on a par 4 has scored a hole-in-one.

Scorecard: A scorecard is used to record each player’s score for each hole. It also includes information such as the course, par for each hole, number of holes played, and other important information. The scorecard is used to track a golfer’s progress over time.

Stableford Points: Stableford points are awarded based on a golfer’s performance in relation to par on each hole. For each stroke taken under or above par, a golfer earns points. These points are tallied up at the end of the round and used to rank players in competitions and tournaments.

Handicap: A handicap is an indication of a golfer’s playing level, relative to other golfers. It is calculated using the scores from previous rounds and is used to give every player an equal chance in tournaments and competitions. A lower handicap indicates a better player, while a higher handicap indicates a less experienced golfer.

What Are The Difference Between Even-Par, Under-Par, and Over-Par Scores?

Golf Scoring Terms

Golf Scoring Term

A player can earn different types of scores based on their performance on the course. These scores include even-par, under-par, and over-par, and they provide insight into how well a player performed compared to the expected level of play.

When a golfer scores even-par, it means they have completed the course in the expected number of strokes. For example, if a golfer completes a par-72 course with a score of 72, they have achieved an even-par score. This is considered a solid performance, as the golfer has met the expected level of play.

An under-par score is achieved when a golfer completes the course in fewer strokes than expected. For example, if a golfer completes a par-72 course with a score of 69, they have achieved an under-par score of 3. This is a highly desirable score, as it indicates the golfer has performed better than expected.

An over-par score is earned when a golfer completes the course in more strokes than expected. For example, if a golfer completes a par-72 course with a score of 76, they have earned an over-par score of 4. This is a less desirable score, as it indicates the golfer has performed worse than expected.

It’s important to note that the par for a course can vary depending on the course’s difficulty level, so a score of even-par, under-par, or over-par may have different meanings from course to course. Additionally, different golf tournaments may have different expectations for player scores based on factors such as weather conditions or course setup.

How To Calculate Your Golf Score Using A Simple Formula?

Calculating your golf score may seem intimidating at first, but it’s actually quite simple. Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to calculate your golf score using a simple formula:

Determine the par for the course: The first step in calculating your golf score is to determine the par for the course you’re playing. Par is the number of strokes a skilled golfer should take to complete a hole or a course.

  • Keep track of your strokes: Throughout the game, keep track of the number of strokes you take on each hole. Write it down on a scorecard or use a golf GPS app to track your shots.
  • Subtract the par from your total strokes: Once you’ve completed the round, subtract the total number of strokes you took from the par of the course. This will give you your score for the round.
  • For example, let’s say you played a round on a par-72 course and you took 90 strokes. To calculate your score, simply subtract 72 from 90: 90 – 72 = 18. Your score for the round is 18 over par.

Strokes – Handicap adjustment = Scores

You can even use this formula to compare different rounds and find out which course you perform better on. Just remember to always subtract any handicaps before you divide, and your golf score will be accurate every time.

You can learn about how to calculate golf Handicaps in the article: What Are Golf Handicaps? Meaning & How To Calculate

Final Thoughts

Understanding golf scoring terms is an important part of gameplay. Increasing your knowledge of these terms enhances your overall performance on the course and can help you become a better golfer. Whether you are a beginner or an experienced player, it is essential to know the proper terminology for strokes, pars, birdies and bogeys.

Taking the time to brush up on golf scoring terms will benefit not just your game but also the way that other players perceive your play. As shown in this blog post, having a deep understanding of golf rules and their associated terminology can help you make smarter decisions during gameplay which could ultimately propel you to have more consistent lower scores.

Alvin Daniel

Hello everyone, I'm Alvin Daniel. I was born in the Philippines and came to the United States when I was 16 years old. I started playing golf at that age and have loved it ever since. I turned professional when I was 21 and have been working as a golf instructor and guide ever since. My goal is to help everyone know more about this great game of golf. And, hopefully, through my instruction, they can improve their skills and enjoy the game even more.

View all posts

What Is a Good Score in Golf? How Much In 18 Holes & 9 Holes

Four ball golf: rules, strategies & how it works in match and stroke play, related posts, what is a hole out in golf, why is golf so popular the reasons why, how to golf swing like pro golfers: guidelines..., what is a mulligan in golf & where..., 10+ golf betting sites & apps update 2023, what is a links golf course definition &..., what is a bogey in golf definition &..., what is an albatross in golf definition &..., what are golf handicaps meaning & golf handicap..., what is an eagle in golf meaning &..., leave a comment cancel reply.

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

The Golf Holes

Golf Scoring Terms (Par, Bogey, Eagle, Birdie, Albatross, and More)

Golf Scoring Terms

Golf, a sport that melds skill, strategy, and a touch of finesse, comes with its own rich vocabulary of Golf scoring terms . From the familiar Stroke to the elusive Condor , each term encapsulates a moment on the course, a stroke of the club that defines a golfer’s journey. Let’s unravel the language of golf scoring and explore the nuances of Stroke, Par, Birdie, Eagle, Albatross , and more.

Normal Loft of a Pitching Wedge in Golf.

Table of contents: golf scoring terms., stroke: the fundamental unit, par: the benchmark of performance, even: a perfect balance, bogey: a minor setback, double bogey, triple bogey, quadruple bogey: escalating challenges, birdie: soaring above par, eagle: majestic mastery, albatross / double eagle: rare and remarkable, condor: the mythical marvel, hole-in-one / ace: a stroke of perfection, conclusion: a tapestry of golfing moments, faqs: golf scoring terms..

bogey a hole

Understanding the Basics: Stroke and Par

At the heart of golf scoring is the concept of a Stroke . This term refers to each time a golfer takes a swing at the ball. Every stroke counts, and the cumulative total shapes the scorecard at the end of a round.

Par sets the standard for each hole on the course. It represents the number of strokes a skilled golfer is expected to take to complete the hole. Scoring Under Par means completing the hole in fewer strokes, while going Over Par signifies a score higher than the expected number.

When a golfer matches the expected number of strokes for a hole, they achieve Even . It’s a moment of equilibrium, where the player’s performance aligns precisely with the course’s design.

Golf Swing Pull With Left Arm or Push With Right.

bogey a hole

Navigating Challenges: Bogey and Beyond

A Bogey occurs when a golfer completes a hole in one stroke over par. It’s a minor setback, a stumble on the path to perfection. While not a disastrous outcome, it signifies room for improvement.

As the number of strokes surpasses par, golfers encounter the escalating challenges of Double Bogey , Triple Bogey , and Quadruple Bogey . Each increment represents a greater struggle on the course, urging players to regroup and refocus.

The Golf swing left arm dominant: Unraveling the Technique

Pinnacle achievements: birdie, eagle, albatross, condor, hole-in-one.

A Birdie is cause for celebration, earned by completing a hole in one stroke less than par. It reflects skillful play, strategic thinking, and the ability to outperform the course’s expectations.

Achieving an Eagle involves completing a hole two strokes under par. It’s a majestic feat, showcasing a golfer’s mastery over the course and their capability to navigate challenges with finesse.

The Albatross , or Double Eagle , is a rare and remarkable accomplishment in golf. It occurs when a golfer finishes a hole three strokes under par, a testament to extraordinary skill and precision.

A Condor is the stuff of golfing legends. This term is reserved for completing a hole four strokes under par, an exceedingly rare occurrence that few golfers can claim. It’s a mythical marvel, etching the player’s name in golfing history.

The pinnacle of golfing achievement is the Hole-in-One , also known as an Ace . It occurs when a golfer successfully sinks the ball in the cup with just one stroke from the tee. It’s a stroke of perfection, a moment that resonates in the memory of every golfer fortunate enough to experience it.

The Right Foot Back Golf Swing: A Game-Changer.

In the world of golf, each swing tells a story. The scoring terms woven into the fabric of the game add depth and meaning to a golfer’s journey. From the routine strokes to the rare and extraordinary, these terms capture the essence of the sport—a pursuit of excellence, a battle with the course, and the thrill of achieving the seemingly impossible.

As you navigate the golf course, let these scoring terms be your guide, shaping your narrative and adding color to each round. Embrace the challenges, celebrate the victories, and revel in the rich tapestry of golfing moments.

Golf scoring terms denote the number of strokes a player takes on a hole relative to the standard.

Achieving an Albatross, or a score of three strokes under par on a hole, is extremely rare and signifies exceptional skill.

Yes, overall score matters more than individual hole scores. Consistency across the round is crucial for competitive golf.

Scoring an Eagle involves completing a hole two strokes under par, while a Birdie is one stroke under par.

Understanding scoring terms helps players assess their performance, set goals, and refine strategies for a more successful and enjoyable golf experience.

Related Posts

DRIVING IRON VS HYBRID

DRIVING IRON VS HYBRID: PROS AND CONS.

Driving golf irons, The surge in demand for utility irons,…

Mastering Downswing in Golf.

Mastering the Downswing in Golf: A Path to Precision and Power.

Downswing in Golf, Golf, with its blend of elegance and…

Gapping Golf

Mastering Gapping Golf: A Comprehensive Guide to Precision in Your Golf Game.

Introduction Mastering Gapping Golf: In the intricate world of golf,…

Leave a Comment Cancel reply

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

  • Athlete Index

Sahith Theegala reacts after missing a putt.

Why Is a Bogey Called a Bogey in Golf?

The terms we use to describe golf scores have become commonplace across the world. Par is the expected score on any given hole, birdie is used for a score of 1 under par, bogey is used for a score of 1 over par, and so on. Everyone who’s ever picked up a golf club knows this.

But for hundreds of years after the sport was invented in the 15th century, there were no terms used for specific scores. That finally changed in the 1890s when the term “bogey” was invented. So, why is a bogey called a bogey in golf, and where does the term come from?

Where does the golf term “bogey” come from?

Sahith Theegala reacts after missing a putt.

Before the 19th century, golfers didn’t have terms to describe specific scores. In competitions, whichever golfer finished with the fewest strokes was simply declared the winner.

But in the 1890s, a scoring system began to emerge, starting with the term “bogey.” The word originated from a popular British Isles song called, “The Bogey Man,” which detailed an “elusive figure who hid in the shadows,” according to the USGA official website. “I’m the Bogey Man, catch me if you can,” the lyrics go.

Golfers started comparing the hunt for the Bogey Man to the hunt for the perfect score in golf. At first, the term “bogey” was used to describe the ideal score on a hole or a full round. By the early 1910s, “par” took over as the term used for the expected score on a hole, and “bogey” was eventually repurposed to mean a score of 1 over par.

The next time you’re on the golf course, I wish you the best of luck in your quest to avoid the Bogey Man at all costs.

Why Is a Birdie Called a Birdie in Golf?

Justin Thomas at the 2023 U.S. Open

Justin Thomas Predicted the Final Round of the U.S. Open and Badly Missed the Mark

Phil Mickelson

Phil Mickelson Fails to Crack the Top Half of a LIV Golf Leaderboard Yet Again

Tiger Woods

Mark Calcavecchia Shares a Savage Tiger Woods Story

' src=

Jack Dougherty

Writing professionally since 2015, Jack Dougherty spent six years as a sportswriter with publications such as GoPSUSports.com, the Centre Daily Times, and the Associated Press before joining Sportscasting in 2020. He covers the NBA, the NFL, and the world of golf extensively and has added expertise on any team located in or around his hometown of Philadelphia. Yes, that includes the Philadelphia Eagles, the Philadelphia 76ers, and Philadelphia Phillies .

When Jack isn’t writing about sports, he’s watching them or playing them as he regularly heads to the gym for some pickup basketball or the golf course to hit the links. He’s also an avid participant in the sports betting scene who worked at a casino sportsbook for a year and learned the ins and outs of the industry before bringing his expertise to Sportscasting with one excellent gambling recommendation after another.

bogey a hole

  • More from M-W
  • To save this word, you'll need to log in. Log In

Definition of bogey

 (Entry 1 of 3)

Definition of bogey  (Entry 2 of 3)

transitive verb

less common spelling of bogie entry 1

  • black beast

Examples of bogey in a Sentence

These examples are programmatically compiled from various online sources to illustrate current usage of the word 'bogey.' Any opinions expressed in the examples do not represent those of Merriam-Webster or its editors. Send us feedback about these examples.

Word History

probably alteration of bogle

1826, in the meaning defined at sense 1

1948, in the meaning defined above

Phrases Containing bogey

  • double bogey
  • triple bogey

Dictionary Entries Near bogey

Cite this entry.

“Bogey.” Merriam-Webster.com Dictionary , Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/bogey. Accessed 5 Mar. 2024.

Kids Definition

Kids definition of bogey, more from merriam-webster on bogey.

Nglish: Translation of bogey for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of bogey for Arabic Speakers

Britannica.com: Encyclopedia article about bogey

Subscribe to America's largest dictionary and get thousands more definitions and advanced search—ad free!

Play Quordle: Guess all four words in a limited number of tries.  Each of your guesses must be a real 5-letter word.

Can you solve 4 words at once?

Word of the day.

See Definitions and Examples »

Get Word of the Day daily email!

Popular in Grammar & Usage

8 grammar terms you used to know, but forgot, homophones, homographs, and homonyms, your vs. you're: how to use them correctly, every letter is silent, sometimes: a-z list of examples, more commonly mispronounced words, popular in wordplay, the words of the week - mar. 1, 'blue moon,' 'wolf moon,' and other moons to look for throughout the year, 10 scrabble words without any vowels, 12 more bird names that sound like insults (and sometimes are), 8 uncommon words related to love, games & quizzes.

Play Blossom: Solve today's spelling word game by finding as many words as you can using just 7 letters. Longer words score more points.

Golf Expert Blog

The Shocking Truth About Bogey Golfers: What You Need to Know

Are you a bogey golfer ? Do you struggle to break 90 or 100? Do you feel like you’re stuck in a rut, unable to improve your game no matter how much you practice? If so, you’re not alone. Many golfers find themselves in the same boat, frustrated by their inability to take their game to the next level. But what exactly does it mean to be a bogey golfer? And is there anything you can do to improve your score?

First, let’s define our terms. A bogey golfer is someone who typically shoots one over par on each hole. In other words, if the hole is a par 4, a bogey golfer would take five shots to get the ball in the hole. While this might not sound too bad, it can quickly add up over the course of a round, leading to a high score and a feeling of disappointment.

But don’t despair. In this article, we’ll take a deep dive into the world of bogey golfers, exploring the origins of the term, the psychology behind being a bogey golfer, and the top mistakes that bogey golfers make on the course. We’ll also offer some tips and tricks for breaking out of your bogey golfing habits and improving your game. So if you’re ready to take your golf game to the next level, read on!

Ready to improve your golf game and start playing like a pro? Keep reading to discover the secrets of successful golfers and learn how you can break out of your bogey golfing habits once and for all!

Discover the Real Definition of a Bogey Golfer

When it comes to golf, the term “bogey golfer” is often thrown around, but what does it really mean? Simply put, a bogey golfer is someone who typically shoots one stroke above the par on each hole. For instance, if the hole is a par four, a bogey golfer will typically take five strokes to complete it.

However, there’s more to being a bogey golfer than just their score. It’s a term that’s often associated with beginner or intermediate golfers who are still honing their skills. It’s a phase that many golfers go through on their journey to becoming a better player.

The Evolution of a Bogey Golfer

Every golfer has to start somewhere, and for many, that means being a bogey golfer. Here’s a breakdown of the different stages of a bogey golfer’s evolution:

  • The Beginner Stage: In this stage, the golfer is still learning the basics of the game, including how to grip the club, how to stand, and how to swing. They are still struggling to hit the ball consistently, and their scores reflect that.
  • The Intermediate Stage: At this stage, the golfer has a better understanding of the game and has started to develop some consistency with their swing. They can hit the ball more consistently, but they still struggle with some shots.
  • The Advanced Stage: In this stage, the golfer has a deep understanding of the game and has developed a consistent swing. They can hit the ball with accuracy and can typically avoid major mistakes. They are no longer considered a bogey golfer.

How to Improve Your Game and Move Beyond Being a Bogey Golfer

While being a bogey golfer is nothing to be ashamed of, most golfers want to improve their game and move beyond that stage. Here are a few tips to help you improve your game:

  • Practice, Practice, Practice: The more you practice, the better you will get. Spend time on the driving range and practice your swing and your short game.
  • Get Professional Instruction: A golf instructor can help you identify flaws in your swing and help you correct them.
  • Learn to Manage Your Game: As you become a better golfer, you’ll learn to manage your game more effectively. This means making smart decisions on the course and playing to your strengths.

While it takes time and effort to move beyond being a bogey golfer, it’s a journey that’s well worth taking. The key is to keep practicing, keep learning, and never give up on your dream of becoming a better golfer.

Unveil the Origins of the Term “Bogey”

Have you ever wondered where the term “bogey” comes from? While the word may be ubiquitous in golf, its origins are not widely known. However, the true meaning of “bogey” is shrouded in mystery and debate among golf historians.

Some believe that “bogey” is derived from the Scottish term “bogle,” which means a ghost or goblin. Others suggest that it may have originated from the English slang word “bog,” which means something that is worthless or of little value. Yet another theory is that it comes from the phrase “boogeyman,” which refers to a mythical creature that is meant to scare children.

The Evolution of “Bogey” in Golf

The term “bogey” first appeared in golf in the late 19th century, where it was used to describe a score of one stroke above par for a hole. At the time, par was not yet an established concept in golf, and each hole was played to a specific number of strokes deemed appropriate by the local club.

The Introduction of “Par”

In 1911, the concept of “par” was officially introduced by the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews. This standardized the number of strokes a skilled golfer was expected to make on each hole, and made it easier for players to keep track of their progress.

  • Bogey – One stroke over par
  • Par – The expected number of strokes a skilled golfer should take to complete the hole
  • Birdie – One stroke under par

The Popularity of “Bogey”

While “par” became the more widely used term in golf, “bogey” remained popular among players and is still commonly used today. The term has even evolved to include additional meanings, such as “bogey golfer” to describe a player who consistently scores one stroke over par on most holes.

Understanding the origins and evolution of golf terminology can deepen one’s appreciation for the game. Now that you know the true meaning of “bogey,” you can impress your golfing buddies with your newfound knowledge.

The Psychology Behind Being a Bogey Golfer

Being a bogey golfer can be a frustrating experience, especially when it seems like you’re just one stroke away from breaking par. But have you ever wondered what goes on in the mind of a bogey golfer? What makes them tick, and what keeps them coming back for more?

Research has shown that being a bogey golfer can actually be a positive experience, as it requires a great deal of mental toughness and resilience. In fact, many bogey golfers have a unique mindset that allows them to perform better under pressure and stay calm in difficult situations.

The Fear of Failure

One of the key psychological factors behind being a bogey golfer is the fear of failure. When you’re constantly striving for perfection and falling short, it can be easy to become discouraged and lose motivation. However, many bogey golfers have learned to embrace their imperfections and use them as fuel for improvement.

By accepting that they may never be perfect and focusing on the process of improvement rather than the outcome, bogey golfers are able to stay motivated and continue pushing themselves to get better.

The Power of Persistence

Another important psychological factor behind being a bogey golfer is persistence. Bogey golfers often have a never-give-up attitude that allows them to keep going even when things aren’t going their way. This persistence can be a valuable asset both on and off the golf course , as it helps bogey golfers overcome obstacles and achieve their goals.

By focusing on the process of improvement rather than the outcome, bogey golfers are able to maintain a positive attitude and keep moving forward. This attitude can be contagious, inspiring others to push themselves to be their best as well.

The Joy of the Game

Finally, many bogey golfers simply love the game of golf. They appreciate the challenge it provides, the beauty of the courses they play, and the camaraderie of their fellow golfers. While breaking par may be a distant dream, bogey golfers find joy in the pursuit of excellence and the satisfaction of knowing that they’ve given it their all.

So if you’re a bogey golfer, take heart. You’re in good company, and there’s much to be gained from the experience. Keep pushing yourself to be your best, and remember to enjoy the journey along the way.

Learn How to Break Out of Your Bogey Golfing Habits

Do you find yourself consistently scoring bogeys on the golf course? Breaking out of bogey golfing habits can be challenging, but it is not impossible. Here are some tips to help you improve your game:

The first step is to identify the areas of your game that need improvement. Are you struggling with your short game or is it your long game? Once you identify the areas that need improvement, you can focus on practicing those specific skills. Another way to improve your game is to play with someone who is better than you. Observing their techniques and learning from them can be a valuable experience.

Practice Makes Perfect

The old saying “practice makes perfect” holds true when it comes to golf. Practicing regularly can help you improve your skills and break out of your bogey golfing habits. Consider practicing at a driving range, on a putting green, or playing a round with a friend. Remember to focus on the areas of your game that need improvement.

Get the Right Equipment

Having the right equipment can make a big difference in your golf game. Make sure that your clubs are properly fitted for your body type and swing style. Consider investing in clubs that are specifically designed for the areas of your game that need improvement.

Stay Mentally Focused

Golf is as much a mental game as it is a physical one. Staying mentally focused and calm can help you break out of your bogey golfing habits. Try to stay relaxed and avoid getting too frustrated when things don’t go your way. Take a deep breath and refocus on your next shot.

Breaking out of your bogey golfing habits takes time and practice, but with these tips, you can improve your game and become a better golfer. Remember to stay focused, practice regularly, and get the right equipment to help you succeed.

The Top Mistakes Bogey Golfers Make on the Course

If you’re a bogey golfer, you’re probably no stranger to making mistakes on the course. But did you know that there are some common mistakes that many bogey golfers make that are easily avoidable? Here are some of the top mistakes that bogey golfers make and how to avoid them.

  • Focusing too much on distance

One of the biggest mistakes that bogey golfers make is focusing too much on distance. While distance is certainly important, it’s not the only factor that contributes to a successful golf shot. Instead, focus on making solid contact with the ball and hitting it straight. By doing this, you’ll likely end up with a better overall result than if you just focus on hitting the ball as far as possible.

Other mistakes bogey golfers make include:

  • Not taking enough practice swings

Trying to make up for bad shots with risky shots

  • Not knowing when to lay up

Another mistake that bogey golfers often make is not taking enough practice swings. Practice swings can help you get a feel for the shot and help you make necessary adjustments before you actually hit the ball. By taking a few practice swings before each shot, you’ll likely end up hitting the ball more consistently and with better results.

When bogey golfers hit a bad shot, they often try to make up for it by hitting a risky shot to try and recover. While this can sometimes work out, more often than not it just leads to even more trouble. Instead, focus on making smart, conservative shots that can help you get back on track without risking even more mistakes.

What Separates a Bogey Golfer from a Par Golfer?

Golf is a sport that requires a combination of skill, strategy, and mental toughness. While many golfers dream of achieving a par , others struggle to consistently score a bogey . So, what separates a bogey golfer from a par golfer? Here are some factors to consider:

Firstly, it’s important to note that par golfers consistently shoot par because they have mastered the fundamentals of the game. This includes having a consistent and repeatable swing, a strong short game, and a good understanding of course management. Practice is key to honing these skills, as well as having a good golf instructor or mentor to guide you.

Factors that Separate a Bogey Golfer from a Par Golfer

  • Consistency: Par golfers are able to consistently hit the ball straight and avoid hazards. This is because they have a consistent swing that they have practiced and refined over time. They also make smart decisions on the course, taking into account their strengths and weaknesses as well as the layout of the course.
  • Short Game: Another factor that separates bogey golfers from par golfers is their short game. Par golfers are skilled at chipping, pitching, and putting, which allows them to save strokes around the green. They also have a good understanding of how to read the green and adjust their putting accordingly.

Tips for Becoming a Par Golfer

If you want to become a par golfer, it’s important to focus on the fundamentals of the game. This means practicing your swing, working on your short game, and improving your course management skills. Additionally, here are some tips:

  • Get a Golf Instructor: A good golf instructor can help you identify areas of your game that need improvement and provide guidance on how to address them.
  • Play Consistently: The more you play, the better you will get. Try to play at least once a week, and practice as often as you can.
  • Focus on Your Short Game: The short game is where you can save the most strokes, so it’s important to practice chipping, pitching, and putting regularly.

With time, patience, and dedication, you too can become a par golfer. Remember, it’s not just about hitting the ball far, but also about playing smart and consistently. By focusing on the fundamentals and following these tips, you can improve your game and start shooting lower scores.

The Pros and Cons of Being a Bogey Golfer

Being a bogey golfer can be a source of frustration for some, but it can also have its advantages. Here are some pros and cons to consider:

Lower Expectations

One advantage of being a bogey golfer is that you don’t have to deal with the pressure of consistently shooting par or better. This can make the game more enjoyable and allow you to focus on having fun rather than feeling like you need to perform at a certain level.

Lower Costs

Another advantage of being a bogey golfer is that it can be less expensive than trying to compete at a higher level. You may not need the latest and greatest equipment or membership to an exclusive club in order to enjoy the game at your level.

Improvement Potential

As a bogey golfer, there is always room for improvement, and small gains can lead to big improvements in your score over time. This can be a motivating factor for some players.

Limited Opportunities

One disadvantage of being a bogey golfer is that it can limit your opportunities to compete at a higher level or play on more challenging courses. Some tournaments and courses have minimum handicap requirements that may be higher than what a bogey golfer can achieve.

Frustration

While lower expectations can be a pro, they can also lead to frustration when you feel like you’re not improving or making progress in your game. It can be difficult to stay motivated and enjoy the game when you’re not seeing the results you want.

Limited Respect

Finally, being a bogey golfer can lead to a lack of respect from other players who may view your level of play as less skilled or competitive. This can be discouraging for some players and make the game less enjoyable overall.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the definition of a bogey golfer.

A bogey golfer is a player who typically scores one stroke over par on each hole. This means that on a par-3 hole, a bogey golfer would score a 4, on a par-4 hole, they would score a 5, and on a par-5 hole, they would score a

How does a bogey golfer differ from a par golfer?

A par golfer typically scores a par on each hole, which means they are able to complete the hole in the number of strokes that the course has set as the standard. In contrast, a bogey golfer is unable to complete the hole in the set number of strokes and typically scores one stroke more than par.

Is it bad to be a bogey golfer?

Not necessarily. While being a bogey golfer means that you are not able to score par on each hole, it is still a respectable score and can be enjoyed by many golfers. It is a great goal for many players to work towards, and it is a good starting point for new golfers to strive for.

What is the average score for a bogey golfer?

The average score for a bogey golfer is typically around 90 strokes for 18 holes of golf. This is based on the assumption that a bogey golfer scores one stroke over par on each hole, and there are 18 holes in a round of golf. However, this can vary depending on the player’s skill level and the difficulty of the course.

How can a bogey golfer improve their score?

A bogey golfer can improve their score by practicing regularly, working on their swing and technique, and learning the strategies of the game. It is also important to focus on course management and avoid taking unnecessary risks. Taking lessons from a professional instructor can also be beneficial in improving a golfer’s score.

Can a bogey golfer ever become a par golfer?

Yes, it is possible for a bogey golfer to become a par golfer with enough practice, dedication, and effort. It may take time and effort to improve their skills and lower their score, but with persistence and a willingness to learn, any golfer can improve their game.

Privacy Overview

Golf Sidekick

Golf Scoring Terms and Meanings for Dummies

Last Updated on December 26, 2023 by Matt Greene

What is par?

Par is the standard that golfers try to achieve. It is important to note that par is a score which an  expert golfer  or  professional golfer would be expected to make on that individual hole. Most golfers expected score on a hole could be anywhere from 1 to 3 shots over par depending on their golfing ability and experience.

How does par work?

Every hole on a course is given its own par rating which is defined loosely by the length of an individual hole. Typically, longer holes require more shots to complete, therefore the par for these holes is greater in comparison to holes with fewer yards. 

Is par a good score?

If you're making pars on the golf course, you are playing to a high standard. Professional golfers will make mostly pars when playing a complete round. Recreational golfers making pars regularly should be proud. A scratch golfer would be considered to be playing to a par score regularly.

How many strokes to score a par?

Most golf courses will consist of par 3, par 4 and par 5 holes. On a par four for example, an expert golfer is expected to score four shorts: hit two shots to reach the green, then take two putts to get the ball into the hole.

A scorecard would read like this for 3 pars in a row:

what is par on the scorecard in golf

What is  par for 18 holes in golf?

Par over 18 holes is usually 72 strokes. Some course may be as much as par 74 or 73. There are executive courses which could be a lower par, from par 54 to par 69. Most professional level golf courses will have pars between 70 and 73.

What is  par for 9 holes?

Half a round is usually the 18 hole par divided by any random 9 holes could have a par anywhere between 27 and 38 .

What does par 72 mean?

Par 72 means that the 18 holes on that golf course should be playable by a scratch handicap in 72 strokes. 

Scoring relationship and par

If you have ever watched golf on the television, you will have heard the golf terms "level par", "even par", "under par" and "over par."

These are used to describe a player's scoring relationship relative to par. For example if a player plays the first hole of a golf course, (a par 4) in for shots, they would be level par or even par through one hole. If they then made a hole in one on the next par 3, (unlikely) they would be 2 under par.

Here's a link to more golfing terms .

What does under par mean in golf?

Under par means the golfer scores a number of strokes into the hole, less than the number stipulated on the scorecard. The names for these scores are birdie , eagle and albatross. 

On a par 4, that would be 3 or fewer strokes.

On a par 5, that would be 4 or fewer strokes.

On a par 3, that would be 2 or fewer strokes.

Over 9 holes, you can add up a score and be considered 'under par' if your total score is below the total number for par on that nine.

Over 18 holes, you add up your score and be considered 'under par' if your total score is below the total number for par on that course.

What is an eagle in golf?

Scoring an "eagle" means to get the ball in the hole in 2 strokes under par for that golf hole. It is a score which is usually made by expert or professional golfers.

How many shots do you need to score an eagle?

We know that an eagle corresponds to getting the ball into the hole in 2 under the par of that hole. Therefore to score an eagle, you would need to have the ball in the hole in:

One stroke on a par-3 hole

This is normally called a  hole in one  and is extremely rare! Pretty much a miracle golf shot. 

Two strokes on a par-4 hole is an eagle.

Usually a result of a holed approach shot or chip in. In golf terms this is still pretty rare but can happen on shorter holes. 

Three strokes on a par-5 hole is an eagle.

Most eagles are made this way. Hit the ball off the tee, second shot hits the putting green, hole the putt. 

What shape is used for an Eagle on a scorecard?

Two concentric circles are used to represent an eagle on a scorecard or a PGA Tour overlay.

eagle on a scorecard two concentric circles

Where does the term eagle come from?

The basis of the term eagle is linked with the other ornithological golfing term “ birdie .” An eagle is a big rare bird or "big birdie" and is thus considered to be less common and better version of a "birdie." It's one of many golfing terms which we need to learn. 

Golfer making a golf swing

What’s better than an eagle in golf?

A double-eagle or albatross is better than an eagle. So albatross or double-eagle is 3-under par. And it’s supposed to be an even more infrequent or rarer occurrence in the game of golf, hence even more celebratory.

What is a double-eagle?

A double eagle (also known as an albatross) is a score of 3-under par on the hole, which, only when possible, is done on a par-4 hole and a par-5 hole.

A par-4 double eagle would require a hole-in-one. Double eagle can be made on a par-5 if you hold your second shot.

What is a birdie in golf?

A player makes a birdie when he uses one fewer strokes than the par of the hole.

Let's break this down using an example from the golf course. We are on a par 4 hole. The aim here is to get the ball into the cup in 4 shots, to make par. If you manage to get the ball into the hole in 3 shots, this would be 1 under par for that hole and called a birdie. If you were on a par 5 hole and took 4 strokes to hole out, this would also be a birdie. 

What is double bogey in golf?

A Double Bogey is a golfing term that refers to a player scoring two strokes more than the  par of the particular hole that they are playing. It's one of the more common golf scoring terms and will be all too familiar to most recreational golfers!

Ideally, we want to avoid double bogey at all costs, but for most golfers it's an inevitable part of a round of golf. 

Here's a quick guide to make it super clear what scores make up a double bogey on holes with a different par rating:

  • A score of 5 is a double bogey in a par 3 hole
  • A score of 6 is a double bogey in a par 4 hole
  • A score of 7 is a double bogey in a par 5 hole

What shape is used for a double bogey?

On scorecards and on the overlays in the PGA Tour broadcasts, you'll see shapes around the numbers on the scoreboard. When you score a double bogey, you can draw a double square around the number to represent and make it easier to count the score up at the end. 

bogey a hole

Is a double bogey good?

If you're a total beginner golfer, double bogey is actually a good score on the golf course. As you get better, you will try to eliminate double bogey as a score. For professional golfers, scores of bogey or double bogey are pretty disastrous for their score.

What's worse than a double bogey?

A triple bogey or quadruple bogey is worse than a double bogey. While double bogey is two over regulation par for a scratch golfer, a triple bogey is 3 over par while a quadruple bogey is 4 over. No one wants these!

Does everyone make double bogeys?

The simple answer is, yes! Even the best golfers will make double bogeys and worse throughout their golfing life so don't be too hard on yourself when you inevitably make one. the best thing you can do is put a bad score behind you and move onto the next hole. Who knows, your next shot could be your best shot.

Double bogey golf handicap

If you make double bogey on every hole, your handicap will be around 30. Your score will be 108 shots or 36 over par on a par 72 course. 

What Are Bogey Competitions In Golf?

Bogey competitions, which date from 1891, are a way of playing matchplay against the course

  • Sign up to Golf Monthly Newsletter Newsletter

bogey competitions

What are bogey competitions in golf?

In bogey competitions a player takes on the course itself in matchplay . The course scores bogey on each hole – bogey here is defined as in the original meaning of that word, the score that a good player should be expected to make on that hole. All 18 holes are played and the player’s score is the nett number of holes won (so, the nett score may be a minus figure).

Nowadays, only a few of the more traditional golf clubs are likely to have a bogey score and a par score listed on their scorecard. Bogey competitions may therefore, of necessity, be played against par instead. Or a club or competition organiser may simply devise a bogey scorecard specifically for the competition.

Sometimes, if played against par, this type of competition is known as a par competition instead. Scores in par competitions will be lower than in bogey competitions as the aggregate bogey score will normally be around 5-6 shots a round higher than the par one.

The concept of a bogey competition is therefore similar to that of the competition later devised by Dr Frank Stableford and which now bears his name, in that on each hole you are rewarded on how you do against the course. Just like in a Stableford competition, the par is adjusted for each hole according to a player’s course handicap and the stroke index of the hole.

According to the R&A, the first bogey competitions were played at Coventry Golf Club in 1891. Originally all golf competitions were played as matchplay ones, so played as a series of knockouts. Bogey competitions incorporated the central feature of matchplay - the winning or losing of individual holes - into a strokeplay competition.

As bogey and par competitions are played as strokeplay competitions, all the rules and penalties are the strokeplay ones. The winner of the competition is the player who wins the most nett holes.

Get the Golf Monthly Newsletter

Subscribe to the Golf Monthly newsletter to stay up to date with all the latest tour news, equipment news, reviews, head-to-heads and buyer’s guides from our team of experienced experts.

Contributing Writer Golf courses and travel are Roderick’s particular interests and he was contributing editor for the first few years of the Golf Monthly Travel Supplement. He writes travel articles and general features for the magazine, travel supplement and website. He also compiles the magazine's crossword. He is a member of Trevose Golf & Country Club and has played golf in around two dozen countries. Cricket is his other main sporting love. He is the author of five books, four of which are still in print: T he Novel Life of PG Wodehouse ; The Don: Beyond Boundaries ; Wally Hammond: Gentleman & Player and England’s Greatest Post-War All Rounder .

PGA Tour member Mackenzie Hughes claimed the 'gross' title alongside partner, Frank Edwards while Erik van Rooyen and John Pinkham secured the 'net' prize at Seminole Golf Club

By Jonny Leighfield Published 5 March 24

Unable to attend the Masters? Well why not bring the historic event to your own home with the official Hosting Kit from Augusta National

By Matt Cradock Published 5 March 24

  • Contact Future's experts
  • Terms and conditions
  • Privacy policy
  • Accessibility statement
  • Cookies policy
  • Advertise with us

Golf Monthly is part of Future plc, an international media group and leading digital publisher. Visit our corporate site . © Future Publishing Limited Quay House, The Ambury, Bath BA1 1UA. All rights reserved. England and Wales company registration number 2008885.

What Is a 'Double Bogey' Score in Golf?

Examples of the Scores That Result in a Double Bogey

  • Golf Courses
  • Famous Golfers
  • Golf Tournaments
  • Bodybuilding
  • Cheerleading
  • Extreme Sports
  • Martial Arts
  • Professional Wrestling
  • Skateboarding
  • Swimming & Diving
  • Table Tennis
  • Track & Field
  • Other Activities

A "double bogey" is a score of two-over par on an individual hole of the golf course .

Par , remember, is the number of strokes an expert golfer is expected to need to play a golf hole. Every hole on a golf course is given a number representing its par rating. A par-3 hole, for example, is expected to take an expert golfer three strokes to complete. And a golfer who does score "3" on a par-3 hole is said to have "made a par."

A golfer makes a "double bogey" when he or she needs two strokes more than par to complete the play of a hole.

A golfer whose average score per hole is a double bogey will average 36-over par (two-over per hole times 18 holes) for his rounds, or roughly in the upper 90s to low 100s in score. Most recreational golfers score in that range (or higher), making most recreational golfers "double bogey golfers."

The Scores That Result in a Double Bogey

These are the specific scores that mean a golfer has made a double bogey:

  • A score of five on a par-3 hole is a double bogey;
  • Scoring a six on a par-4 hole is a double bogey;
  • Scoring a seven on a par-5 hole is a double bogey.

Par-6 holes are rare in golf, but they do exist, so making a score of eight on a par-6 hole is also a double bogey.

Unlike Some Golf Nomenclature, 'Double Bogey' Makes Sense

Not all of golf's scoring terms actually makes sense. A birdie is a score of one-under par on a hole. So shouldn't a score of two -under be a "double birdie"? It isn't—that score is called an eagle . OK, if a score of two-under is an eagle, shouldn't a " double eagle " mean four-under? It doesn't—it means 3-under.

No, golf' scoring nomenclature doesn't always follow logical rules, or math. But "double bogey" does. In fact, all of the bogey-related scoring terms do:

  • Double bogey is two-over par.
  • Triple bogey is three-over par.
  • Quadruple bogey is four-over par, and so on.

Since a " bogey " is a score of one-over, it makes sense to call a score of two -over a double bogey (two is double one, after all).

Usage and Other Spellings

Note that the word "bogey" entered the golf lexicon in the 1890s and, yes, it is related to the Bogey Man . "Bogey" and "par" were originally synonyms; they referred to the same scores. Over time, bogey took on the different meaning of one-over par.

Once "bogey" was in use for one-over par, golfers just added the double, triple and other prefixes to denote higher scores.

"Bogie" is a common misspelling of "bogey." You can also use "double bogey" as a verb: "I need to double bogey the final hole to finish under 90."

The past-tense of "bogey" is "bogeyed": "He bogeyed two of the past four holes."

The Nickname for Double Bogey

There is also a slang term for "double bogey" that is rarely used today, but was once very common. In the early parts of the 20th century, "buzzard" was sometimes used in place of "double bogey." That's in keeping with the avian theme of many golf scoring terms (birdie, eagle, albatross , condor ).

  • Triple Bogey: What the Golf Scoring Term Means
  • What Is a Bogey? Definition of the Golf Score
  • The Meaning of 'Over Par' in Golf, With Scoring Examples
  • How to Play the Stableford or Modified Stableford Golf Format
  • Birdie: What This Scoring Term Means in Golf
  • How the System 36 Handicap Formula Works in Golf
  • What You Need to Know About Golf's World Handicap System
  • Golf Tournament Formats, Side Games and Golf Bets
  • Meet the Golf Course
  • What Is an Eagle In Golf? How Do You Make One?
  • The Worst Golf Chokes and Collapses
  • How Golf Handicaps Work: Overview of Their Role and Function
  • What Is a Double Eagle in Golf?
  • Explaining the Score Called a Condor in Golf
  • What Is a Par-4 Hole in Golf?
  • What Does a Score of Even Par Mean in Golf?

The Left Rough

Golf Scorecard Symbols: How to Decipher the Shapes

If you’re new to golf, trying to read a golf scorecard with symbols is like trying to decipher hieroglyphics sometimes with squares above par holes, circles, triangles, and more.

But there’s a reason for the golf scoring symbols you see on a completed scorecard. It helps you quickly differentiate birdies, pars, bogeys and more. 

And if you know how to read the scoring symbols, you can easily tell where you stand during any given round without pulling out the calculator! 

Keep reading to learn more about these symbols and other scorecard best practices in golf.

Golf Scoring Symbols Explained

A golf scorecard is more than just a place to tally up your final score. Some golfers keep net scores, others track which golf clubs they use on certain holes, and others use it for the number of strokes on the greens.

But the symbols might not be as common for every golfer. Here are the most common symbols you will see notated on a golf scorecard.

No Symbol = Par Score

Sometimes no symbols around your score on a hole is a good thing. When you don’t have any geometric shape surrounding your score, that means you made a par. So if you get a four on a par 4, you won’t have anything around your score.

It’s very rare but sometimes you can get a “clean card” which means 18 pars in a golf round. This is very rare even for elite golfers as bogeys and birdies tend to offset. If you do get a clean card, make sure to frame it as it likely won’t happen again. 

Even if you don’t remember much from geometry class, you want to remember that circles in golf are good. A circle around your score means you made a birdie on the hole! The more birdies you can get, the better. 

Two Circles

If you have a score with two circles around the final score, then it’s even better! A double circle means you made an eagle which isn’t very common for the average golfer. But that’s not the only score it could mean.  

A double circle can also mean a hole in one too. If you get the once in a lifetime ace on a par 3, that also results in two circles around your “1.” Like a clean card, make sure you save the ball and frame that scorecard. 

Three Circles

I’ve played golf for a long time and never had the chance to write three circles around a score. Three circles means the very rare double eagle which is also referred to as an albatross. 

The only time this happens is an ace on a par 4 or a two on a par 5. Either way, it’s going to take a miracle shot to make it happen and even more rare than a hole in one. 

Square 

A square isn’t the end of the world and very common for the everyday golfer as it constitutes a bogey on the hole. For example, if your final score on the hole is five on a par 4, your score would receive a square. 

If you’re a “bogey golfer” then you would typically have close to 18 squares during the round. But you could also have a few pars (no symbols) and a few double bogeys as well. 

Two Squares

Speaking of double bogeys, the symbol for that score is two squares. A double bogey is two over on a hole. 

For example, if you make a seven on a par 5, this is a double. Try to avoid these if at all possible as it’s not easy to bounce back from a double bogey. 

Triangle 

A triangle can mean two different terms depending on the app and is a gray area in the history of golf. 

First, a triangle on a golf scorecard means a triple bogey (or worse). 

While you want to avoid squares if possible, they’re pretty common for the everyday golfer. But a symbol you really want to avoid is a triangle.

Conversely, some people use a triangle symbol to represent an ace as well. I’ve never understood this because an ace is really an eagle on a par 3, which is two circles.

Dots on a Golf Scorecard Explained

If you play in a tournament that has a gross and net division it’s not uncommon to see dots as well. A dot on the hole means you get a stroke for the net division.  

For example, let’s say you’re a 12 handicap golfer. 

On the hardest 12 holes (each hole has a rank from 1-18, hard to the easiest on the scorecard) you would get a dot. This is reflected in the net score for the hole. 

So if you have a dot on the hole and make a five on a par 4, the dot means you get a stroke on the hole. Your gross score of five is now a net four. 

If you have a handicap higher than 18 you will have two dots on certain holes. This will remove two strokes off your net score.

For example, if you’re a 22 handicap golfer you will get one dot on the 14 easiest holes and two dots on the hardest four holes. So if you make a 6 on a two dot hole, your net score will be a four.

Golf Symbols for Scores

Golf Scorecard Scoring on Apps 

If you’re the type of golfer who prefers to keep score on a golf app, there might be some differences to the traditional symbols. For example, Golf Pad GPS changes a few symbols.

While a par remains no symbol, a solid circle means an eagle (or better) as opposed to two circles. While a solid square means a double bogey (or worse). There are no triangles either on most golf apps.

3 Scorecard Tips 

Now that you have a better understanding of a scorecard, let’s get into a few best practices. 

1. Use a Scorecard Holder 

The biggest thing with a scorecard is to make sure you don’t lose it! When you’re riding in a golf cart, make sure to keep the scorecard secure on the steering wheel (and the pencil too).

If you’re using a pushcart , make sure to keep the scorecard clipped in or inside one of the secure pouches. If you’re walking and carrying your golf bag, buy a scorecard holder or keep it inside a yardage guide if you have one. 

2. Use an App

If you want to track your statistics and/or don’t want to depend on someone else keeping your score, use an app. There are tons of apps for all types of phones to easily track your scores and more. This is also a good idea to use when it’s raining and the scorecard might get wet too.  Here’s our list of favorite golf apps .

3. Don’t Add Up the Scores 

Finally, please make sure to not be the golfer that adds up a score after 9 or 17 holes. Whenever someone does this and announces it to the group, it only adds extra pressure and expectation for the rest of the round.

Knowing your score leads to golfers thinking too much and often letting their mind drift. I’ve seen so many players have a great 9 or 17 holes only to collapse down the stretch. Wait until the final putt drops to add up the score. 

Other Golf Scorecard Features 

While each scorecard is unique based on the course, there are some other features on all cards like the hole number.

Tee Boxes/Distance

Each golf course will display the multiple sets of tee boxes and length for each hole. Most golf courses have at least three sets of tees while others have 5-6 tee boxes. This ensures that there is a tee box for every type of golfer. 

The hardest tee boxes are the longest ones and are notated at the top of the scorecard (these are known as the tips). While the shortest set of tees are lowest on the scorecard.

Additionally, sometimes courses have a “combo” set of tees where golfers play certain holes of one tee box and others from a different tee. A good example of this is a male golfer playing the blue/white combo. They would typically play the white tees on longer holes and blue tees on shorter holes. 

Always play the appropriate tee box for your handicap index!

Slope Rating and Course Rating

On the left side of the scorecard next to the tee box color is the slope rating of the course. This is often something like 74.1/139. 

These numbers refer to the average score for a scratch golfer and the slope is based on a sliding scale for bogey golfers. 

You can learn more about slope rating here .

Par of Hole 

Every golf scorecard will also have the par on the hole (typically a 3, 4, or 5). While some golf courses have a par 6, this is extremely uncommon.

Additionally, some holes will have a 4/5 as the par depending on the player and/or tee box. For example, if a man is playing the hole it’s a par 4 but if a woman is playing the same tee box, it’s a par 5.

Most full-length golf courses are par 72 while there are some that are 70, 71, and rarely, a par 73. While shorter, executive style golf courses are much less. 

Handicap Index

The last line before the boxes is the handicap index for the hole. All holes are ranked between 1-18, with one being the hardest and 18 being the easiest golf hole. 

The handicap of each hole is also important as it factors in with gambling games where you need to give strokes to fellow players. For example, if you are giving a player 10 strokes, they would get a stroke on the 10 hardest holes (not just any 10 holes). 

Their handicap score would be -1 of their gross score (these are known as net scores).

Signature and Attest

Most golf course scorecards will also have a place for the scorekeeper and player to sign the card. If you’re playing in a formal golf tournament, each card must have two signatures or the scorecard is invalid and that player is disqualified.

Do not forget to sign your scorecard after the round or your score doesn’t count! 

Local Rules 

Lastly, it’s common for scorecards to also have local rules for the course as well. These are rules specific to the golf course and might include things like:

  • Local water hazard rules
  • Any ball outside the roads is out of bounds
  • All golf balls in flower beds get free (and mandatory) relief

FAQs About Golf Scorecard Symbols 

Do you have more questions about circles and squares on a golf scorecard? If so, keep reading to learn more and improve your golf game knowledge.

What is a triangle on a golf scorecard? 

A triangle can mean two different things in golf. 

Some players use a triangle to represent a triple bogey or worse on a hole. While others use it to represent an ace.

What are the dots on a golf scorecard? 

Dots on a scorecard are related to your golf handicap . It’s common to see dots in golf tournaments with net scoring. 

How do you read a golf scorecard? 

A golf scorecard has all kinds of things including spots for your names, scores, par of each hole, slope/rating, and more. Once you add your score, you have the option to use symbols to 

What are the 7 golf scoring terms? 

The seven most common scoring terms include eagle, birdie, par, bogey, double bogey, triple bogey and a hole in one. Other terms include albatross, condor, snowman (quadruple bogey) and countless others.  Learn all the golf scoring names here.

What happens if you sign the wrong scorecard?

Bad news if you sign the wrong scorecard! 

If you sign the scorecard with a higher score, you have to accept the mistake but luckily, you don’t get disqualified. However, if you sign a scorecard that is lower than your score, you are disqualified from the event. 

This is why it’s crucial to track your score during the round and double-check the hole by hole score before signing it. 

What is the C word in golf? 

The “C” word in golf is usually referred to as choking. While the “S” word stands for shank and the “Y” word stands for the  yips .

I’d suggest keeping these three words from your vocabulary to not put a jinx on any of your playing partners. 

What is a kitty in golf? 

Kitty refers to the total money won at the end of the round. To learn more about common terms and phrases in golf  click here . 

Final Thoughts on Golf Scorecards

Hopefully you have a better understanding of the symbols of a golf scorecard.

While these symbols are helpful to add up your score easier, don’t feel like you need to do them. If you use a golf app or use the scorecard in your golf cart GPS, they tend to make the symbols for you. 

Princeton grad Evan Harmeling among Puerto Rico Open's Monday qualifiers

Monday Qualifiers

Evan Harmeling, 35, will make his first career TOUR start at the Puerto Rico Open. (Alex Goodlett/Getty Images)

Evan Harmeling, 35, will make his first career TOUR start at the Puerto Rico Open. (Alex Goodlett/Getty Images)

15-year-old Miles Russell falls short in playoff

Change Text Size

Four players qualified for this week's Puerto Rico Open via Monday's open qualifier: Michael Gligic , Jeff Overton , Ryan Cole and Evan Harmeling .

Harmeling took the final spot via a 4-for-1 playoff, outlasting the trio of Miles Russell, Xinjun Zhang and Patrick Flavin.

Russell, 15, won last year's Junior PLAYERS Championship and held the clubhouse lead for much of Monday before ultimately falling short in the playoff. The high school freshman hails from Jacksonville Beach, Florida, and was named the 2023 AJGA Rolex Boys Player of the Year, breaking Tiger Woods' mark as the award's youngest winner.

Gligic and Overton advanced through a Monday qualifier for the second straight week, having each qualified for the Cognizant Classic in The Palm Beaches last Monday. Cole will compete in his second career TOUR event, having also Monday qualified for last year's Wells Fargo Championship. Harmeling, a Princeton alum who has won on the Korn Ferry Tour and PGA TOUR Latinoamerica, will make his TOUR debut.

Evan Harmeling mic'd up at The Panama Championship

The 18-hole Puerto Rico Open qualifier was contested at Wellington National Golf Club in West Palm Beach, Florida, with the four qualifiers advancing to compete at Grand Reserve Golf Club in Rio Grande, Puerto Rico.

Michael Gligic (7-under 65)

Age: 34 Hometown: Burlington, Ontario, Canada Alma mater: N/A PGA TOUR starts: 108 Cuts made: 47 Best PGA TOUR finish: T4, 2021 Corales Puntacana Championship

Notes: Made six birdies and an eagle against one bogey in qualifying round, his second straight Monday as a successful qualifier. Last week, shot 67 at Cognizant Classic's Monday qualifier and advanced via a playoff (he then missed the cut at PGA National) ... Finished No. 205 on last year's FedExCup Fall standings to lose PGA TOUR status ... First earned TOUR card via 2019 Korn Ferry Tour; season was highlighted by a victory at The Panama Championship. Also earned back his TOUR card via 2021 and 2022 Korn Ferry Tour Finals ... Spent 12 years as a hockey goalie before deciding to pursue golf ... Completed his final semester of high school online to move to the Orlando area and work with Sean Foley ... Played 88 events on PGA TOUR Canada, including a win and three runner-up finishes.

Jeff Overton (6-under 66)

Age: 40 Hometown: Evansville, Indiana Alma mater: Indiana University PGA TOUR starts: 299 Cuts made: 194 Best PGA TOUR finish: Runner-up, four times

Notes: Made six birdies in a bogey-free qualifying round, his second straight Monday as a successful qualifier. Last week, shot 66 at Cognizant Classic's Monday qualifier to earn a spot at PGA National (he missed the cut) ... Amid a comeback from a life-threatening infection suffered during a routine surgery for a herniated disk on his back; returned to competition in summer 2022 after making just one TOUR start in a six-year span ... Played four TOUR events in 2023 but didn't make a cut. Played eight Korn Ferry Tour events in 2023, missing the first seven cuts but finishing T23 at the Magnit Championship in August ... Competed for the U.S. Team at the 2010 Ryder Cup.

Ryan Cole (6-under 66)

Age: 28 Hometown: Frederick, Maryland Alma mater: James Madison University PGA TOUR starts: 1 Cuts made: 0

Notes: Made five birdies and an eagle against one bogey in qualifying round ... Set for his second TOUR start; also Monday qualified for last year's Wells Fargo Championship, where he missed the cut ... Has made 14 of 30 cuts on PGA TOUR Latinoamerica starts, highlighted by a T5 at the 2021 Scotia Wealth Management Chile Open ... Avid fan of Baltimore Ravens and Baltimore Orioles ... Likes to eat sushi and different Asian foods ... Would like to trade places for a day with Justin Timberlake.

Evan Harmeling (5-under 67, advanced via playoff)

Age: 35 Hometown: Boston, Massachusetts Alma mater: Princeton University PGA TOUR starts: 0

Notes: Began his qualifying round with eight birdies and eight pars, then suffered a triple bogey at his 17th hole, the par-4 eighth at Wellington National. Closed with a par to earn a spot in 4-for-1 playoff, from which he advanced to earn his first career PGA TOUR start ... Has made 77 career Korn Ferry Tour starts, highlighted by a victory at the 2020 Club Car Championship at The Landings Golf & Athletic Club. This season, is 2-for-3 in made cuts on Korn Ferry Tour ... Made 69 career starts on PGA TOUR Latinoamerica, highlighted by a victory at 2019 BMW Jamaica Classic ... Last fall, launched the Evan and Ariel Harmeling Foundation , alongside wife Ariel, to support youth education and after-school programs. The cause is close to his heart; he spent four months working at an Achievement First charter school in Connecticut during a college gap year ... Has also worked in the meat department of J. Pace & Son, an Italian supermarket in Boston ... Made a hole-in-one to win a car during the 2018 Visa Argentina Open presented by Macro; gave his caddie the car.

Evan Harmeling makes a hole in one in at 113 VISA Open de Argentina

  • Election 2024
  • Entertainment
  • Newsletters
  • Photography
  • Press Releases
  • Israel-Hamas War
  • Russia-Ukraine War
  • Latin America
  • Middle East
  • Asia Pacific
  • AP Top 25 College Football Poll
  • Movie reviews
  • Book reviews
  • Financial Markets
  • Business Highlights
  • Financial wellness
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Social Media

Ramey, Kim each shoot bogey-free 64s at PGA National, grab early lead at Cognizant Classic

Rory McIlroy of Northern Ireland hits from the rough on the eighth green during the first round of the Cognizant Classic golf tournament, Thursday, Feb. 29, 2024, in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. (AP Photo/Marta Lavandier)

Rory McIlroy of Northern Ireland hits from the rough on the eighth green during the first round of the Cognizant Classic golf tournament, Thursday, Feb. 29, 2024, in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. (AP Photo/Marta Lavandier)

Chris Kirk hits from the ninth tee during the first round of the Cognizant Classic golf tournament, Thursday, Feb. 29, 2024, in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. (AP Photo/Marta Lavandier)

Shane Lowry of Ireland reacts to his shot from the sixth tee during the first round of the Cognizant Classic golf tournament, Thursday, Feb. 29, 2024, in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. (AP Photo/Marta Lavandier)

Rory McIlroy of Northern Ireland putts on the seventh green during the first round of the Cognizant Classic golf tournament, Thursday, Feb. 29, 2024, in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. (AP Photo/Marta Lavandier)

Sandhill cranes walk near the fifth green during the first round of the Cognizant Classic golf tournament, Thursday, Feb. 29, 2024, in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. (AP Photo/Marta Lavandier)

Chris Kirk hits from the eighth tee during the first round of the Cognizant Classic golf tournament, Thursday, Feb. 29, 2024, in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. (AP Photo/Marta Lavandier)

Rory McIlroy of Northern Ireland shows his ball after making a birdie putt on the seventh hole during the first round of the Cognizant Classic golf tournament, Thursday, Feb. 29, 2024, in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. (AP Photo/Marta Lavandier)

Camilo Villegas of Colombia hits from the sixth tee during the first round of the Cognizant Classic golf tournament, Thursday, Feb. 29, 2024, in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. (AP Photo/Marta Lavandier)

  • Copy Link copied

PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. (AP) — Chad Ramey’s first two trips to PGA National as a professional were largely forgettable. He might have a chance to change that this week.

Ramey shot a bogey-free round of 7-under 64 on Thursday in the opening round of the Cognizant Classic in the Palm Beaches, tying S.H. Kim for the 18-hole lead. Kim had an eagle and five birdies, including one on the finishing hole, to pull into the tie atop the leaderboard.

A group of five players — Cameron Young, Ryan Moore, Chesson Hadley, Austin Eckroat and Andrew Novak — all played in the morning wave and finished one stroke back with 6-under rounds of 65. Also at 65: David Skinns, who played in the afternoon and missed a 11-foot birdie putt on his final hole that would have given him a share of the lead.

Ramey’s past appearances in the event — then known as the Honda Classic — were quick and unremarkable. He missed the cut at PGA National by 10 shots in 2022, missed it by just one stroke last year and failed to shoot a round in the 60s either time. But conditions were perfect when he teed off early Thursday; a course known to often have whipping winds had barely a breeze for much of his round.

“I got a good break this morning with there not being any wind,” Ramey said. “I fully expect the rest of the week the wind to blow. I’ve never been here and it not blow. But to take advantage of the calm conditions is definitely a plus.”

Austin Eckroat hits from the seventh tee during the final round of the Cognizant Classic golf tournament, Sunday, March 3, 2024, in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. (AP Photo/Marta Lavandier)

Added Rory McIlroy, the world’s No. 2-ranked player who shot a 4-under 67 in the morning wave: “You’re not going to get this course much easier.”

Ramey made a 27-foot birdie putt on the opening hole, starting a stretch where he had five birdies in his opening seven holes — including on the 479-yard, par-4 sixth, one of PGA National’s tougher holes. From there, he mostly just stayed out of trouble; only two of his 11 par putts were from outside of 4 feet.

“Hit it well, putted well, chipped in once,” said Ramey, whose last first-round lead came last year at The Players Championship. “Very solid through the whole bag.”

Kim — a South Korean who shot a 58 on the Japan Golf Tour in 2021 — holed out from 25 yards on the par-5 third to highlight his round. He holds a first-round lead for the first time in his 45 PGA Tour starts.

Hadley was also bogey-free, with six birdies on his card as he finished one shot back of Ramey. Moore holed out from 113 yards for eagle at the par-4 13th, highlighting his 65. Eckroat had five consecutive birdies in one stretch; he and Moore had nine birdies and three bogeys on the day.

Hadley said the combination of minimal wind and receptive greens left him thinking “let’s go.”

“I was able to take advantage of the conditions today and shoot 6 under. It probably will continue to go a little bit lower, but it’ll show its teeth. It always does,” Hadley said. “Typically if you’re just hanging around on Sunday, you can put together something, and it can be a special weekend.”

Billy Horschel, C.T. Pan, Sam Ryder, Bud Cauley, Erik van Rooyen, Kevin Yu and Chandler Phillips were in a group at 5-under 66. McIlroy, defending champion Chris Kirk and FedExCup points leader Matthieu Pavon were among those who finished with 67s on a day where PGA National was far from its toughest.

“This felt pretty tame, to be honest,” said Daniel Berger, who finished with a 3-under 68. “I’ve played here where 2-under par is tied for fourth place. Obviously, the golf course has changed a little. It’s a little easier right now. But I expect as the week goes on to get a little tougher as the greens get firmer.”

Play was suspended for darkness with two groups unable to finish their final hole. They will complete their opening rounds early Friday.

AP golf: https://apnews.com/hub/golf

bogey a hole

  • LPGA Newsletters
  • LPGA Travel
  • Women's Network
  • LPGA Professionals
  • Members Only
  • Lesson Zone
  • Membership Information
  • Find A Teacher
  • Professionals Job Board
  • Events Calendar
  • LPGA Amateurs
  • Become A Member
  • Member Login
  • LPGA Foundation
  • LEADERBOARD
  • Changing The Face of Golf
  • Diversity Policy
  • Diverse Supplier Opportunity
  • Celebrating the Green
  • All Access Series
  • Instruction
  • Live Stream
  • Award Winners
  • Hall of Fame
  • ROLEX FIRST TIME WINNERS
  • ROLEX ANNIKA MAJOR AWARD
  • 2024 Player Priority List (PDF)
  • TOURNAMENTS
  • Download Schedule
  • Completed Tournaments
  • Drive On Championship
  • International Crown
  • Solheim Cup
  • CME Group Tour Championship
  • LPGA Local Qualifying Rounds
  • Hilton Grand Vacations TOC
  • Diamond Resorts Tournament of Champions Presented by IOA
  • LPGA Senior Championship
  • RACE TO CME GLOBE
  • Season Standings
  • Past Winners
  • Explanation and Points Breakdown
  • Projected Points Standing
  • CME Group Cares Challenge - Score 1 for St. Jude
  • Aon Risk Reward Challenge
  • KPMG Performance Insights

Green Earns Fourth Victory at HSBC Women’s World Championship

Field for the chevron championship taking shape as lpga tour finishes asian swing.

  • Hannah Green
  • hsbc-womens-world-championship
  • Tournament News

Hannah Green

In an exciting day of golf in Singapore, Aussie Hannah Green was victorious and won the 16th edition of the HSBC Women’s World Championship. The now four-time LPGA Tour winner made a 27-foot putt on her final hole to slide one stroke ahead of Frenchwoman Celine Boutier.

The champion had a steady start to her round, making four pars out of the gate. Her first birdie of the round came on the par-5 5th hole, and a second birdie came on the par-4, No. 9. With her birdie on the 9th, she made the turn at 10-under par. Green’s tract to first place was slowed with a bogey on the 10th hole, but she quickly made up for it with a birdie on hole 12. She turned silent on the next three holes, making pars from Nos. 13 to 15. To earn the title by one shot, Green made a lunge up to the top of the leaderboard, birdieing each of her last three holes to become the winner of the 2024 HSBC Women’s World Championship.

“I didn't hole many putts from long range today until obviously the last couple holes. But I made a really good birdie on 16 and was able to 2-putt there. Kind of gave the first putt a little too much and then made a 5-footer for birdie. That was nice. I could then see the leaderboard on 17, and made a putt there,” said Green, who now joins Karrie Webb as the second Aussie to win the event. “I knew I needed to at least birdie the last to win by one. So as soon as that putt went in, I was like, oh, my God, I've won.”

The runner-up, Boutier made a birdie on the first hole of the day, before making a string of pars on the front nine. She picked up another birdie on No. 8 and made the turn at nine-under par for the tournament. She proceeded to pick up two birdies in her next three holes on the back nine. To reach 12-under par, she made a final birdie on the par-3 15th hole and parred her last three holes of the event. One group ahead of Green, Furue and Lee, Boutier signed her scorecard and turned to the practice putting green, currently tied for the lead with Green who was coming up the 18th. Should Green had not drained her last putt, the duo would have headed to a playoff with the history that neither had lost a playoff on the LPGA Tour.

” I actually, yeah, it (the ending of today’s round) kind of reminded me a little bit (of the Maybank Championship), here again in another playoff. But I think it was really good for me to be in that position after today, starting the round, I didn't even know if I had a shot,” said Boutier, who survived a nine-hole playoff in her last win, the 2023 Maybank Championship. “So I was just trying to put myself up there, and it was great to even have a thought of making it a playoff.”

Four players finished in a tie for third place after the final round on Sunday. Yuna Nishimura tied for the lowest final round, making six birdies that included a streak from holes 4 to 6 and back-to-back birdies on Nos. 13 and 14. Mi Hyang Lee shot a final-round 67 that included an eagle, birdie, bogey finish to move from a tie in 12th to within the top five. Lee’s finish at the 2024 HSBC Women’s World Championship is her best finish on the LPGA Tour since the 2019 Chevron Championship. With their finishes this week, both Nishimura and Lee claimed their first top-10 finishes of the 2024 LPGA Tour season.

Canadian Brooke Henderson and six-time LPGA Tour winner Nasa Hataoka also tied for third place. Henderson, earning her third top-10 finish in her first four starts of the 2024 season, shot a final-round 68 that included birdies on three of her last four holes. This is now her fifth time placing in the top-10 at the HSBC Women’s World Championship. Hataoka earned her second top-10 finish of the 2024 LPGA Tour season, shooting a bogey-free 69 in her last round. The LPGA Tour’s next stop is the Blue Bay LPGA for the fifth event of the 2024 season.

Related Articles

bogey a hole

Five Things to Know About the Blue Bay LPGA

bogey a hole

How to Watch: 2024 Blue Bay LPGA

bogey a hole

LPGA Founder Helen Hicks was America’s Female Professional Golfer

acer logo

  • Charitable Solicitation Disclosures
  • Corporate Sponsors
  • LPGA History
  • LPGA International
  • Sponsorship Opportunities
  • Legends of the LPGA

Fan Feature

  • LPGA Women's Network
  • ADA Act Request
  • Anti-Doping Information
  • Feedback Form
  • Gender Policy
  • Integrity Program Information
  • Media - Press Site
  • Player Login
  • Privacy Policy
  • Professionals Member Login
  • Terms and Conditions
  • Ticket Terms and Conditions

Global Tour

  • International TV Distribution

Mobile Apps

  • Android App
  • Top Stories

bogey a hole

Hannah Green won the 16th edition of the HSBC Women’s World Championship. The now four-time LPGA Tour winner made a 27-foot putt on her final hole to slide one stroke ahead of Frenchwoman Celine Boutier.

goodr logo

Cognizant Classic in The Palm Beaches

PGA National (Champion Course)

HOW DOES YOUR GAME COMPARE TO OTHERS?

bogey a hole

HOW DOES YOUR GAME COMPARE?

bogey a hole

Splish splash

Watch Rory McIlroy suffer a triple-bogey water disaster at 'The Bear Trap'

2053858353

Rory McIlroy attempts a shot from the water during Saturday's third round of the Cognizant Classic.

Brennan Asplen

The three-hole stretch of PGA National is called “The Bear Trap” for good reason. With water, water everywhere, the 15th, 16th and 17th holes are among the toughest gauntlets anywhere on the PGA Tour.

The 434-yard, par-4 16th, with wet stuff entirely down the right side, generally plays the easiest of the three, and this week it’s been only the seventh-hardest hole in the Cognizant Classic. Yet if Rory McIlroy doesn’t lift the trophy on Sunday—and that’s a long shot now—he’s going to rue his third-round splashing around for a triple bogey at the 16th.

MORE: Tiger Woods is set to play in the star-studded Seminole Pro-Member

Standing in the fairway only four shots off the lead and looking to further rally, McIlroy pushed his second shot from the fairway and watched as his ball hit the bank right of the green and bound into the edge of the water.

He had a tough lie. The ball was submerged a few inches under the water and McIlroy thought he could manage a shot, so he removed his right shoe and sock, and rolled up his cream-colored pants. NBC commentator Luke Donald—McIlroy’s most recent Ryder Cup captain­—pointed out that the Ulsterman could take a drop on the bank and try to salvage an up-and-down for bogey. McIlroy decided to go for it. But he swung too far behind the ball, and the splash barely popped it up, only for the ball to roll back into the water.

Now, McIlroy chose to drop the ball on the bank where it originally hit on his approach, and when he pitched to six feet, he had a chance to save a double. But the putt scooted by the cup, and McIlroy suffered a triple-bogey 7—a disastrous result for the World No. 2 who's seeking his first PGA Tour win since last July's Genesis Scottish Open. He captured the DP World Tour's Dubai Desert Classic.

McIlroy bounced back a bit with a birdie at the 18th, but he finished with a one-over-par 72, and at seven under, he’s six shots back of a trio of leaders.

McIlroy's game has been a picture of wild contrasts this week. He's been a beast off the tee, ranking first in strokes gained in the category, as well as in driving distance (322.10 yards). But beyond some wayward approaches, McIlroy has really struggled on the greens, losing 1.59 strokes to the field in putting, ranking hin 62nd.

More from Golf Digest

Trending now.

  • CBSSports.com
  • Fanatics Sportsbook
  • CBS Sports Home
  • Champions League
  • Motor Sports
  • High School
  • Horse Racing 

bracket-games.jpg

Bracket Games

fantasybaseball-180x100.png

Fantasy Baseball

Fantasy football, football pick'em, college pick'em, fantasy basketball, fantasy hockey, franchise games, 24/7 sports news network.

cbs-sports-hq-watch-dropdown.jpg

  • CBS Sports Golazo Network
  • PGA Tour on CBS
  • College Basketball on CBS
  • UEFA Champions League
  • UEFA Europa League
  • Italian Serie A
  • Watch CBS Sports Network
  • TV Shows & Listings

The Early Edge

201120-early-edge-logo-square.jpg

A Daily SportsLine Betting Podcast

With the First Pick

wtfp-logo-01.png

NFL Draft is coming up!

  • Podcasts Home
  • Eye On College Basketball
  • The First Cut Golf
  • NFL Pick Six
  • Cover 3 College Football
  • Fantasy Football Today
  • Morning Kombat
  • My Teams Organize / See All Teams Help Account Settings Log Out

2024 Cognizant Classic leaderboard, grades: Austin Eckroat claims first career win on tour at PGA National

Eckroat made timely birdies on the back nine at pga national to emerge from the pack.

austin-eckroat-2024-cognizant-final-round-g.jpg

Austin Eckroat pulled away from a crowded leaderboard in the final round of the 2024 Cognizant Classic to secure his first career victory on the PGA Tour. Getting to 17 under, the Oklahoma State product clipped Min Woo Lee and Erik Van Rooyen by three strokes and ultimately cruised to the finish line at treacherous PGA National on Monday morning.

With his win, Eckroat has secured playing privileges on the PGA Tour for the next two years and access to signature events for the remainder of 2024. He also receives an invitation to the 2024 Masters for the first time in his career and will tee it up at Augusta National next month in what will be only his third major championship appearance. In his last major start, Eckroat claimed a top 10 at the 2023 U.S. Open.

The 25-year-old began the round in a share of the lead with Shane Lowry and David Skinns and utilized two birdies in his first seven holes to grab the lead before play was suspended due to darkness Sunday. He led Van Rooyen, who was done with his tournament, by a stroke when play resumed Monday morning.

Four straight pars — including one on the accessible par-5 10th — injected some life into the tournament. Van Rooyen still had an outside chance for a playoff, but it was Lee who emerged as Eckroat's greatest threat. 

The charismatic Australian added a birdie on No. 9 before the big bird landed on the 10th. Another birdie from the blade of Lee came on the 12th and finalized a four-hole stretch in which he played 4 under. Lee climbed within one of Eckroat who was stuck in neutral before his iron play heated up.

The leader is dialed 🎯 Austin Eckroat knocks one in close on No. 12. pic.twitter.com/NsBpOGY1Fo — PGA TOUR (@PGATOUR) March 4, 2024

Eckroat's midiron approach from 175 yards on the par-4 12th gave way to the leader's first birdie of the day and third of his final round. Another came on the short 13th and ballooned his lead to three in a short 30-minute window. 

A successful trip around the Bear Trap featured a birdie plus a couple pars and put this tournament on ice. Eckroat's reward was a stress-free walk up the somewhat stressful par-5 18th and a brand-new trophy to put on his mantle. Grade: A+

Here is a breakdown for the rest of the leaderboard at the 2024 Cognizant Classic

T2. Min Woo Lee (-14): One wouldn't necessarily think Lee would thrive on Florida golf courses given the penal nature for wayward misses, but he continues to defy conventional wisdom. The Australian was a monster from tee to green on the week and followed up an eight-birdie performance Saturday with five birdies and an eagle in his final round. His mistakes ultimately added up, but this is a really nice finish for a really good player who struggled relative to expectations on the West Coast. Lee plays great in big-time events and should be licking his chops for the Players Championship where American fans were introduced to him a season ago. Grade: A

Chasing down the lead. @MinWoo27Lee makes eagle on the par-5 10th. He's two shots back. pic.twitter.com/m6bxtH2mO1 — PGA TOUR (@PGATOUR) March 4, 2024

T4. Cameron Young (-13): Rounds of 65 and 66 sandwiched a couple mediocre rounds for the former PGA Tour Rookie of the Year. Young struck the ball nicely all week, but the biggest call for optimism comes on the greens as he gained strokes putting for the third straight tournament. The uptick with the putter has led to quality results with a top 10 at the WM Phoenix Open, top 20 at the Genesis Invitational and now this top-five finish. If that club continues to cooperate for Young, he should continue to knock on the door of that first career win and maybe even knock it down at this week's Arnold Palmer Invitational. Grade: A-

T4. Shane Lowry (-13): The Irishman was the big name out of the trio of 54-hole leaders, but he did not play like it. Lowry struggled in the final round after three days of brilliant iron play and became a bit of a non-factor down the stretch Monday with three bogeys across his first 11 holes and a double bogey on the 15th. It represents another close call at PGA National for Lowry who has now played in one of the final two groups in the final round three straight years. He remains winless in the United States since the 2015 WGC Bridgestone Invitational which is baffling. Grade: B+

T21. Rory McIlroy (-10): McIlroy stood on the 15th tee Saturday at 10 under and ultimately finished the week at that very number. The main culprit came in the form of a seven on the par-4 16th marking McIlroy's third straight tournament with a triple bogey on his scorecard. The rest of the tournament was very solid as he drove the ball like a stallion and led the field in strokes gained off the tee. His iron play and putting left a little to be desired, but it is clear he is ramping up for these next two weeks and one in particular in April. Once he gets the big scores out of his system, McIlroy should start contending again. Grade: C+

"A week that could have been," McIlroy said. "I felt like most of my play was a bit better than what the result suggested. That bad hole on 16 yesterday, a few sloppy mistakes here and there. Overall the game seems to be trending in the right direction. I drove the ball great again this week. I led the field in strokes gained off the tee at Riv. Probably going to do that again this week. That's the foundation of my game. When that's good, I just need some of the rest of the pieces to fall into play. Hopefully they can over the next couple weeks."

T41. Rickie Fowler (-7): The transition to Florida could not have come at a better time for Fowler. He came into this week ranked 174 out of 188 players in total strokes gained on the season and has generally struggled since his win last summer in Detroit. Fowler got caught in the bad end of the weather draw but battled tough and signed for back-to-back 67s in the middle rounds. This came courtesy of some solid tee-to-green play and may propel him into a decent Florida swing before his return to the Masters. Grade: C-

Our Latest Golf Stories

koepka-file-friday.jpg

2024 Arnold Palmer Invitational odds, picks, best bets

Cbs sports staff • 4 min read.

Los Angeles Lakers v Toronto Raptors

LeBron James, Drake invest in PGA Tour

Kyle porter • 2 min read.

koepka.jpg

2024 Arnold Palmer Invitational One and Done picks

2024 masters odds, computer picks, bets, field.

austin-eckroat-final-round-cognizant-2024-g.jpg

Cognizant Classic to finish Monday with Eckroat leading

Patrick mcdonald • 2 min read.

LIV Golf Invitational - Jeddah - Day Three

Niemann wins LIV Jeddah, Kim 33 off lead

Kyle porter • 3 min read.

bogey a hole

Cognizant Classic: Eckroat earns first PGA Tour win

bogey a hole

Niemann takes the win at LIV Jeddah

bogey a hole

Rahm vaults into power rankings

bogey a hole

Report: LeBron James, Drake invest in PGA Tour

bogey a hole

Masters picks: Key stat from seven of last nine winners

bogey a hole

Rahm says he has not heard from Tiger since move to LIV

bogey a hole

Gooch says career slam for Rory would need asterisk

bogey a hole

LOOK: Kim practices on LIV range ahead of return

bogey a hole

Davis Love III enthused about golf's young stars

bogey a hole

Johnny Damon: How I started loving golf

IMAGES

  1. Few Birdies, but One Double Bogey, on the Shortest-Ever U.S. Open Hole

    bogey a hole

  2. Bogey Hole, Newcastle: History of an ocean pool and visiting it

    bogey a hole

  3. Bogey Hole

    bogey a hole

  4. The photos illustrating how the country marked Australia Day 2020

    bogey a hole

  5. First Light Bogey Hole Sunrise Photo Newcastle Images

    bogey a hole

  6. Bogey Hole Newcastle High Resolution Stock Photography

    bogey a hole

COMMENTS

  1. Golf Scoring Terms (Par, Bogey, Birdie, Eagle, Albatross, and More)

    Bogey - A "Bogey" is when a golfer scores one stroke OVER par. Ex: 5 strokes on a par-4 hole. While a bogey is a bad result for a low handicap or professional golfer, new and less skilled golfers are often fine with only needing one more stroke than par to complete a hole. If you got a bogey on every hole of a par-72 course, you'd shoot a 90.

  2. Golf Score Terms: Birdies, Bogeys, Pars, More Meanings

    A birdie is a score of 1-under par on a hole (for example, scoring 4 on a par-5). A bogey is 1-over par on a hole. An eagle is 2-under par on a hole. A double bogey is 2-over par on a hole. A double eagle (very rare) is 3-under par (also called an "albatross"). A triple bogey is 3-over par.

  3. Par, Bogey, Birdie, Eagle, Albatross

    Bogey "Bogey" was the first stroke system, developed in England at the end of the 19th Century. The full history is given in Robert Browning's History of Golf 1955.. In 1890 Mr Hugh Rotherham Secretary of the Coventry Golf Club conceived the idea of standardising the number of shots at each hole that a good golfer should take, which he called the 'ground score.'

  4. Golf Terms: What is a Bogey in Golf?

    Par 4 hole - On a par 4, a bogey is equal to five strokes. Par 3 hole - On a par 3, a bogey is equal to four strokes. Origin of the term "bogey" The emergence of the term "bogey" in golf has a fascinating backstory, rooted in military and colloquial language. Its beginnings trace back to World War I when British military pilots employed the ...

  5. Bogey Golf: The Ultimate Strategy on How to Play Bogey Golf

    A bogey golf handicap refers to a handicap of 18 for a standard 18-hole course. This is calculated based on the idea that the golfer will make a bogey, or one over par, on each hole. According to the United States Golf Association, a bogey golfer is considered a golfer with a course handicap of 20 on a course of standard difficulty. You usually ...

  6. What is a Bogey in Golf? Golfing Terms Explained for Everyone

    The concept of bogey was invented in 1890 by Mr. Hugh Rotherham, then secretary of the Coventry Golf Club. The idea behind this was to set a standard score for good golfers on every hole. This was called the "ground score". Although the term "par" was also used at the time it referred to the 'perfect' score on a hole.

  7. What Is A Bogey In Golf (And Double Bogey) • Honest Golfers

    A double bogey results from going two pars over the standard par of a hole. If you take two more shots than are standard for a hole, you've made a double bogey. But if you go one over par in two different holes, you've made two bogeys. To make a double bogey, you have to go over par by two shots in the same hole.

  8. What is a "Bogey" in Golf? Scoring Terms Explained

    The first round that you average scoring just one over par is also a huge milestone. In golf, "Bogey" is a scoring term meaning a golfer made a score of one stroke over par on a particular hole. Examples of Bogeys include 4 strokes on a par-3 hole, 5 strokes on a par-4 hole, and 6 strokes on a par-5 hole.

  9. What Is A Bogey In Golf?

    A bogey is where a player takes one more shot than the par of the hole. So if a player is playing a par-3 and they make a four, or they are playing a par-4 and make five, it is a bogey. Moreover, there are other variations of a bogey. For example, a double bogey is where you make two shots more than the par of the hole, and a triple bogey is ...

  10. Golf Scoring Term: Par, Bogey, Birdie, Eagle and More

    The par for each hole can vary, but a standard round of golf usually has a par of 72 (which means 18 holes with a par 4). Bogey: A bogey is a single stroke above par. So if a golfer takes 5 shots to get their ball into the hole on a par 4, they have scored a bogey.

  11. Ultimate guide to common golf terms for beginner golfers

    If a player needs one stroke more than par to finish a hole, he makes a "bogey." So, if you finish a par 4 with only 3 strokes, you make a "birdie", but if you take 5 strokes to complete a ...

  12. Golf Scoring Terms (Par, Bogey, Eagle, Birdie, Albatross, and More)

    A Bogey occurs when a golfer completes a hole in one stroke over par. It's a minor setback, a stumble on the path to perfection. While not a disastrous outcome, it signifies room for improvement. Double Bogey, Triple Bogey, Quadruple Bogey: Escalating Challenges.

  13. The Bogey in Golf Definition and Examples of Scores

    Here are the bogey scores for each respective par: A score of 4 on a par-3 hole is a bogey; A score of 5 on a par-4 hole is a bogey; A score of 6 on a par-5 hole is a bogey. Par-6 holes are uncommon, but golfers do occasionally encounter them. A bogey on a par-6 hole means the golfer used 7 strokes to play that hole.

  14. All Golf Scoring Terms Defined

    A bogey is represented on a scoreboard with a square around the score. Double Bogey. A double bogey is a score of 2 more than par on a hole. Examples: 5 strokes on a par 3 6 strokes on a par 4 7 strokes on a par 5. Triple Bogey. You guessed it! A triple bogey is a score of 3 more than par on a hole. Examples: 6 strokes on a par 3 7 strokes on a ...

  15. Why Is a Bogey Called a Bogey in Golf?

    At first, the term "bogey" was used to describe the ideal score on a hole or a full round. By the early 1910s, "par" took over as the term used for the expected score on a hole, and "bogey" was eventually repurposed to mean a score of 1 over par.

  16. Bogey Golf

    Bogey is a golf term that means a golfer has scored one over par on a particular hole, whereas bogey golf is a scoring system that combines elements of stroke play and match play. Examples of bogeys include: Four strokes on a par-3 hole. Five strokes on a par-4 hole. Six strokes on a par-5 holes.

  17. Bogey Hole

    The Bogey Hole, also known as the Commandant's Baths, is a heritage-listed sea bath in Newcastle in New South Wales, Australia. It is thought to be the oldest surviving European construction in the city area. The pool was hewn from a sandstone/conglomerate rock shelf at the base of cliffs near Shepherds Hill.

  18. Bogey Definition & Meaning

    The meaning of BOGEY is specter, phantom. How to use bogey in a sentence.

  19. The Shocking Truth About Bogey Golfers: What You Need to Know

    The average score for a bogey golfer is typically around 90 strokes for 18 holes of golf. This is based on the assumption that a bogey golfer scores one stroke over par on each hole, and there are 18 holes in a round of golf. However, this can vary depending on the player's skill level and the difficulty of the course.

  20. Golf Scoring Terms and Meanings for Dummies

    One stroke on a par-3 hole. This is normally called a hole in one and is extremely rare! Pretty much a miracle golf shot. Two strokes on a par-4 hole is an eagle. Usually a result of a holed approach shot or chip in. In golf terms this is still pretty rare but can happen on shorter holes. Three strokes on a par-5 hole is an eagle.

  21. What Are Bogey Competitions In Golf?

    In bogey competitions a player takes on the course itself in matchplay. The course scores bogey on each hole - bogey here is defined as in the original meaning of that word, the score that a good player should be expected to make on that hole. All 18 holes are played and the player's score is the nett number of holes won (so, the nett score ...

  22. What Is a Double Bogey in Golf?

    A golfer makes a "double bogey" when he or she needs two strokes more than par to complete the play of a hole. A golfer whose average score per hole is a double bogey will average 36-over par (two-over per hole times 18 holes) for his rounds, or roughly in the upper 90s to low 100s in score. Most recreational golfers score in that range (or ...

  23. Golf Scorecard Symbols: How to Decipher the Shapes

    A square isn't the end of the world and very common for the everyday golfer as it constitutes a bogey on the hole. For example, if your final score on the hole is five on a par 4, your score would receive a square. If you're a "bogey golfer" then you would typically have close to 18 squares during the round. But you could also have a ...

  24. Princeton grad Evan Harmeling among Puerto Rico Open's Monday

    Notes: Began his qualifying round with eight birdies and eight pars, then suffered a triple bogey at his 17th hole, the par-4 eighth at Wellington National. Closed with a par to earn a spot in 4 ...

  25. Yes, this Tour pro 6-putted (!) a hole in shocking meltdown: WATCH

    — Detry took five steps to the right of the hole, stood just on his right foot and hit putt three, his bogey attempt. It lipped out on the right side of the cup and finished about a foot away.

  26. Ramey, Kim each shoot bogey-free 64s at PGA National, grab early lead

    Ramey shot a bogey-free round of 7-under 64 on Thursday in the opening round of the Cognizant Classic in the Palm Beaches, tying S.H. Kim for the 18-hole lead. Kim had an eagle and five birdies, including one on the finishing hole, to pull into the tie atop the leaderboard.

  27. Green Earns Fourth Victory at HSBC Women's World Championship

    With her birdie on the 9th, she made the turn at 10-under par. Green's tract to first place was slowed with a bogey on the 10th hole, but she quickly made up for it with a birdie on hole 12. She ...

  28. Watch Rory McIlroy suffer a triple-bogey water disaster at 'The Bear

    The three-hole stretch of PGA National is called "The Bear Trap" for good reason. With water, water everywhere, the 15th, 16th and 17th holes are among the toughest gauntlets anywhere on the ...

  29. 2024 Cognizant Classic leaderboard, grades: Austin Eckroat claims first

    Lowry struggled in the final round after three days of brilliant iron play and became a bit of a non-factor down the stretch Monday with three bogeys across his first 11 holes and a double bogey ...