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Make some ghost bubbles.

If you want to make any day better, perhaps the easiest way is to add bubbles to it. We have seen lots of different kinds of bubbles: big bubbles, small bubbles, bubbles that don’t pop, even colored bubbles. But my personal favorite is Ghost Bubbles. They’re not that hard to make and they are great fun to explore…especially at Halloween:

ghost_bubbles_supplies-300x296

You will need

  • A large plastic container with a wide mouth
  • A rubber sink sprayer designed to attach to a faucet with the sprayer cut off/removed.
  • (regular wide tubing, 1 cm or wider will work as well)
  • Small bowl of bubble solution. CLICK HERE for a recipe.
  • Dry Ice – Available at some grocery stores and ice suppliers
  • A glove made of fuzzy fibers.

ghost_bubble_mist-300x174

CAUTION!: NEVER touch dry ice with your bare hands. Always wear thick gloves and keep away from children. NEVER place dry ice in a completely enclosed container.

  • Carefully drill a hole towards the top of the container that is just wide enough to fit the tube.
  • Fit the tube into the opening with the wide (faucet end) out as shown in the top picture and secure with tape if needed.
  • Fill the container with warm water about 1/4 full.
  • Drop several pieces of dry ice into the water and cap the container loosely. Dry ice mist should now be coming out of the tube.
  • Dip the end of the tube into the bubble solution and make ghost bubbles! If the mist is coming out too fast, loosen the container cap to adjust the flow.

ghost_bubble_drop-170x300

MORE GHOST BUBBLE FUN:

Try holding Ghost Bubbles with a fuzzy glove such as a wool glove. With some practice, you can toss and bounce the bubble. Allow the bubbles to fall onto a fuzzy surface, such as a towel. Try rolling them around by lifting different ends of the towel. Fuzzy surfaces keep the bubble from easily popping because they spread out the amount of pressure on the surface of the bubble, and keep it from touching a surface that would absorb the moisture and dry out the bubble, causing it to pop.

ghost_bubble-glove-300x245

GHOST BUBBLE INFO:

Every soap bubble is made of a film that has 3 layers: Soap, then Water, then Soap. Because of the way that soap molecules are arranged, and the way they attract and repel from each other and the water, the soap creates bonds that give the water additional strength, and allow them to last much longer. The dry ice mist is a combination of water vapor and carbon dioxide gas from the dry ice. Because carbon dioxide is heavier than air, dry ice mist will always flow downward.

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Ghost bubbles {Halloween science and fun}

Preschool , Kindergarten , 1st Grade , 2nd Grade , 3rd Grade , 4th Grade , 5th Grade

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It is not every day that my kids and I do an activity so amazing that I keep saying things like, “Wow!” and “So cool!” and “Holy cow!” over and over. Nonetheless, that is exactly what happened last Halloween when we made these AWESOME ghost bubbles .

What are ghost bubbles? They are opaque bubbles filled with fog rather than air. (The “fog” is actually gaseous carbon dioxide from dry ice.) Ghost bubbles have an ethereal quality to them, and they were loads of fun to make and play with. If you have ever looked for a fun way to add some learning and fun to Halloween, find out how you can make ghost bubbles by reading below!

Note: For more kid-friendly Halloween activities, see my  Halloween activities for Kids  page.

First a note of caution: Dry ice, which is actually frozen carbon dioxide, can be dangerous if not handled properly. Kids should be closely supervised when using dry ice and making ghost bubbles. Click to learn more about handling dry ice safely .

Okay, now that the important safety announcement is out of the way, here are the materials we used to make ghost bubbles:

  • A container large enough to hold a sizeable chunk of dry ice (I used an empty coconut oil jar, but any sizeable glass or plastic container you can fit a funnel over should work)
  • A funnel (must be large enough to fit over the opening of your large container)
  • About 2 feet of flexible plastic or rubber tubing that fits snugly on the end of the funnel (you can pick this up at your local hardware store)
  • A small plastic cup with a hole cut in the end (the other end of the plastic tubing goes here)
  • A small container filled with bubble solution, must be larger than the small plastic cup you are using
  • Dry ice (check with your local grocery store or fish market around Halloween)
  • Optional: Towels to keep your work surface clean, and also allows you to set the bubbles down without them popping
  • Optional: Gloves for kids’ hands (we just used socks pulled over their hands), which allows them to hold the bubbles without popping them

The first thing I did was to drop a chunk of dry ice into our large, glass container. It immediately began producing “fog” as the dry ice sublimated (turned from a solid to a gas without passing through the liquid stage). Already this activity was super cool.

Safety note: Once your dry ice is inside the container, you must always maintain an outlet for the air pressure it generates . This means you should never, under any circumstances, put a lid on the jar because it could cause the jar to explode if the pressure builds too high. You will note that when I put a funnel over the jar in the next step below, there was still an outlet for the air pressure to escape (which is actually what “blows” the bubbles).

I then placed the funnel over the opening of the jar. The end of the funnel was connected to one end of a piece of flexible tubing. The other end of the tubing was connected to a small plastic cup. I dipped the open end of the plastic cup into some bubble solution.

As soon as I lifted the cup from the bubble solution, the “fog” from the dry ice began filling up the inside of a bubble! (This “fog” is simply carbon dioxide.)

My kids wanted to hold the bubble. Because bubbles generally pop when they touch human skin, my kids wore  socks gloves on their hands, which allowed them to hold the bubbles for a bit.

When the bubbles did pop, they left a hazy fog behind.  (Ooooh, very ghost like!)

Don’t be alarmed by the next picture – full facial protection is not necessary to make ghost bubbles. My son is only wearing this gear because my kids did this activity in their Halloween costumes. 🙂

It was really fun to watch the bubbles s-t-r-e-t-c-h out of the bubble blower contraption into my kids’ hands.

And my kids loved holding their ghost bubbles and looking at their foggy insides.

We also placed ghost bubbles onto the carpet and a towel. They truly were opaque, unlike regular bubbles which are transparent.

And when they popped, we loved watching the ghost-like fog dissipate.

Once our dry ice had lost most of its power, I grabbed a small piece of dry ice (taking appropriate safety precautions!) and dropped it into a container of bubble solution. The container immediately began to bubble over!

For a great video on ghost bubbles, see this video from Steve Spangler .

More Halloween resources

More Halloween posts from Gift of Curiosity:

  • Books about Halloween
  • Mason jar jack-o-lantern
  • Candy experiments
  • Halloween Montessori activities
  • Toilet paper mummies
  • Pumpkin decomposition experiment
  • Describe a pumpkin using all five senses
  • Jack-o-lantern Printables Pack
  • Halloween Bingo
  • Halloween do-a-dot printables
  • Halloween Sudoku
  • Pumpkin outlines

You can find more Halloween activities and printables on my  Halloween Activities for Kids  page and Halloween Activities for Kids Pinterest board. 

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Fizzy Melting Ghost Science

 We particularly love Halloween science like this fizzy ghost science experiment ! All of our   Halloween science activities have a not too spooky twist to classic science experiments ! Kids love science activities for both the hands-on and visual experience it provides. We love to make things fizz, bubble, erupt, and pop !

FIZZY GHOST SCIENCE HALLOWEEN ACTIVITY!

Baking Soda and Vinegar Science and  Halloween Play

This season we enjoyed some great fizzy Halloween science play ! We love checking out the reaction between the baking soda and vinegar. Each time we repeat this type of experiment we discuss a little more and remember a little bit more too about the science behind it all.   Click here for the science.

Baking Soda

Googley Eyes

Ice Cube Tray

Bowl and Spoon for Mixing

Eyedropper or Baster

GHOST SCIENCE SET UP

To set up this ghost science activity, mix approximately two parts baking soda and one part water to create a firm dough. It should not be watery or runny and almost a bit crumbly but packable/moldable. Fill sections of an ice cube tray, packing tightly. Push in two googley eyes. Place tray in freezer for a couple hours or even make into balls and use right away! Set out vinegar and an eye dropper or baster!

YOU MIGHT ASLO LIKE : Building Ghostly Structures

fizzy ghosts baking soda science bubbling cup

I like freezing the baking soda dough so that it lasts a bit longer! We even tried a frozen fizzing castle . Simple fizzy ghost science is very engaging for the senses! You can feel the fizzing bubbles, see the baking soda reaction, and hear the fizzing of the carbon dioxide gas that is created.

There is so much to learn with this baking soda ghost science activity! I love to use the holidays and seasons for learning themes! It makes it so much fun to repeat science experiments for practice and better understanding! We love baking soda science all year!

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE: Bubbling Ghost Science

The end result of our Halloween ghost science activity, melted ghosts! His finishing touch was to dump the bowl of vinegar into the pan and watch it bubble all the way up to the top. Very cool sensory play! Once the fizzing stop, we counted all the eyes for a simple one to one math counting activity.

Not too creepy and not too spooky but lots of hands-on play and learning with common ingredients!

COOL HALLOWEEN GHOST SCIENCE ACTIVITY!

31 Days of Halloween STEM Countdown

HALLOWEEN STEM 31 Days Countdown

Top 10 Halloween Science Sensory Play And Learning

Top 10 Halloween Science Sensory Activities For Kids

Some of our favorite STEM tools at home! Amazon Affiliate Disclosure: I receive compensation for any items sold through this site. Our ideas are always free to enjoy and try at school or home.

ghost bubbles science experiment

It’ very funny!!!! I’ am a teacher of primari School! Thank you, Sarah

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ghost bubbles science experiment

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COMMENTS

  1. Make Some Ghost Bubbles! - ScienceBob.com

    Dip the end of the tube into the bubble solution and make ghost bubbles! If the mist is coming out too fast, loosen the container cap to adjust the flow. MORE GHOST BUBBLE FUN: Try holding Ghost Bubbles with a fuzzy glove such as a wool glove. With some practice, you can toss and bounce the bubble.

  2. Halloween Bubbles Ghost Activity - Little Bins for Little Hands

    Straws OPTIONAL: eyedropper, apple slicer, and baster for blowing bubbles ( see them in action here) Simple soft glove ( try bouncing bubbles)

  3. How to Make DIY Ghost BUBBLES That Don't Pop! Easy Science ...

    How to Make DIY Ghost BUBBLES That Don't Pop! Easy Science Experiment For Kids! THINGS YOU WILL NEED:Vinyl TubingPlastic JarBarb adapterAluminum PanUtility K...

  4. Ghost bubbles {Halloween science and fun} - Gift of Curiosity

    A small plastic cup with a hole cut in the end (the other end of the plastic tubing goes here) A small container filled with bubble solution, must be larger than the small plastic cup you are using Dry ice (check with your local grocery store or fish market around Halloween)

  5. Ghost Bubbles | At-Home Experiments | Mad Science - YouTube

    Ghost Bubbles | At-Home Experiments | Mad Science MadScienceGroup 3.24K subscribers Subscribe 49 8.8K views 3 years ago Ghost Bubbles HOV046 Try YouTube Kids Learn more Ghost...

  6. Fizzy Melting Ghost Science - Little Bins for Little Hands

    To set up this ghost science activity, mix approximately two parts baking soda and one part water to create a firm dough. It should not be watery or runny and almost a bit crumbly but packable/moldable. Fill sections of an ice cube tray, packing tightly. Push in two googley eyes.

  7. Ghost (DRY ICE) BUBBLES -- Science FUN FOR KIDS! - YouTube

    A cool science experiment using dry ice and bubbles! Together, the dry ice, water, and bubble solution make ghost bubbles that pop and fade away! Ghost bubbl...

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    Osmosis is the movement of water (or some other solvent) across a semi-permeable membrane. By placing gummy bears in different liquids (such as tap water, salt water, vinegar, etc.), you can watch the gummy bears grow (as liquid enters the bears) or shrink (as the bear dehydrates).

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    Ghost Bubbles To make your own Frozen Halloween Bubbles, you will need these Simple Supplies: * plastic tubing * cups or funnels (we've used both...I just happened to take pictures on a cup day last year) * duct tape * 2-liter bottle * dry ice * dry ice tools (we just use a small hammer and big spoon) * water