March 2, 2022 Press Releases

Washington State Legislature Passes HB 1705 To Close Ghost Gun Loophole And HB 1630 To Reject Armed Intimidation

Alliance for Gun Responsibility applauds this vital progress to address growing gun violence threats 

OLYMPIA, WA – Today, the Washington State Senate approved two vital gun responsibility bills, HB 1705 to prohibit ghost guns and HB 1630 to restrict firearms at public meetings and election-related locations. HB 1705 , sponsored by Rep. Liz Berry (D-36), restricts the manufacture, assembly, sale, transfer, purchase, possession, transport, and receipt of ghost guns—untraceable, unserialized firearms and unfinished receivers. It was approved 26-23. HB 1630 , sponsored by Rep. Senn (D-41), prohibits open carry at local government meetings and restricts firearms at school board meetings and election-related offices and facilities.  It was approved 28-20.

“Gun violence is the leading cause of death for children and teens in Washington. As a mother, this is devastating. And as someone who lost my dear friend Gabe to gun violence, this is heartbreaking,” said Rep. Berry. “Gun violence is preventable, and I believe we have the responsibility to do everything we can to save lives. That’s why I am proud to champion this bill that will ban untraceable, homemade ghost guns.”

“This bill will make our local elected officials and all residents who want to make their voices heard at public meetings safer,” said Rep. Senn . “No one should have to experience the threat of gun violence to participate in civic life. Sharing your voice and your opinions, not your guns, is what makes our democracy go round.”

“The passage of HB 1705 and HB 1630 are vital steps toward a safer Washington,” said Renée Hopkins, CEO of the Alliance for Gun Responsibility. “HB 1705 closes a deadly loophole in our state’s background check system to ensure that people who we all agree shouldn’t have easy access to firearms can’t get their hands on one. And HB 1630 rejects armed intimidation and protects our democracy. We are proud that our elected leaders have taken action to build on previous progress and address these alarming and growing gun violence threats.” 

Ghost guns are unserialized and untraceable firearms that anyone—including prohibited purchasers, children, domestic abusers, and gun traffickers—can buy online, at gun shows, or from local dealers. They are often sold through kits including all of the parts, equipment, and instructions necessary to build these weapons at home. Ghost guns are not serialized, making it difficult for law enforcement to trace their origin and easy for gun traffickers to divert them into the criminal market. 

In 2021, the legislature took action to reject armed intimidation by prohibiting open carry at the Capitol, protests, and demonstrations. HB 1630 extends this safeguard by prohibiting open carry at public local government meetings and prohibiting the knowing carry and possession of firearms at school board meetings and election-related offices and facilities. 

You can see the Alliance’s full 2022 Agenda here , and a fact sheet on gun violence in Washington here .

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In 2019 and 2022, Washington enacted some of the nation’s most comprehensive ghost gun legislation, regulating both unserialized and undetectable firearms and limiting the sale, manufacture, distribution, and possession, etc., of unserialized unfinished frames and receivers. 1

Unserialized (“untraceable”) firearms :

Washington’s law defines “Untraceable firearm” to generally mean any unserialized firearm manufactured after July 1, 2019. (The term applies to any firearm that is not an antique firearm and that cannot be traced by law enforcement by means of a serial number affixed to the firearm by a federal firearms manufacturer, importer, or dealer in compliance with federal law). 2

Washington’s laws now make it generally unlawful to:

  • Manufacture, cause to be manufactured, assemble, or cause to be assembled, an unserialized (“untraceable”) firearm. 3
  • Sell, offer to sell, transfer, or purchase an untraceable firearm. 4
  • Knowingly or recklessly allow, facilitate, aid, or abet the manufacture or assembly of an untraceable firearm by a person who is legally ineligible to possess a firearm under state or federal law (or who has signed a valid voluntary waiver of firearm rights ). 5 (For the purposes of this law, a failure to conduct a background check on the purchaser is prima facie evidence of recklessness). 6
  • Beginning March 10, 2023, to knowingly or recklessly possess, transport, or receive an untraceable firearm. 7

Unserialized frames and receivers:

Washington’s law defines “Unfinished frame or receiver” to mean a frame or receiver 8 that is partially complete, 9 disassembled, or inoperable, that: (i) Has reached a stage in manufacture where it may readily be completed, assembled, converted, or restored to a functional state; 10 or (ii) Is marketed or sold to the public to become or be used as the frame or receiver of a functional firearm once finished or completed, including without limitation products marketed or sold to the public as an 80 percent frame or receiver or unfinished frame or receiver. 11

  • Sell, offer to sell, transfer, or purchase an unfinished frame or receiver that has not been imprinted with a serial number issued by a federally licensed firearms importer, manufacturer, or dealer. 12
  • Beginning March 10, 2023, to knowingly or recklessly possess, transport, or receive an unfinished frame or receiver that has not been imprinted with a serial number issued by a federally licensed firearms importer, manufacturer, dealer, or other federal licensee authorized to imprint serial numbers. 13 (These prohibitions are subject to certain exceptions, including transfer of unfinished and unserialized frames or receivers to law enforcement or to federally licensed firearms importers, manufacturers, or dealers). 14

undetectable firearms :

Washington law defines “undetectable firearms” as: “Any firearm that is not as detectable as 3.7 ounces of 17-4 PH stainless steel by walk-through metal detectors or magnetometers commonly used at airports or any firearm where the barrel, the slide or cylinder, or the frame or receiver of the firearm would not generate an image that accurately depicts the shape of the part when examined by the types of X-ray machines commonly used at airports. 15

  • Manufacture, own, buy, sell, loan, furnish, transport, or have in one’s possession or control, an “undetectable firearm” or any part designed and intended solely and exclusively for use in an undetectable firearm. 16
  • Assemble or repair any undetectable firearm. 17
  • Manufacture an untraceable firearm with intent to sell the firearm. 18
  • Knowingly or recklessly allow, facilitate, aid, or abet the manufacture or assembly of an undetectable firearm by a person who is legally ineligible to possess firearms under state or federal law (or who has signed a voluntary firearms waiver). 19

Washington law also declares all illegally held or illegally possessed undetectable firearms to be contraband and states that it is the duty of all peace officers have a duty to seize illegal undetectable firearms wherever found. 20

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Our experts can speak to the full spectrum of gun violence prevention issues. Have a question? Email us at [email protected].

  • 2019 WA HB 1739 and 2021 WA HB 1805. [ ↩ ]
  • Rev. Code Wash. § 9.41.010(41). [ ↩ ]
  • Rev. Code Wash. § 9.41.326(1)(effective Jul. 1, 2022). See also: Rev. Code Wash. § 9.41.190(d) (separately prohibiting the same conduct with higher penalties if the person commits the violation with intent to sell the untraceable firearm). [ ↩ ]
  • Rev. Code Wash. § 9.41.326(3). [ ↩ ]
  • Rev. Code Wash. § 9.41.325. [ ↩ ]
  • Id. [ ↩ ]
  • Rev. Code Wash. § 9.41.326(2). [ ↩ ]
  • The term “Frame or receiver” is defined at Rev. Code Wash. § 9.41.010(16). [ ↩ ]
  • See Rev. Code Wash. § 9.41.010(40)(b)(ii). [ ↩ ]
  • See Rev. Code Wash. § 9.41.010(40)(b)(i)(defining the term “readily” for these purposes. [ ↩ ]
  • Rev. Code Wash. § 9.41.010(39). [ ↩ ]
  • Rev. Code Wash. § 9.41.327(2). [ ↩ ]
  • Rev. Code Wash. § 9.41.327(1), (3). [ ↩ ]
  • Rev. Code Wash. § 9.41.327(1), (2). [ ↩ ]
  • Rev. Code Wash. § 9.41.010(38). [ ↩ ]
  • Rev. Code Wash. § 9.41.190(1)(a). [ ↩ ]
  • Rev. Code Wash. § 9.41.190(1)(b). [ ↩ ]
  • Rev. Code Wash. § 9.41.190(1)(c). [ ↩ ]
  • Wash. Rev. Code Ann. § 9.41.325. [ ↩ ]
  • See Wash. Rev. Code Ann. § 9.41.220. [ ↩ ]

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washington state ghost gun law

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Supreme Court reinstates federal ‘ghost gun’ rule backed by Washington state

The move allows authorities to enforce the regulations while a legal challenge against them continues., by: laurel demkovich - august 8, 2023 5:03 pm.

washington state ghost gun law

(Getty Images)

A Biden administration effort to clamp down on untraceable firearms made from kits can continue for now, after the U.S. Supreme Court weighed in Tuesday.

It’s a small victory for states, including Washington, who say federal inaction has led to more of the “ghost guns” crossing their borders and getting used in crimes.

The Supreme Court voted 5-4 that a Biden administration rule regulating the guns – which can be made at home from parts bought online – can remain in effect while a legal challenge against it moves ahead. 

Attorney General Bob Ferguson joined 21 other attorneys general last month in filing a friend-of-the-court brief in support of the rule, which was issued last year.

Their brief described the rule as “a vital backstop to states’ efforts to stem the flow of ghost guns and combat the violence engendered by prohibited persons possessing untraceable weapons.” 

Ferguson said the Supreme Court temporarily reinstating the rule was “an important legal victory.” 

“We cannot allow untraceable weapons to continue flooding our communities, which makes it much harder for law enforcement to solve crimes and makes it far too easy for felons, domestic abusers, juveniles, and others to illegally acquire deadly weapons,” he added in a statement.

The regulation from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives broadened the agency’s definition of “firearm” under the Gun Control Act of 1968. It was revised to include weapons that “may readily be converted to expel a projectile by the action of an explosive” and “the frame or receiver of any such weapon.” 

Gun owners and opponents of the rule challenged it in court, arguing the regulations were not allowed under the Gun Control Act. 

A federal district court judge in Texas sided with the challengers and blocked the rule earlier this summer . The case is now before a federal appeals court.

Washington is among 13 states with laws to regulate ghost guns, according to Everytown for Gun Safety. 

The Legislature last year passed a bill to prohibit people from making, assembling, selling, purchasing or knowingly or recklessly possessing untraceable firearms. 

According to the law, this includes guns manufactured after July 1, 2019 that are not antique and cannot be traced by law enforcement with a serial number. Hobbyists can still make guns at home if they use parts with serial numbers. 

But even with a state law prohibiting untraceable firearms, the attorneys general who argued for the federal rule said there is only so much individual states can do on the issue.

“There is a natural limit to states’ abilities to combat a nationwide problem that crosses state borders,” their brief read. “Absent federal enforcement, ghost guns have continued to proliferate, including in the very states that have been trying to keep them out.”

Our stories may be republished online or in print under Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-ND 4.0. We ask that you edit only for style or to shorten, provide proper attribution and link to our web site. Please see our republishing guidelines for use of photos and graphics.

Laurel Demkovich

Laurel Demkovich

Laurel joined States Newsroom in 2023 after almost three years as a statehouse reporter for the Spokesman-Review. She covers state government, the Legislature and all other Olympia news.

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New gun restrictions take effect July 1 in Washington

Two new laws aimed at reducing mass shootings and cracking down on the proliferation of so-called “ghost guns” go into effect July 1 in Washington. Majority Democrats in the state Legislature passed the new restrictions earlier this year.

One of the new laws bans the manufacture, import, distribution or sale of a gun magazine that holds more than 10 rounds of ammunition. There are exceptions for the armed forces and law enforcement. Gun owners who already possess higher capacity magazines can keep them. A violation is a gross misdemeanor.

According to the Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence, Washington joins nine other states and the District of Columbia in limiting gun magazine capacity. Backers say the restriction is an effective way to reduce the incidents of mass shootings. Gun rights advocates say the magazine limit is unnecessary and unconstitutional and have filed a lawsuit aimed at overturning the new restriction.

The other new law deals with untraceable firearms, which are guns that don't have serial numbers and therefore can't be traced by law enforcement. In 2019, Washington lawmakers passed a law making it a class C felony to manufacture "ghost guns" with the intent to sell them.

FILE: Kim Gatbunton, center, holds a photo of her son Josh Gatbunton, who was shot and killed during a 2008 robbery at an apartment in Tacoma, Wash., as she talks with reporters along with Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, right, Wednesday, March 23, 2022, at the Capitol in Olympia, Wash., after Inslee signed a package of bills to tighten gun laws in Washington state. Those laws go into effect July 1, 2022.

FILE: Kim Gatbunton, center, holds a photo of her son Josh Gatbunton, who was shot and killed during a 2008 robbery at an apartment in Tacoma, Wash., as she talks with reporters along with Washington Gov. Jay Inslee, right, Wednesday, March 23, 2022, at the Capitol in Olympia, Wash., after Inslee signed a package of bills to tighten gun laws in Washington state. Those laws go into effect July 1, 2022.

Ted S. Warren / AP

Under the new law, that restriction is expanded to prohibit the manufacture, assembly, purchase or sale of an untraceable firearm. A first violation is a civil infraction that comes with a fine of up to $500.

The new law also bans the sale or purchase of an unfinished firearm frame or receiver.

Beginning in March of next year, the law will further expand to ban the possession, transport or receipt of an untraceable firearm. There are exceptions for guns made prior to 1968, guns that are permanently inoperable or guns that have been given a serial number by a federally licensed firearms dealer.

A third new gun law went into effect in early June that expanded the locations where weapons are prohibited or restricted in Washington. Under the new rules, the open carry of weapons is banned in local government buildings — like city halls — where public meetings are held.

Additionally, all firearms or other weapons are banned, even those that are not openly carried, at school board meetings held on school district owned or leased property.

The new law also prohibits weapons at certain election facilities, including ballot counting centers and voter registration officers. There's an exception for concealed pistol permit holders, although that exemption does not apply at ballot counting centers when counting is happening. In those times, weapons are completely banned.

A first violation is a misdemeanor.

Sponsors of the legislation said one of their goals was to address the issue of "armed intimidation" in the public square, especially in light of heated school board meetings and threats of violence surrounding elections.

Last year, legislative Democrats banned the open carry of weapons at the state Capitol and at public demonstrations.

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New gun restrictions take effect July 1 in Washington

A red polymer frame is displayed on a table with pieces of a pistol in front of it. A sign below the display reads "GHOST GUN 'Buy-Build-Shoot' Pistol Kit."

Two new laws aimed at reducing mass shootings and cracking down on the proliferation of so-called "ghost guns" go into effect July 1 in Washington. Majority Democrats in the state Legislature passed the new restrictions earlier this year.

One of the new laws bans the manufacture, import, distribution or sale of a gun magazine that holds more than 10 rounds of ammunition. There are exceptions for the armed forces and law enforcement. Gun owners who already possess higher capacity magazines can keep them. A violation is a gross misdemeanor.

According to the Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence, Washington joins nine other states and the District of Columbia in limiting gun magazine capacity. Backers say the restriction is an effective way to reduce the incidents of mass shootings. Gun rights advocates say the magazine limit is unnecessary and unconstitutional and have filed a lawsuit aimed at overturning the new restriction.

The other new law deals with untraceable firearms, which are guns that don't have serial numbers and therefore can't be traced by law enforcement. In 2019, Washington lawmakers passed a law making it a class C felony to manufacture "ghost guns" with the intent to sell them.

Under the new law, that restriction is expanded to prohibit the manufacture, assembly, purchase or sale of an untraceable firearm. A first violation is a civil infraction that comes with a fine of up to $500.

The new law also bans the sale or purchase of an unfinished firearm frame or receiver.

Beginning in March of next year, the law will further expand to ban the possession, transport or receipt of an untraceable firearm. There are exceptions for guns made prior to 1968, guns that are permanently inoperable or guns that have been given a serial number by a federally licensed firearms dealer.

A third new gun law went into effect in early June that expanded the locations where weapons are prohibited or restricted in Washington. Under the new rules, the open carry of weapons is banned in local government buildings — like city halls — where public meetings are held.

Additionally, all firearms or other weapons are banned, even those that are not openly carried, at school board meetings held on school district owned or leased property.

The new law also prohibits weapons at certain election facilities, including ballot counting centers and voter registration officers. There's an exception for concealed pistol permit holders, although that exemption does not apply at ballot counting centers when counting is happening. In those times, weapons are completely banned.

A first violation is a misdemeanor.

Sponsors of the legislation said one of their goals was to address the issue of "armed intimidation" in the public square, especially in light of heated school board meetings and threats of violence surrounding elections.

Last year, legislative Democrats banned the open carry of weapons at the state Capitol and at public demonstrations.

washington state ghost gun law

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Attorney General Ferguson’s bill to ban 3D-printed “ghost guns” passes Legislature

Bipartisan approval sends the bill to the Governor

OLYMPIA — The Washington Legislature today passed Attorney General Bob Ferguson’s agency request bill prohibiting the manufacture or possession of untraceable, undetectable 3D-printed guns. The bill also prohibits sending a printable gun file to a person who is ineligible to possess firearms. The bill designates undetectable firearms as contraband.

HB 1739 , sponsored by Rep. Javier Valdez, D-Seattle, passed the House on March 4 by a bipartisan vote of 55-41. It passed the Senate on April 16, also with bipartisan support, 30-18, with an amendment. The House agreed to the Senate amendment today by a vote of 56-40. The measure now heads to Gov. Jay Inslee for his signature.

“I support the Second Amendment. However, we cannot allow felons and other dangerous individuals to get around our state’s background check requirements by printing untraceable, undetectable 3D-printed guns,” Ferguson said. “Guns that evade metal detectors pose too great a risk to the safety of our communities.”

“3D printers are becoming more advanced and more available to everyday consumers,” said Rep. Valdez. “These undetectable guns pose enormous threats to public safety. This is one of those issues that requires lawmakers to be proactive before it’s too late.”

Sen. Manka Dhingra, D-Redmond, sponsored a companion bill in the Senate.

“The untraceable and undetectable nature of 3D-printed guns poses a unique danger to all Washingtonians,” said Sen. Dhingra. “I am proud that we are enacting laws that are keeping up with the realities of technology by limiting the creation and distribution of 3D-printed guns. This law will help our state reduce gun trafficking and save lives.”

Several organizations offered key support for the measure, including the Alliance for Gun Responsibility. Other supporters included: Gov. Inslee; Everytown for Gun Safety; Grandmothers Against Gun Violence; Faith Action Network; Foundation for Healthy Generations; the Washington State Medical Association and the Washington Association for Substance Abuse & Violence Prevention.

In 2018, Ferguson sued the Trump Administration over its decision to allow the unlimited distribution of downloadable files for 3D-printed guns. A U.S. District Court judge blocked the Trump Administration’s decision, writing that “the untraceable and undetectable nature of these small firearms … poses a unique danger.” The litigation is ongoing.

In February, a Texas man who was barred by a judge from possessing a firearm was sentenced to eight years in prison for allegedly obtaining parts of an AR-15-style rifle, and then using a 3D printer to manufacture the firing mechanism. According to federal prosecutors, he also had a “hit list” of Democratic and Republican lawmakers titled “9/11/2001 list of American Terrorists” when he was arrested.

The Legislature has passed six of Ferguson’s agency request bills this session, and one has been signed into law by the Governor.

More information about Ferguson’s 2019 agency request legislation is available on the AGO’s legislative information page .

The Office of the Attorney General is the chief legal office for the state of Washington with attorneys and staff in 27 divisions across the state providing legal services to roughly 200 state agencies, boards and commissions. Visit www.atg.wa.gov to learn more.

Brionna Aho, Communications Director, (360) 753-2727; [email protected]

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Ghost gun ban among changes in new Washington state gun laws

Inititative 1639 would create some of the strongest gun regulations in the country

OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — New gun regulations taking effect in Washington state include a ban on undetectable guns made using 3D printers. The Seattle Times  reports  that a law against so-called "ghost guns" takes effect Monday, along with components of a previously instituted law raising the legal purchase age for some guns. A law passed in January raises the purchase age for semi-automatic rifles to 21. Additional clauses taking effect Monday include enhanced background checks for semi-automatic rifle buyers and a safe gun-storage provision. A gun owner could be charged with community endangerment if a firearm is accessed and used by someone who is not allowed to possess it, such as a child or a felon. Gun-rights advocates have filed a legal challenge against the initiative's age restriction for semi-automatic rifles.

Limits on ‘ghost guns,’ including 3D-printed guns, clear Washington Legislature

OLYMPIA — The Washington state Legislature on Tuesday approved new limits on untraceable, undetectable firearms, including the 3D-printed guns at the center of a high-profile federal case.

The proposal would ban outright undetectable guns and would limit — but not ban — untraceable guns.

The Washington proposal follows a prominent 2018 federal case that saw a Texas company, Defense Distributed, blocked from posting free plans online that could be used to print plastic guns on home 3D printers. Law enforcement officials worried such guns could be smuggled into secure areas or printed by felons.

The 2018 order was limited, however, blocking the company from giving the plans away but not from selling them via mail or email, which representatives said the company has continued to do, with thousands of orders.

Washington attorney general Bob Ferguson led the group of 19 states whose legal challenge resulted in the block and also requested Tuesday’s bill.

“We cannot allow felons and other dangerous individuals to get around our state’s background check requirements by printing untraceable, undetectable 3D-printed guns,” Ferguson said in a release.

Undetectable guns are the main focus of the bill, which adds a broad prohibition on any gun that doesn’t have enough metal in it to trigger common airport scanners.

Specifically outlawed would be any firearm that doesn’t contain at least 3.7 ounces of steel, and any gun that wouldn’t show a recognizable outline in an X-ray machine.

That would essentially prohibit printing complete plastic guns on 3D printers, unless metal parts were included.

The bill stops short of banning untraceable guns, defined as guns without a serial number from a federally licensed firearm manufacturer.

Making untraceable guns for personal use is allowed within certain limits under federal law.

That wouldn’t change under the bill, which doesn’t subject untraceable firearms to the same kind of broad prohibition as undetectable guns.

Instead, Ferguson’s bill only prohibits giving manufacturing assistance to anyone prohibited from owning a gun, like a felon, making the first offense a misdemeanor.

Plans for 3D printers would be included in that, and anyone selling them online would have to perform a background check on Washington buyers, according to Ferguson spokeswoman Brionna Aho.

While plans for 3D-printed guns have gained media attention, other untraceable gun kits can be purchased online, including so-called “80 percent” guns, which are sold with basic machining work like drilling left undone to circumvent federal registration requirements, and often come as a kit including instructions for completion.

Republicans were broadly critical of the measure ahead of Tuesday’s vote, including Sen. Keith Wagoner, of Sedro-Woolley, who said the high cost of 3D printers was prohibitive, and questioned whether plastic guns would ever appeal to wrongdoers when manufacturing a metal alternative is possible.

“This is already covered under federal law,” Wagoner said during earlier debate in the Senate. “You can go home in the workshop in a day and make something that really will hurt you.”

After Tuesday’s 56-40 vote, the measure now heads to Gov. Jay Inslee for consideration.

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What Happens if You Get Caught with a Ghost Gun?

Washington imposes several laws in regard to gun ownership. To legally possess a gun in the state, you must undergo a background check and fill out important forms, such as a Federal Firearm Transaction Record . 

However, some people attempt to circumvent these laws by building privately made or homemade firearms, known as “ghost guns”, which are undetectable in state and federal registration systems. If you are caught with a ghost gun in Washington, you could face severe penalties, including fines and jail time.

Ghost Gun Laws in Washington State

Ghost guns, or privately manufactured or homemade guns, are highly illegal in Washington state . According to RCW 9.41.325 , no person may knowingly or recklessly allow, facilitate, or abet the manufacture or assembly of an undetectable firearm. Additionally, it is illegal to create or help someone obtain a ghost gun if any involved party is ineligible to possess a firearm under state or federal law or has signed a voluntary waiver of firearm rights. 

There are certain exceptions to Washington’s unlawful firearms rule, but they are not common. According to RCW 9.41.190 , the following people may carry an untraceable firearm. 

  • Peace officers who are performing their official duties or traveling to and from official duties
  • Members of the armed forces of the United States or the state of Washington, who are performing official duties or traveling on official business
  • Manufacturers of firearms and their employees, as long as they are producing certain types of firearms for lawful police, military, or export purposes

Penalties for Being Caught with a Ghost Gun in Washington

If you are caught with a ghost gun, you could face a gross misdemeanor charge. You could face up to 364 days in jail and up to a $5,000 fine if you are convicted of this crime. Depending on the circumstances surrounding your arrest, you may need to undergo counseling for domestic violence, drugs, or alcohol. 

If you have been found guilty of building or assembling a ghost gun in the past, you could face a class C felony . Under Washington law, people who are convicted of a class C felony will spend up to five years in prison and pay a fine up to $10,000.

What to Do If You Are Arrested for a Homemade Firearm

Being caught with a ghost gun can result in serious, life-altering penalties. If you find yourself being arrested for creating or possessing an unlawful firearm, it is important to remain calm and comply with the officers’ instructions. Remember, you have the right to remain silent—do not answer any questions or offer explanations about the firearm until you speak with a lawyer.

As soon as possible following the arrest, ask to speak with a Washington criminal defense lawyer. Your attorney can evaluate your case, help you understand the charges that you are facing, and advocate aggressively for your side of the story. He or she can also advise you on how to approach your case and speak with police officers and investigators.

Without a firearm attorney, you may find yourself struggling to navigate Washington’s criminal justice process. With a lawyer on your side, you can fight for the best possible outcome in your case. After your arrest, contact the Law Office Of Mark Treyz to discuss your legal options.

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2023 Brings New Firearms Legislation to Washington State

October 16, 2023  by  Flannary Collins Category:  New Legislation and Regulations ,  Firearms

A form for purchasing a gun

The Washington State Legislature (Legislature) passed several firearms-related bills during the 2023 legislative session, all of which local governments should familiarize themselves with. While these new firearms regulations don’t require any action by local government legislative bodies due to state preemption of firearm regulation, they do add to a growing list of firearm regulations adopted in response to the increased number of firearms shootings in Washington State and around the country. Local law enforcement agencies in particular may be interested in changing requirements for background checks and sharing of sealed juvenile records.

Bans on Assault Weapons and High-Capacity Magazines

On April 25, 2023, Governor Inslee signed into law HB 1240 , a ban on the manufacture, import, distribution, sale, or offer of sale of any assault weapon.

Law enforcement agencies are still authorized to purchase assault weapons from dealers and manufacturers. The law doesn’t appear to address whether a law enforcement agency can surplus assault weapons to another law enforcement agency, so that remains an unresolved issue.  Finally, the law doesn’t apply to those who inherit an assault weapon, nor does it impact possession of an assault weapon.

The 2023 assault weapons ban has withstood recent legal challenges and, on a related matter, a U.S. District Court judge in the Eastern District of Washington recently upheld as constitutional the state’s ban on the sale, manufacture, and distribution of high-capacity magazines, which was previously adopted in 2022.

Background Checks and Other Firearm Sale and Ownership Requirements

Effective January 1, 2024, HB 1143 imposes additional requirements for the sale and transfer of firearms, including the following provisions:

  • Background checks are required for all firearm sales and transfers, with some limited exceptions including sales or transfers to law enforcement agencies and officers acting within the course and scope of their employment or official duties ( RCW 9.41.113 ). Background checks are to be performed through the Washington State Patrol Firearms Background Check Program , a centralized stated system, rather than through local law enforcement agencies.
  • A 10-day waiting period is required between the purchase and delivery of the firearm to the purchaser.
  • The purchaser must provide proof of having completed a recognized firearm safety training program within the last five years.

Firearm transfers to museums and historical societies are now exempt from any background check requirement — See RCW 9.41.113 (j) as well as a September 8, 2023, NW News Network article for detail on the background of this new law. 

Sealed Juvenile Records

Juvenile court records are sealed pursuant to court order and the sealed records are confidential, with limited exceptions. RCW 13.50.260 was amended by HB 1600 to allow for the sharing of sealed juvenile records with non-Washington criminal justice agencies solely for the purpose of conducting a background check for processing firearms transfers and licenses and releasing firearms from evidence.

MRSC has more general information on disclosure of juvenile records on its Disclosure of Juvenile Law Enforcement Records webpage.

Increased Responsibility for Firearms Industry Members

The Legislature also adopted the Firearm Industry Responsibility and Gun Violence Victims’ Access to Justice Act , making certain actions of firearm industry members a public nuisance. The law requires firearm industry members to implement reasonable controls in the form of procedures, safeguards, and business practices aimed at preventing certain occurrences, such as the sale of firearms to straw purchasers or gun traffickers.

It also prohibits industry members from selling firearm products in a manner that targets minors or those who are prohibited from possessing a firearm, or that could foreseeably promote conversion of a legal firearm product into an illegal one.

The attorney general is charged with investigating and bringing a public nuisance claim against firearm industry members that violate the law. Harmed members of the public may also bring a public nuisance claim to court. Actions may also be taken under the Consumer Protection Act, chapter 19.86 RCW .

Concluding Thoughts

While it takes some effort to stay abreast of the gun control laws in effect at the federal and state level, the Washington State Attorney General’s Firearms webpage highlights state firearms legislation. Additionally MRSC’s Firearms Regulation webpage covers the role of local government in regulating firearms in Washington State.

MRSC will continue to update our materials and publish more blogs as the firearm regulation landscape evolves.

MRSC is a private nonprofit organization serving local governments in Washington State. Eligible government agencies in Washington State may use our free, one-on-one Ask MRSC service to get answers to legal, policy, or financial questions.

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About Flannary Collins

Flannary Collins is the managing attorney for MRSC. She first joined MRSC as a legal consultant in August 2013 after serving as assistant city attorney for the city of Shoreline where she advised all city departments on a wide range of issues. Flannary became the managing attorney in 2018. In this role, she manages the MRSC legal team of five attorneys.

At MRSC, Flannary enjoys providing legal guidance to municipalities on all municipal issues, including the OPMA, PRA, and elected officials’ roles and responsibilities. She also serves on the WSAMA Board of Directors as Secretary-Treasurer.

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Firearms Regulation

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Will Washington's new gun restrictions hold up in court?

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caption: A woman points a handgun with a laser sight on a wall display of other guns during the National Rifle Association convention Friday, April 13, 2007, in St. Louis.

As of the new fiscal year, there are two new bans on untraceable guns . Earlier this month, Washington state expanded locations where weapons are prohibited or restricted.

Olympia correspondent, Austin Jenkins spoke to KUOW's Angela King about the details of these new laws.

Read the full report here .

Cracking down on "ghost guns"

Ghost guns are untraceable as they don't have serial numbers. Jenkins said lawmakers are responding to a "proliferation" of untraceable guns. One can buy a ghost gun online. People can even build them at home by downloading a design plan from the web and using a 3D printer.

Jenkins said the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms is facing an "explosion" of these types of guns in recent years. In 2016, law enforcement collected 17,000 untraceable guns. In 2021, the number shot up to 19,000. Nationally, about 700 of these guns were involved in homicides or attempted homicides.

Jenkins said Washington law enforcement is anecdotally seeing more untraceable guns. He noted that these homemade ghost guns tend to appeal to hobbyists and firearm collectors. But they are also attractive to criminals, because they can't be traced.

Banning the sale of gun magazines with more then 10 rounds

According to Jenkins, advocates of the ban say, "It's designed to reduce the risk of mass shootings." Gun-rights advocates already filed a lawsuit questioning the constitutionality of the ban.

Expanding restricted and no-weapon zones

Under the new rules, one cannot openly carry firearms in local government buildings, like city hall, where public meetings are held. According to Jenkins, guns are now banned in school-board meetings that take place on school district owned or leased property. This also applies to concealed weapons.

Bans were also expanded to include election facilities, ballot-counting centers, and voter-registration offices. Jenkins said the ban exempts concealed pistol permit holders. However, there are no exceptions at counting centers while ballots are actively being counted.

Will the Supreme Court's recent ruling regarding concealed-carry weapons impact Washington state's gun laws?

According to Jenkins, the answer is "probably not." That's because Washington allows concealed and often openly carrying weapons. But, the ruling shows, the conservative-leaning court is willing to overturn state-level laws. It opens up a possibility for Washington's laws to be challenged and even ruled unconstitutional.

"Keep in mind that Washington state Constitution actually has a stronger gun-rights clause than the U.S. Constitution," Jenkins said. According to the Washington Constitution, Article 1, Section 24: "the right of the individual citizen to bear arms in defense of himself, or the state, shall not be impaired...."

Will a ruling that California's ban of the sale of semi-automatic weapons to people under 21 is unconstitutional impact Washington state?

Right now, there is no impact, according to Jenkins. But, there is a similar restriction in Washington state that was also challenged. Advocates of the age limitations told Jenkins, they are "fairly confident" the ban will prevail. The constitutionality of Washington's ban will ultimately be decided in the courts.

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Morning News Host

Angela King is the local host of Morning Edition. She’s been a part of the northwest news scene since the early 1990s. A proud University of Washington alumna, with degrees in broadcast journalism and American ethnic studies, she started her career as a news writer in Seattle, before becoming a reporter and anchor in Seattle, Portland and Albuquerque.

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Announcer / Producer

Natalie is a recent graduate from Washington State University. She started writing radio features at her high school’s radio station 889 TheBridge and soon thereafter participated in RadioActive's summer 2016 workshop.

Katie Campbell

Senior Producer, Morning Edition

Katie Campbell joined KUOW in 2021 as the senior producer on KUOW's Morning Edition. She works with local host Angela King to bring listeners stories from around the world, nation and our region.

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Minimum wage, ghost guns, and more: New Washington laws set to take effect in 2023

Several new laws are set to take effect in Washington at the beginning of the new year, involving rideshares, overtime, job postings, and more.

A look at the highlights:

Companies that employ 15 or more employees must begin to include a salary range in job postings. The bill, which was passed last February, includes internal transfers to a new position or promotion.

“Every job seeker deserves to have all the information they need to make the best career decision for themselves and their family,” State Sen. Emily Randall -- the bill’s sponsor -- said.

Also starting January 1, Washington’s minimum wage will increase to $15.74 an hour , the highest of any state.

Agricultural workers will have to work fewer hours to be eligible for overtime pay when the law that says they must work at least 48 hours in a workweek goes into effect. In 2024, overtime eligibility will be lowered to 40 hours.

Rideshare drivers will also have the right to minimum trip pay, paid sick time, workers’ compensation coverage and protection from retaliation for exercising those rights.

Speed limits on Tacoma’s residential streets will be lowered from 25 mph to 20 mph starting on Jan. 1.

Beginning March 10, 2023, possessing, receiving, or transporting a “ghost gun” becomes illegal. After June 30, 2023, manufacturing or creating “ghost guns” will also be prohibited.

©2022 Cox Media Group

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Newsweek

New Gun Laws Take Effect in Five States Today

Posted: January 1, 2024 | Last updated: January 2, 2024

Several states are ringing in the new year with increased gun control as mass shootings continue to devastate lives.

Gun violence has become a major concern across the nation, with mass shootings in schools, nightclubs and homes more prevalent. There were 656 mass shootings in 2023, versus 646 in 2022, according to the Gun Violence Archive, which defines a mass shooting as a single event in which four or more people, excluding the shooter, are shot or killed.

While most mass killings with guns happen inside a home, 12 percent occur in businesses, 6 percent in public areas, 2 percent in schools and 1 percent in religious settings, according to a database maintained by the Associated Press, USA Today and Northeastern University.

A new law in California, which took effect Monday, aims to curb gun violence in public. The law will ban people from carrying a gun in most public places, including libraries and sports venues.

The law is being challenged in court. On December 20, a U.S. District judge blocked the law from taking effect, ruling that it violates Californians' Second Amendment right to bear arms. On Saturday, a federal appeals court put a temporary hold on the ruling, which allows the law to take effect, until the appeals court rules on it.

In October, an Army reservist carrying an assault-style weapon opened fire at a bowling alley and restaurant in Maine, killing 18 people and injuring 13. Officials said that the suspected shooter, Robert Card , had a history of mental illness, but there was no evidence that he had ever been involuntarily committed. He was later found dead from a self-inflicted gunshot wound

Following the shooting, Maine officials said that a red flag law could have made a difference. Such laws allow state courts to temporarily seize guns from people whom they believe could be a risk to themselves or others.

On Monday, a new red flag law took effect in Minnesota. It allows family members and law enforcement personnel to petition for an extreme risk protection order if they believe a person who has a gun is at risk of endangering that individual or others. Minnesota is the 20th state to enforce a red flag law.

Illinois is banning high-powered semiautomatic rifles and high-capacity magazines starting Monday, while Washington state is expanding its gun purchasing laws.

The gun ban in Illinois was challenged in court after it was signed into law by Governor J.B. Pritzker on January 10. State Representative Dan Caulkins filed a lawsuit against Pritzker arguing that the banning of high-powered semiautomatic rifles and high-capacity magazines violates the state's constitution. But the Illinois Supreme Court upheld the ban in a ruling in August.

Washington already had a 10-day waiting period to buy a semiautomatic weapon, but on Monday the waiting period was expanded to purchases of any firearm. New legislation will require gun buyers to show that they have passed a firearm safety training program in the past five years.

Ghost guns are also becoming a more pervasive issue . These are firearms that do not have a serial number and can be bought online and assembled at home. Since they are untraceable, gun purchasing regulations do not apply to the buyer, and anyone, including minors and prohibited purchasers, can get their hands on a ghost gun.

Over the summer, Colorado Governor Jared Polis signed a ghost gun ban into law, and it took effect Monday. But two gun rights groups, the National Association of Gun Rights and Rocky Mountain Gun Owners, have filed a federal lawsuit against Polis over the ban, claiming that it violates the Second Amendment rights of gun owners.

Gun rights advocates continue to oppose strengthening restrictions, citing what they see as their Second Amendment rights. Such advocates also see owning a gun as a protection against increasing gun violence.

The CEO of the National Rifle Association, Wayne LaPierre, said after the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in December 2012, "The only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun." Twenty students and six adults were killed at the Newtown, Connecticut, school.

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Gun Rights Groups Sue Colorado Over the State's Ban on 'Ghost Guns,' Which Lack Serial Numbers

Gun rights groups have filed a federal lawsuit challenging Colorado’s ban on so-called ghost guns

Gun Rights Groups Sue Colorado Over the State's Ban on 'Ghost Guns,' Which Lack Serial Numbers

Uncredited

FILE - This image provided by U.S. Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of New York, shows a ghost gun seized in undercover transactions in New York. On Monday, Jan. 1, 2023, gun rights groups filed a federal lawsuit challenging Colorado's ban on so-called ghost guns. (U.S. Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of New York via AP, File)

DENVER (AP) — Gun rights groups have filed a federal lawsuit challenging Colorado 's ban on so-called ghost guns — firearms without serial numbers assembled at home or 3D printed that are difficult for law enforcement to trace and allow people to evade background checks.

The litigation filed Monday is the latest of several Second Amendment lawsuits aimed at a slew of gun control regulations passed by Colorado's majority Democratic legislature and signed by Democratic Gov. Jared Polis last year.

The ban on ghost guns took effect Monday and follows a dramatic rise in their reported use in crimes, jumping by 1,000% between 2017 and 2021, according to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

The law bars anyone in Colorado except licensed firearm manufacturers from creating gun frames and receivers, which house internal components. It also prohibits the transport and possession of frames and receivers that don't have serial numbers.

The lawsuit filed by the Rocky Mountain Gun Owners and the National Association for Gun Rights alleges that the ban infringes on Americans' Second Amendment rights.

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washington state ghost gun law

“This law is an outright assault on the constitutional rights of peaceable Coloradans. It’s not just an overreach; it’s a direct defiance to our Second Amendment freedoms,” said Taylor Rhodes, executive director of the Rocky Mountain Gun Owners, in a statement.

Rhodes said the Supreme Court's ruling last year , which is considered an expansion of gun rights, reinforces their case in Colorado, pointing to a long history in America of citizens being their own gunsmiths.

“The Supreme Court made it clear that any law infringing on the right to bear arms must align with the historical understanding of the Second Amendment," said Rhodes, “If homemade – unserialized – guns weren’t legal at the time of our nation’s founding, we would all have a British accent.”

Shelby Wieman, a spokesperson for Polis, declined to comment citing ongoing litigation. As Colorado's governor, Polis was named as the defendant in Monday's lawsuit.

The other gun control laws passed last year facing legal challenges include raising the minimum age to purchase a firearm from 18 to 21 and imposing a three-day waiting period between purchase and receipt of a firearm.

Democratic President Joe Biden has similarly cracked down on ghost guns with the new rules also being challenged in federal court.

Bedayn is a corps member for the Associated Press/Report for America Statehouse News Initiative. Report for America is a nonprofit national service program that places journalists in local newsrooms to report on undercovered issues.

Copyright 2024 The  Associated Press . All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Gun rights groups sue Colorado over the state’s ban on ‘ghost guns,’ which lack serial numbers

FILE - This image provided by U.S. Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of New York, shows a ghost gun seized in undercover transactions in New York. On Monday, Jan. 1, 2023, gun rights groups filed a federal lawsuit challenging Colorado's ban on so-called ghost guns. (U.S. Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of New York via AP, File)

FILE - This image provided by U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York, shows a ghost gun seized in undercover transactions in New York. On Monday, Jan. 1, 2023, gun rights groups filed a federal lawsuit challenging Colorado’s ban on so-called ghost guns. (U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York via AP, File)

washington state ghost gun law

  • Copy Link copied

DENVER (AP) — Gun rights groups have filed a federal lawsuit challenging Colorado’s ban on so-called ghost guns — firearms without serial numbers assembled at home or 3D printed that are difficult for law enforcement to trace and allow people to evade background checks.

The litigation filed Monday is the latest of several Second Amendment lawsuits aimed at a slew of gun control regulations passed by Colorado’s majority Democratic legislature and signed by Democratic Gov. Jared Polis last year.

The ban on ghost guns took effect Monday and follows a dramatic rise in their reported use in crimes, jumping by 1,000% between 2017 and 2021, according to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

The law bars anyone in Colorado except licensed firearm manufacturers from creating gun frames and receivers, which house internal components. It also prohibits the transport and possession of frames and receivers that don’t have serial numbers.

FILE - A hearse and van sit outside the Return to Nature Funeral Home, Oct. 6, 2023, in Penrose, Colo. Investigators who entered the funeral home encountered stacks of partially covered human remains, bodily fluids several inches deep on the floor and flies, an FBI agent testified Thursday, Jan. 11, 2024. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, File)

The lawsuit filed by the Rocky Mountain Gun Owners and the National Association for Gun Rights alleges that the ban infringes on Americans’ Second Amendment rights.

“This law is an outright assault on the constitutional rights of peaceable Coloradans. It’s not just an overreach; it’s a direct defiance to our Second Amendment freedoms,” said Taylor Rhodes, executive director of the Rocky Mountain Gun Owners, in a statement.

Rhodes said the Supreme Court’s ruling last year , which is considered an expansion of gun rights, reinforces their case in Colorado, pointing to a long history in America of citizens being their own gunsmiths.

“The Supreme Court made it clear that any law infringing on the right to bear arms must align with the historical understanding of the Second Amendment,” said Rhodes, “If homemade – unserialized – guns weren’t legal at the time of our nation’s founding, we would all have a British accent.”

Shelby Wieman, a spokesperson for Polis, declined to comment citing ongoing litigation. As Colorado’s governor, Polis was named as the defendant in Monday’s lawsuit.

The other gun control laws passed last year facing legal challenges include raising the minimum age to purchase a firearm from 18 to 21 and imposing a three-day waiting period between purchase and receipt of a firearm.

Democratic President Joe Biden has similarly cracked down on ghost guns with the new rules also being challenged in federal court.

Bedayn is a corps member for the Associated Press/Report for America Statehouse News Initiative. Report for America is a nonprofit national service program that places journalists in local newsrooms to report on undercovered issues.

JESSE BEDAYN

IMAGES

  1. HB 1705 Passed

    washington state ghost gun law

  2. Ghost Gun Ban Becomes Law

    washington state ghost gun law

  3. New Washington laws target 'ghost guns,' tighten firearm rules

    washington state ghost gun law

  4. Are Ghost Guns Legal in Washington State?

    washington state ghost gun law

  5. Bill to Ban Manufacturing of "Ghost Guns" Passes Washington House. Now

    washington state ghost gun law

  6. DC moves to ban 'ghost guns.' And officials say it won't violate the

    washington state ghost gun law

COMMENTS

  1. Washington State Legislature Passes HB 1705 To Close Ghost Gun Loophole

    Alliance for Gun Responsibility applauds this vital progress to address growing gun violence threats OLYMPIA, WA - Today, the Washington State Senate approved two vital gun responsibility bills, HB 1705 to prohibit ghost guns and HB 1630 to restrict firearms at public meetings and election-related locations. HB 1705, sponsored by Rep. Liz Berry (D-36), restricts […]

  2. Ghost Guns in Washington

    In 2019 and 2022, Washington enacted some of the nation's most comprehensive ghost gun legislation, regulating both unserialized and undetectable firearms and limiting the sale, manufacture, distribution, and possession, etc., of unserialized unfinished frames and receivers. 1 Unserialized ("untraceable") firearms:

  3. PDF HOUSE BILL REPORT HB 1705

    Title: An act relating to limiting ghost guns, including untraceable firearms and untraceable unfinished frames and receivers that can be used to manufacture or assemble untraceable firearms, with exceptions for licensed federal firearm manufacturers, dealers, and importers, and firearms that have been rendered permanently inoperable, are antiqu...

  4. Supreme Court reinstates federal 'ghost gun' rule backed by Washington

    Washington is among 13 states with laws to regulate ghost guns, according to Everytown for Gun Safety. The Legislature last year passed a bill to prohibit people from making, assembling, selling, purchasing or knowingly or recklessly possessing untraceable firearms.

  5. New gun restrictions take effect July 1 in Washington

    July 1, 2022 5 a.m. Two new laws aimed at reducing mass shootings and cracking down on the proliferation of so-called "ghost guns" go into effect July 1 in Washington. Majority Democrats in...

  6. New gun restrictions take effect July 1 in Washington

    Two new laws aimed at reducing mass shootings and cracking down on the proliferation of so-called "ghost guns" go into effect July 1 in Washington. Majority Democrats in the state Legislature passed the new restrictions earlier this year.

  7. Attorney General Ferguson's bill to ban 3D-printed ...

    Attorney General Ferguson's bill to ban 3D-printed "ghost guns" passes Legislature Attorney General Ferguson's bill to ban 3D-printed "ghost guns" passes Legislature FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Apr 23 2019 Bipartisan approval sends the bill to the Governor

  8. Ghost gun ban among changes in new Washington state gun laws

    The Seattle Times reports that a law against so-called "ghost guns" takes effect Monday, along with components of a previously instituted law raising the legal purchase age for some guns. A law passed in January raises the purchase age for semi-automatic rifles to 21.

  9. Limits on 'ghost guns,' including 3D-printed guns, clear Washington

    Tom James. The Associated Press. OLYMPIA — The Washington state Legislature on Tuesday approved new limits on untraceable, undetectable firearms, including the 3D-printed guns at the center of a ...

  10. Washington State Legislature

    Concerning ghost guns. Sponsors: Berry, Valdez, Ryu, Fitzgibbon, Berg, Bateman, Duerr, Walen, Callan, Davis, Taylor, Macri, Peterson, Ramel, Ramos, Santos, Senn, Simmons, Slatter, Bergquist, Tharinger, Pollet, Frame, Harris-Talley, Hackney, Kloba Go to documents... Go to videos... Bill History 2022 REGULAR SESSION Dec 27 Prefiled for introduction.

  11. New gun laws take effect in Washington state

    A new law also went into effect July 1 banning untraceable firearms, commonly known as " ghost guns ," in the state. Ghost guns are homemade firearms built by buying individual...

  12. New federal ghost gun laws support ones adopted by WA lawmakers

    Washington State New federal 'ghost gun' regulations will strengthen Washington's new law. Here's how By Shauna Sowersby April 22, 2022 9:55 AM In addition to laws put in place by the...

  13. What Happens if You Get Caught with a Ghost Gun?

    Washington state prohibits the manufacture, assembly, or possession of undetectable firearms, also known as ghost guns. If you are caught with a ghost gun, you could face fines, jail time, or felony charges. Learn more about the penalties, exceptions, and how to defend yourself from this crime.

  14. Governor signs into law 3 new bills that put restrictions on guns in WA

    Inslee then signed House Bill 1705 which places restrictions on "ghost guns" — unserialized and untraceable firearms that can be bought online and assembled at home. Sponsored by Berry, the ...

  15. Changes to ghost guns, high-capacity magazines start July 1

    On July 1, the state of Washington's newest gun laws will go into effect. Those two laws, while seemingly straightforward, have created confusion for some gun owners who are unsure of...

  16. Washington: Senate Works Late to Pass Bans on "Ghost Guns" and Firearms

    Last night, the Washington Senate passed a pair of anti-gun bills that would do nothing to prevent crime and only target the actions of law-abiding gun owners, House Bill 1705 and House Bill 1630.

  17. Washington State's New Gun Safety Laws

    Specific Effective Dates of the New Laws. House Bill 1240: Effective as of the date of signing, April 25, 2023. Senate Bill 5078: Effective 90 days after April 25, 2023. House Bill 1143: Effective January 1, 2024. Understanding the Impact. These laws mark a significant step in Washington State's efforts to reduce gun violence and ensure safety.

  18. 2023 Brings New Firearms Legislation to Washington State

    October 16, 2023 by Flannary Collins Category: New Legislation and Regulations , Firearms The Washington State Legislature (Legislature) passed several firearms-related bills during the 2023 legislative session, all of which local governments should familiarize themselves with.

  19. New laws in effect in Washington state

    The state's new ban on gun magazines holding more than ten rounds took effect on Friday, July 1st. Buying, selling, transferring or manufacturing a so-called ghost gun is also now illegal.

  20. Will Washington's new gun restrictions hold up in court?

    It opens up a possibility for Washington's laws to be challenged and even ruled unconstitutional. "Keep in mind that Washington state Constitution actually has a stronger gun-rights clause than ...

  21. Minimum wage, ghost guns, and more: New Washington laws set to take

    Minimum wage, ghost guns, and more: New Washington laws set to take effect in 2023 By Shawn Garrett, KIRO 7 News December 30, 2022 at 3:53 pm PST By Shawn Garrett, KIRO 7 News December 30, 2022 at ...

  22. Chapter 9.41 RCW: FIREARMS AND DANGEROUS WEAPONS

    Carrying loaded rifle or shotgun in vehicle: RCW 77.15.460. Explosives: Chapter 70.74 RCW. Possessing a stolen firearm: RCW 9A.56.310. Shooting firearm from, across, or along public highway: RCW 77.15.460. Theft of a firearm: RCW 9A.56.300.

  23. NRA-ILA

    GHOST GUNS BAN - HB 1705 further restricts the centuries-old practice of manufacturing firearms for personal use and self-defense by imposing requirements that far exceed those in federal law. It ...

  24. Ghost guns and assault weapons bans: New gun laws in 2024

    Michigan: Red-flag law. Michigan's red-flag law won't take effect until February of 2024, along with three other laws meant to improve gun safety. A gun storage law will require people to lock up firearms around those under 18, and another law will make safety devices for guns, including storage, exempt from the state's sales tax.

  25. New Gun Laws Take Effect in Five States Today

    Over the summer, Colorado Governor Jared Polis signed a ghost gun ban into law, and it took effect Monday. But two gun rights groups, the National Association of Gun Rights and Rocky Mountain Gun ...

  26. Here's how Washington state's new gun law will impact neighboring Idaho

    This new Washington law went into effect at the start of 2024. Washington and Idaho both have laws that address how these new restrictions apply to a Washington resident buying a gun in Idaho, and ...

  27. Gun Rights Groups Sue Colorado Over the State's Ban on 'Ghost Guns

    On Monday, Jan. 1, 2023, gun rights groups filed a federal lawsuit challenging Colorado's ban on so-called ghost guns. (U.S. Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of New York via AP, File ...

  28. Gun rights groups sue Colorado over the state's ban on 'ghost guns

    DENVER (AP) — Gun rights groups have filed a federal lawsuit challenging Colorado's ban on so-called ghost guns — firearms without serial numbers assembled at home or 3D printed that are difficult for law enforcement to trace and allow people to evade background checks.. The litigation filed Monday is the latest of several Second Amendment lawsuits aimed at a slew of gun control ...