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like or befitting a spook or ghost; suggestive of spooks .

eerie; scary.

(especially of horses) nervous; skittish.

Origin of spooky

Other words from spooky.

  • spook·i·ly, adverb
  • spook·i·ness, noun

Words Nearby spooky

Dictionary.com Unabridged Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2024

How to use spooky in a sentence

It’s always interesting and well-directed, even when we’re fed horror cliches galore, from spooky dollhouses to things lurking in the basement.

Thanks to campfire tales and multimillion-dollar horror flicks, spooky notions can infiltrate our subconscious even without any real-life supernatural encounters.

In fact, “investors may be convinced that Halloween was purposely placed in October because the market’s actions can be so spooky ,” CFRA’s Sam Stovall wrote in a recent note.

So much so that CFRA’s Stovall quips, “Investors may be convinced that Halloween was purposely placed in October because the market’s actions can be so spooky .”

For example, key to the quantum internet is entanglement — that “ spooky action at a distance” in which particles are linked across time and space, and measuring the properties of one particle instantly reveals the other’s properties.

Warne looked—in the words of the Daily Mail—“like a spooky waxwork.”

spooky Tooth had reformed quite a while before I received the call and were touring quite often.

When we all saw this, both my brothers turned to look at me in the car and pulled ‘ spooky ’ faces at me.

“As much as I love sunny meadows and bunnies, I also love spooky forests with owls,” she says.

Formerly a playground for Sunday school kids, it has a spooky , cloistered feel to it.

I don't believe there is anything spooky about that building.

"I hate to go through the grove, it's so spooky ," she said, as they hurried along.

And again the ghostly hoot of the owl made the little patch of woods seem more spooky and lonesome.

A lonely owl answered with a dismal shriek from a distant tree, making the night seem still more spooky .

Those were gnomes—the real spooky , spinky kind that give you the shivers up and down your back when they're out gnoming.

British Dictionary definitions for spooky

/ ( ˈspuːkɪ ) /

ghostly or eerie : a spooky house

resembling or appropriate to a ghost

US easily frightened; highly strung

Derived forms of spooky

  • spookily , adverb
  • spookiness , noun

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012

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Definition of 'spooky'

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Spooky in british english, examples of 'spooky' in a sentence spooky, trends of spooky.

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This Halloween: What Does It Mean To Call Something 'Spooky'?

Leah

Leah Donnella

spooky area meaning

A runner passes a ghostly sculpture on display between Bondi Beach and Tamarama Beach in Sydney. Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

A runner passes a ghostly sculpture on display between Bondi Beach and Tamarama Beach in Sydney.

So, you're at your friend's elaborately decorated Halloween party. There are cobwebs hanging from the ceiling, bloody handprints on the wall, a frothing potion brewing on the stove. It's creepy! And scary! But is it ... spooky?

Sure, "spook" can refer to a ghost. It can refer to a spy. But as many of us know, it's also, sometimes, a racial slur for black people. One of our Ask Code Switch readers wrote in to ask about the etiquette of using words like spook and spooky.

During this, the season of murder mysteries and haunted hayrides, is it insensitive to say that you were spooked?

On Halloween, Insensitivity Goes Beyond Kimonos And Black Face

On Halloween, Insensitivity Goes Beyond Kimonos And Black Face

So here's the deal: Spook comes from the Dutch word for apparition, or specter. The noun was first used in English around the turn of the nineteenth century. Over the next few decades, it developed other forms, like spooky, spookish, and of course, the verb, to spook.

From there, it seems, the word lived a relatively innocuous life for many years, existing in the liminal space between surprise and mild fear.

It wasn't until World War II that spook started to refer to black people . The black Army pilots who trained at the Tuskegee Institute were referred to as the "Spookwaffe" — waffe being the German word for weapon, or gun. (Luftwaffe was the name of the German air force).

Once the word "spook" was linked to blackness, it wasn't long before it became a recognizable — if second-tier — slur.

But that wasn't the end of the story for spook. The word had a bit of a renaissance in the 1970s, with the release of the novel and classic film, The Spook Who Sat By The Door , by Sam Greenlee .

Both the book and movie tell the fictional story of the first black man recruited and trained by the CIA. That man goes through his training, works for a little while, and then quits his job and moves back to Chicago, where he secretly trains a group of young black "freedom fighters."

What A Thug's Life Looked Like In 19th Century India

What A Thug's Life Looked Like In 19th Century India

The title of the movie, of course, both refers to spook meaning "black person" and spook meaning "spy." And as a satirical piece of literature written by an African-American author in the years following the civil rights movement, the use of "spook" was infused with an extra dose of irony.

Renee Blake is a sociolinguist who studies the way language is used in society, "whether it's based on race, class, gender or the like." She says she doesn't hear the word spook all that often, but she does have two salient reference points for it.

The first is The Spook Who Sat By The Door , and the second is the 2000 book and 2003 movie The Human Stain, by Phillip Roth. His novel tells the story of a professor at a New England college who is forced to resign after he calls two African-American students spooks.

The word spook hasn't just gotten fictional people in trouble. In 2010, Target apologized for selling a Halloween toy called "Spook Drop Parachuters" — literally miniature black figurines with orange parachutes.

In light of all this baggage, I asked Blake what she thought about the use of words like spook and spooky during Halloween. She said that, while it's clear that spook has multiple, distinct meanings, it's still important to think about context.

The way that certain words get attached to particular racial groups is incredibly complicated. ( Take thug , for example .)

"Be thoughtful about the fact that [spook] now might have the connotation of referring to a black person in a disparaging way," Blake says. "If someone says, 'Did you get spooked?' and there are no black people there, then, OK, you mean 'Did you get scared or frightened?' That's fine, I get it."

But once you insert black people into the situation, Blake says, it's important to be more tactful. "We know that the word 'niggardly' doesn't mean a black person, but let's be sensitive. Are you going to use the word niggardly in front of a group of young students in a classroom? No."

So, this Halloween, be a little cautious when it comes to describing your surroundings. And don't be afraid of creeping into the thesaurus for a spooky synonym.

To me, it's more fun to be aghast, bloodcurdled, or spine-chilled than "spooked."

Got a race question for Code Switch? Ask us here .

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spooky adjective

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What does the adjective spooky mean?

There are four meanings listed in OED's entry for the adjective spooky . See ‘Meaning & use’ for definitions, usage, and quotation evidence.

spooky has developed meanings and uses in subjects including

Entry status

OED is undergoing a continuous programme of revision to modernize and improve definitions. This entry has not yet been fully revised.

How common is the adjective spooky ?

How is the adjective spooky pronounced, british english, u.s. english, where does the adjective spooky come from.

Earliest known use

The earliest known use of the adjective spooky is in the 1850s.

OED's earliest evidence for spooky is from 1854, in Wide West (San Francisco) .

spooky is formed within English, by derivation.

Etymons: spook n. , ‑y suffix 1 .

Nearby entries

  • spoofing, n. & adj. 1920–
  • spooge, n. 1987–
  • spooge, v. 1990–
  • spook, n. 1801–
  • spook, v. 1871–
  • spooked, adj. 1937–
  • spookery, n. 1893–
  • spookily, adv. 1955–
  • spooking, n. 1919–
  • spookist, n. 1902–
  • spooky, adj. 1854–
  • spool, n.¹ c1325–
  • spool, n.² 1496
  • spool, v. 1603–
  • spooled, adj. 1779–
  • spooler, n. 1554–
  • spoolful, n. 1611–
  • spooling, n. c1564–
  • spool-knave, n. 1688
  • spool valve, n. 1908–
  • spool-wood, n. 1895–

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Meaning & use

Pronunciation, compounds & derived words, entry history for spooky, adj..

spooky, adj. was first published in 1986; not yet revised

spooky, adj. was last modified in September 2023

Revision of the OED is a long-term project. Entries in oed.com which have not been revised may include:

  • corrections and revisions to definitions, pronunciation, etymology, headwords, variant spellings, quotations, and dates;
  • new senses, phrases, and quotations which have been added in subsequent print and online updates.

Revisions and additions of this kind were last incorporated into spooky, adj. in September 2023.

Earlier versions of spooky, adj. were published in:

A Supplement to the OED, Volume IV (1986)

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Citation details

Factsheet for spooky, adj., browse entry.

31 of the Scariest Town Names in America

Who needs a trip to Cabo when you can get in touch with your inner Morticia instead?

Bird, Branch, Sky, American crow, Beak, Silhouette, Crow-like bird, Rook, Twig, Crow,

None of these towns are actually haunted — at least as far as we know — but the names will still give you the chills.

Gnaw Bone, Indiana

Motor vehicle, Transport, Sky, Road, Mode of transport, Signage, Street sign, Sign, Lane, Vehicle,

There are a few theories floating around about where this Indiana town got its ghastly distinction. The most popular suggests that Gnaw Bone comes from it's original French settlement name "Narbonne." It sounds a lot less ominous in French.

Scarville, Iowa

Face, Hair, Eyebrow, Eye, Head, Skin, Close-up, Beauty, Nose, Organ,

There are no Lion King villains marching around this small town (the 2010 census recorded only 72 people living there.) The city was simply named after local landowner Ole Scar .

Hell, Michigan

While there are a few theories about where this town got its name, sadly, none have to do with devil horn sightings. Supposedly, the name comes from the "hell-like" conditions early explorers encountered in the area thanks to mosquitoes and challenging wetland.

Tombstone, Arizona

This town was reportedly named by Ed Schieffelin, who was briefly a scout for the U.S. Army searching for ore samples. His friend and former Army Scout Al Sieber was quoted telling Schieffelin "The only rock you will find out there will be your own tombstone."

Casper, Wyoming

No friendly ghosts in this town. Just oil. Casper, a.k.a. "The Oil City" gets its name name from Fort Caspar , even though the spelling is different (which grammarphiles probably also find scary.)

Bad Axe, Michigan

In the early 1900's, Rudolph Papbst and George Wills Pack found a badly damaged axe at the site of the future town, so the men named the campsite Bad Axe which rolled off the tongue a bit more than Useless Hatchett.

Red Devil, Alaska

After mercury deposits were found in the surrounding mountains, this town started calling itself the Red Devil in 1921. Despite the name, there are have been no recorded demon sightings to date.

Dead Women Crossing, Oklahoma

The supposedly haunted town got its moniker from the brutal 1905 murder of schoolteacher Katie DeWitt James , who went missing with her 14-month old baby and was found dead near a creek. Not exactly the most inviting origin story.

NATHAN GUNTER/Flickr

Cape Fear, North Carolina

The name of this famous shoreline dates back to Sir Richard Grenville's 1585 expedition to Roanoke Island. Apparently the ship got stuck behind the cape and the crew was afraid that the ship would capsize, hence the name Cape Fear.

Seven Devils, North Carolina

If you thought one devil was enough, then think again. This Appalachian town was supposedly named after seven 19th century brothers who were so quick to fight that they were named the "seven devils" by locals. And you thought your kids had behavior problems.

GA PEPPY/ Flickr

Devil's Den, Wyoming

This area's foreboding vibe contributed to its spooky name. Devil's Den sits near the Yellowstone River in Wyoming, perfect for backpackers and daring nature adventurers .

West Kill, New York

It may sound like the site of a murder, but the area is totally (err, probably) harmless. It's named after the West Kill stream , which flows through the Devil's Path range of the Catskill Mountains. If you're in the northeast, you'll probably encounter lots of "kills." It sounds grim, but "kille" is actually a Middle Dutch word for "riverbed."

Death Valley, California

This place got its name from a group of pioneers who were lost there in the 1800's. So what if it's one of the hottest places in the world with a record temperature of 134 degrees? That doesn't stop tourists from flocking there and the Star Wars crew from filming there. Just make sure you have enough water with you when you visit.

Black Creek, Georgia

While it may sound like a nasty lake monster lives here, there are no dark waters to be found.

Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina

The murderous name apparently came about in the 1700's after a ship carrying rum crashed in the area. The rum was so foul that it was dubbed "kill-devil." Kill Devil Hills is also the site of the Wright brothers' first controlled airplane flights in the early 1900's.

Cut Off, Louisiana

This Southern town's name comes from a canal cut off that runs through the area. Part of the town is known as Côte Blanche — French for "White Coast" — because of all of the white painted houses that were there for most of the early and mid 1900's.

Deadwood, Oregon

Deadwood supposedly got its name from the dead timber near the town's creek banks.

Vulture City, Arizona

While visiting this town, so called for Vulture Mine — the most productive gold mine in the history of Arizona — you may run into a winged scavenger or two. Or at least that's what the name would suggest.

Frankenstein, Missouri

Unfortunately the mayor of this Osage County community is not Dr. Frankenstein's monster. Oh well. The town most likely got its name from pioneer citizen Godfried Franken .

Salem, Massachusetts

The name itself isn't eerie but its reputation certainly is. Salem is known for being the site of the infamous witch trials in 1692, which unlike Hocus Pocus , didn't exactly have a happy ending.

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Synonyms of spooky

  • as in excitable
  • as in eerie
  • More from M-W
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Thesaurus Definition of spooky

Synonyms & Similar Words

  • hyperkinetic
  • hyperactive
  • hyperexcitable
  • high - strung
  • fiddle - footed
  • melodramatic
  • hot - blooded
  • temperamental
  • hypersensitive
  • emotionalistic
  • perturbable
  • flibbertigibbety

Antonyms & Near Antonyms

  • imperturbable
  • unflappable
  • unexcitable
  • laid - back
  • supernatural
  • metaphysical
  • enigmatical
  • inscrutable
  • preternatural
  • unaccustomed
  • commonplace
  • unremarkable
  • unexceptional
  • predictable

Articles Related to spooky

spoopy slang definition dog with ghost costume photo

The Inside Poop On 'Spoopy'

Notes on a new Halloween classic

Thesaurus Entries Near spooky

Cite this entry.

“Spooky.” Merriam-Webster.com Thesaurus , Merriam-Webster, https://www.merriam-webster.com/thesaurus/spooky. Accessed 3 Mar. 2024.

More from Merriam-Webster on spooky

Nglish: Translation of spooky for Spanish Speakers

Britannica English: Translation of spooky for Arabic Speakers

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This Halloween: What Does It Mean to Call Something "Spooky"?

Please try again

spooky area meaning

So, you’re at your friend’s elaborately decorated Halloween party. There are cobwebs hanging from the ceiling, bloody handprints on the wall, a frothing potion brewing on the stove. It’s creepy! And scary! But is it … spooky?

Sure, “spook” can refer to a ghost. It can refer to a spy. But as many of us know, it’s also, sometimes, a racial slur for black people. One of our Ask Code Switch readers wrote in to ask about the etiquette of using words like spook and spooky.

During this, the season of murder mysteries and haunted hayrides, is it insensitive to say that you were spooked?

So here’s the deal: Spook comes from the Dutch word for apparition, or specter. The noun was first used in English around the turn of the nineteenth century. Over the next few decades, it developed other forms, like spooky, spookish, and of course, the verb, to spook.

From there, it seems, the word lived a relatively innocuous life for many years, existing in the liminal space between surprise and mild fear.

It wasn’t until World War II that spook started to refer to black people . The black Army pilots who trained at the Tuskegee Institute were referred to as the “Spookwaffe” — waffe being the German word for weapon, or gun. (Luftwaffe was the name of the German air force).

Once the word “spook” was linked to blackness, it wasn’t long before it became a recognizable — if second-tier — slur.

But that wasn’t the end of the story for spook. The word had a bit of a renaissance in the 1970s, with the release of the novel and classic film, The Spook Who Sat By The Door , by Sam Greenlee .

Both the book and movie tell the fictional story of the first black man recruited and trained by the CIA. That man goes through his training, works for a little while, and then quits his job and moves back to Chicago, where he secretly trains a group of young black “freedom fighters.”

The title of the movie, of course, both refers to spook meaning “black person” and spook meaning “spy.” And as a satirical piece of literature written by an African-American author in the years following the civil rights movement, the use of “spook” was infused with an extra dose of irony.

Renee Blake is a sociolinguist who studies the way language is used in society, “whether it’s based on race, class, gender or the like.” She says she doesn’t hear the word spook all that often, but she does have two salient reference points for it.

The first is The Spook Who Sat By The Door , and the second is the 2000 book and 2003 movie The Human Stain, by Phillip Roth. His novel tells the story of a professor at a New England college who is forced to resign after he calls two African-American students spooks.

The word spook hasn’t just gotten fictional people in trouble. In 2010, Target apologized for selling a Halloween toy called “Spook Drop Parachuters” — literally miniature black figurines with orange parachutes.

In light of all this baggage, I asked Blake what she thought about the use of words like spook and spooky during Halloween. She said that, while it’s clear that spook has multiple, distinct meanings, it’s still important to think about context.

The way that certain words get attached to particular racial groups is incredibly complicated. ( Take thug , for example .)

“Be thoughtful about the fact that [spook] now might have the connotation of referring to a black person in a disparaging way,” Blake says. “If someone says, ‘Did you get spooked?’ and there are no black people there, then, OK, you mean ‘Did you get scared or frightened?’ That’s fine, I get it.”

But once you insert black people into the situation, Blake says, it’s important to be more tactful. “We know that the word ‘niggardly’ doesn’t mean a black person, but let’s be sensitive. Are you going to use the word niggardly in front of a group of young students in a classroom? No.”

So, this Halloween, be a little cautious when it comes to describing your surroundings. And don’t be afraid of creeping into the thesaurus for a spooky synonym.

To me, it’s more fun to be aghast, bloodcurdled, or spine-chilled than “spooked.”

Got a race question for Code Switch? Ask us here .

spooky area meaning

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Definition of spooky adjective from the Oxford Advanced American Dictionary

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spooky area meaning

Spoopy Meaning: Exploring the Origins and Popularity of the Internet’s Favorite Halloween Term

By: Author English Study Online

Posted on Last updated: November 1, 2023

Sharing is caring!

Have you ever heard someone use the term “spoopy”? In this article, we’ll take a closer look at the meaning and origins of spoopy, as well as how it’s used in everyday conversation. So, if you’re ready to learn more about this quirky slang term, keep reading!

Spoopy Meaning

Spoopy Meaning

Table of Contents

What Does Spoopy Mean?

Spoopy is a term that has gained popularity on the internet in recent years. It is a playful variation of the word “spooky,” often used to describe something that is both eerie and amusing. The term has become particularly popular around Halloween, where it is often used to describe cute or silly versions of typically spooky subject matter such as ghosts and skeletons.

According to Merriam-Webster, spoopy is “amusing internet slang describing cute, comical, or silly versions of typically spooky subject matter.” It is often used to describe Halloween decorations, costumes, or situations that are both creepy and funny. For example, a puppy dressed up in a ghost costume could be described as spoopy.

The term spoopy originated from a misspelling of the word “spooky” on a Halloween decoration. The misspelling was shared on social media and quickly went viral, leading to the creation of the term spoopy. It has since become a popular term on the internet, particularly among younger generations.

Spoopy is an example of how language can evolve and change over time, particularly with the rise of social media and internet culture. While it may not be a term that everyone is familiar with, it has become a common part of the lexicon for many people, particularly around Halloween.

Spoopy Origin Story

If you’ve ever wondered where the term “spoopy” came from, you’re not alone. The word’s origins are somewhat murky, but it seems to have emerged as a misspelling of the word “spooky” in a Halloween decoration. The misspelling was so charming that it caught on and became a meme, eventually giving rise to the term “spoopy.”

The first known instance of the word “spoopy” appeared in a photograph of a Halloween sign that had been misspelled. The sign was supposed to say “spooky,” but the letter “k” was replaced with a “p,” resulting in the word “spoopy.” The photograph was posted online and quickly went viral, with people sharing it on social media and using the term “spoopy” to describe anything that was both spooky and cute.

Over time, the term “spoopy” has taken on a life of its own, with people using it to describe everything from Halloween decorations to pets in costumes. It has become a popular internet meme, with people creating spoopy images and videos and sharing them online.

While the origins of the term “spoopy” may be somewhat obscure, its popularity is undeniable. It has become a beloved part of internet culture, and it shows no signs of slowing down anytime soon. So the next time you see something that is both spooky and cute, don’t be afraid to describe it as spoopy.

Usage of Spoopy in Pop Culture

Spoopy has become a popular term in pop culture, especially around Halloween season. The term has been used in various ways in social media, memes, and even in mainstream media.

One of the most notable uses of spoopy in pop culture is in the popular game “Animal Crossing: New Horizons.” In the game, players can collect various items and decorations for their virtual homes, including spoopy items such as a spoopy chair, spoopy table, and spoopy rug. This has led to spoopy becoming a popular term among fans of the game.

Spoopy has also been used in various memes and social media posts. For example, a popular meme featuring a dog in a ghost costume with the caption “such a spoopy pupper” has been widely circulated on social media. The use of spoopy in this context adds a comical and cute element to the otherwise spooky image.

In addition to social media and memes, spoopy has also been used in mainstream media. For example, in the TV show “Brooklyn Nine-Nine,” one of the characters uses the term spoopy to describe a Halloween-themed attraction. This shows that spoopy has become a widely recognized term in popular culture.

Overall, spoopy has become a popular term in pop culture, especially around Halloween season. Its use in social media, memes, and mainstream media has helped to solidify its place in popular culture.

Spoopy Vs. Spooky

When Halloween season rolls around, you might start hearing the word “spoopy” thrown around. But what does it mean, and how is it different from “spooky”?

At its core, “spoopy” is just a playful misspelling of “spooky.” However, the two words have taken on slightly different connotations in online slang. While “spooky” typically refers to things that are eerie, unsettling, or frightening in a supernatural way, “spoopy” is used to describe things that are cute, comical, or silly versions of typically spooky subject matter.

For example, a dog dressed up in a sheet-ghost costume might be described as “spoopy.” It’s not meant to be scary, but rather endearingly silly. On the other hand, a haunted house with creaky doors, cobwebs, and ghostly apparitions would be considered “spooky.”

Of course, the line between spoopy and spooky can be blurry. Sometimes, things can be both spoopy and spooky at the same time. For example, a jack-o’-lantern with a goofy grin might be spoopy, but it can also be a little eerie when you see it glowing in the dark.

Overall, the difference between spoopy and spooky is largely a matter of tone and context. Spoopy is a lighthearted way to playfully embrace the spooky season, while spooky is more serious and often associated with genuine fear or unease.

The Role of Internet Memes

If you’ve spent any time on the internet, you’ve likely come across a meme or two. Memes are a form of online communication that use images, videos, or text to convey a message. They can be funny, poignant, or even political. But what do memes have to do with spoopy?

Well, spoopy is actually a meme itself. It originated from a misspelled Halloween sign that went viral on the internet. People found the misspelling of “spooky” to be amusing, and thus, the spoopy meme was born.

Internet memes like spoopy have become a popular way for people to express themselves online. They allow for quick and easy communication, often using humor or irony to convey a message. Memes can also be used to create a sense of community, as people who understand a particular meme can feel like they are part of an inside joke.

The spoopy meme is no exception. It has become a popular way for people to express their love for all things Halloween, while also adding a touch of humor. Spoopy memes often feature cute or comical versions of spooky creatures, such as a puppy in a ghost costume or a cartoon skeleton.

In conclusion, memes have played a significant role in popularizing the spoopy meme. They allow for quick and easy communication, often using humor or irony to convey a message. The spoopy meme has become a popular way for people to express their love for Halloween in a fun and lighthearted way.

Spoopy in Everyday Language

Spoopy is a term that has gained popularity in recent years, especially around Halloween season. It is a playful and humorous way of describing something that is spooky. The term spoopy is often used to describe cute, comical, or silly versions of typically spooky subject matter such as ghosts and skeletons.

You may have seen spoopy used in social media posts, memes, or even in everyday conversations. For example, you might say “That puppy dressed as a ghost is so spoopy!” or “This haunted house is spoopy but not too scary.”

Spoopy has become a part of everyday language, especially in online communities. It is often used to describe things that are meant to be scary but are not actually frightening. For instance, a horror movie that is so bad it’s funny might be described as spoopy.

Here are some examples of how spoopy can be used in everyday language:

  • “This Halloween decoration is spoopy, not scary.”
  • “That costume is spoopy, but it’s also adorable.”
  • “I love spoopy movies that make me laugh more than they scare me.”

The Impact of Spoopy on Halloween Culture

Spoopy is a term that has become increasingly popular in recent years, especially around Halloween. It has had a significant impact on Halloween culture, particularly in the way people celebrate and decorate for the holiday.

One of the main ways that spoopy has impacted Halloween culture is through the creation of spoopy decorations. These decorations often feature cute and comical versions of typically spooky subject matter such as ghosts and skeletons. For example, you might see a dog dressed up in a sheet-ghost costume, or a pumpkin with a silly face. These spoopy decorations have become a staple of Halloween decor and are often used to create a lighthearted and fun atmosphere.

Spoopy has also had an impact on the way people celebrate Halloween. Many people now incorporate spoopy elements into their Halloween parties and events. For example, you might see spoopy-themed food and drinks, such as cupcakes with ghost-shaped sprinkles or cocktails with creepy garnishes. Spoopy music and games have also become popular, adding to the festive atmosphere.

In addition, spoopy has had an impact on the way people talk about Halloween. The term is often used as a playful way to describe something that is both spooky and cute. For example, you might describe a child’s Halloween costume as spoopy if it features a cute ghost or skeleton. Spoopy has become a part of the Halloween lexicon and is often used in social media posts, memes, and other online content.

Overall, spoopy has had a significant impact on Halloween culture, adding a fun and playful element to the holiday. Whether you’re decorating your home, planning a party, or just enjoying the festivities, spoopy is sure to be a part of your Halloween experience.

Spoopy in Commercial Products

Spoopy has become a popular term and trend in commercial products. Many companies have started to incorporate spoopy elements in their products, especially during Halloween season. Here are some examples of spoopy commercial products:

  • Spoopy Decorations: Many stores sell spoopy decorations such as spoopy ghosts, spoopy skeletons, and spoopy pumpkins. You can use these decorations to make your home look spoopy and festive during Halloween season.
  • Spoopy Clothing: Some clothing companies have started to sell spoopy-themed clothing, such as spoopy t-shirts, spoopy socks, and spoopy hoodies. You can wear these clothes to show off your spoopy spirit.
  • Spoopy Food: Some restaurants and food companies have started to offer spoopy-themed food during Halloween season. For example, you can find spoopy cupcakes, spoopy pizzas, and spoopy burgers. These foods are not only spoopy but also delicious.
  • Spoopy Toys: Some toy companies have started to sell spoopy toys, such as spoopy stuffed animals, spoopy action figures, and spoopy board games. These toys are perfect for spoopy-loving kids and adults.
  • Spoopy Games: Some video game companies have started to release spoopy-themed games, such as spoopy horror games and spoopy puzzle games. These games are perfect for spoopy-loving gamers.

In conclusion, spoopy has become a popular trend in commercial products, especially during Halloween season. Many companies have started to incorporate spoopy elements in their products, providing spoopy-loving customers with a wide variety of spoopy options to choose from.

The Evolution of Spoopy Over Time

Spoopy is a term that has evolved over time. It first emerged on October 15, 2009, when Flickr user Mike Woodridge uploaded a photo of what appeared to be a misspelled Halloween sign with the word “spoopy” on it. Since then, the term has gained popularity and has become a common term used during the Halloween season.

Initially, spoopy was used to describe something that was a little spooky but mostly cute. It was an intentional misspelling of the word spooky that was meant to convey a sense of playfulness. However, over time, the meaning of spoopy has expanded to include anything that is cute, comical, or silly versions of typically spooky subject matter such as ghosts and skeletons.

Spoopy has also become a popular term on social media platforms such as Twitter and Instagram. People often use spoopy to describe their Halloween decorations, costumes, and other spooky-themed items. The term has also been used in memes and other internet content.

As spoopy has gained popularity, it has also evolved to include inflections such as spoopier and spoopiest. These inflections are used to describe something that is even more spoopy than usual.

In conclusion, spoopy is a term that has evolved over time to become a popular term used during the Halloween season. It started as a misspelling of the word spooky but has expanded to include anything that is cute, comical, or silly versions of typically spooky subject matter. Spoopy has become a popular term on social media platforms and has also been used in memes and other internet content.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the origin of the word spoopy?

The word “spoopy” is an intentional misspelling of the word “spooky”. It originated from a viral picture of a Halloween decoration that misspelled spooky as spoopy. The term has since become popular in internet slang, particularly around the Halloween season.

What is the difference between spooky and spoopy?

While both words refer to something that is scary or eerie, spoopy is used to describe something that is cute or comical in a spooky way. Spooky, on the other hand, is used to describe something that is genuinely frightening or creepy.

What are some examples of spoopy things?

Some examples of spoopy things include cute Halloween decorations, comical ghost costumes, and silly Halloween-themed videos or memes. Basically, anything that is meant to be spooky but is also amusing or endearing can be considered spoopy.

How do you pronounce spoopy?

Spoopy is pronounced like “spoo-pee”. The emphasis is on the first syllable, and the second syllable is pronounced like the word “pee”.

What are some spoopy games to play?

There are many spoopy games to play, both online and offline. Some popular spoopy games include “Among Us”, “Dead by Daylight”, and “Five Nights at Freddy’s”. These games incorporate elements of horror and suspense, but also have a lighthearted and fun aspect to them.

Why is spoopy popular in the fall season?

Spoopy is popular in the fall season because it is associated with Halloween, which is celebrated in many countries around the world during this time. Halloween is a holiday that is often associated with spooky and eerie things, but it is also a fun and festive occasion that involves dressing up in costumes, decorating homes and businesses, and enjoying treats and sweets. Spoopy captures the playful and whimsical side of Halloween, making it a popular term among those who enjoy this holiday.

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The word \"spoopy\" is an intentional misspelling of the word \"spooky\". It originated from a viral picture of a Halloween decoration that misspelled spooky as spoopy. The term has since become popular in internet slang, particularly around the Halloween season.

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Uncommitted voting campaign targets President Biden over support for Israel in war in Gaza

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An electoral strategy by cease-fire activists protesting President Joe Biden's support for Israel amid its deadly counterattacks in Gaza has garnered interest in a part of the presidential primary ballot many voters' eyes may typically glaze over: the "uncommitted" option.

A last-minute campaign launched weeks ahead of Tuesday's primary election in Michigan calls on voters to withhold their support for Biden in the Democratic presidential primary and instead fill in the "uncommitted" bubble. The Listen to Michigan campaign hopes enough uncommitted votes will persuade Biden to demand a cease-fire.

"Having the option to vote uncommitted gives us a strong unifying vehicle to show our discontent and send a message to Biden that we need a permanent cease-fire," said Listen to Michigan campaign manager Layla Elabed, whose sister U.S. Rep. Rashida Tlaib , D-Detroit, has backed the effort.

After the Listen to Michigan campaign kicked off a few weeks ago, the progressive political organizing group Our Revolution also began calling on voters in Michigan to vote "uncommitted." Both efforts hope to demonstrate that Biden has fragile electoral prospects in Michigan if he doesn't change his administration's handling of the war.

Last week marked the third time the U.S. vetoed a United Nations Security Council resolution calling for an immediate cease-fire in Gaza. The next day the U.S. defended Israeli occupation of Palestinian territories. After the Oct. 7 attack by Hamas that killed about 1,200 people in Israel according to the Israeli government, Biden expressed unequivocal support for the U.S. ally as it fought back with deadly airstrikes in the Gaza Strip. As the Palestinian death toll mounted — now standing at more than 29,000 according to the Gaza Health Ministry — and Biden has faced increasing pressure from some Democrats, the president has shifted his tone somewhat, calling Israeli military actions "over the top."

Prep for the polls: See who is running for president and compare where they stand on key issues in our Voter Guide

"The problem is, it's rhetoric and it's not action," Joseph Geevarghese, executive director of Our Revolution, said of Biden's response. "The rhetorical shift is not enough."

What does it mean to vote uncommitted?

Each party's ballot for the presidential primary lists candidates seeking their party's nomination for the presidency along with an option to vote "uncommitted." Michigan is among the states with an election law that automatically requires placing that option on the ballot. When voters cast an "uncommitted" vote, their votes are tallied and reported out just like election results for candidates.

"When a voter selects 'uncommitted' this implies that they are exercising a 'party vote' but are not committed to any of the candidates listed on the ballot," the Michigan Department of State writes on its website .

But for organizers of the Listen to Michigan and Our Revolution campaigns, voting "uncommitted" is instead a way those advocating for a cease-fire can protest Biden's handling of the war. They've held phone banks and voter canvassing drives leading up to Tuesday's primary.

"We feel that voters in Michigan know that to vote uncommitted is to vote for cease-fire, to vote against war," said Listen to Michigan political strategist Abbas Alawieh. "And so now, every single vote that we get on Tuesday for uncommitted, we will view as a victory in and of itself as a victory in the direction of stopping the funding of the mass killing of Palestinians."

Organizers and some supporters of the "uncommitted" campaign for the Democratic primary argue the push for Biden to embrace calls for a cease-fire could make him a more attractive candidate to voters heading into the fall. An EPIC-MRA survey of 600 active and likely Michigan voters conducted Feb. 13-18 found 53% of respondents − including 74% of self-described Democrats − said Israel should declare a cease-fire with Hamas to negotiate the release of hostages and provide humanitarian aid to Gaza rather than continue with the war.

"This is a catastrophe in Gaza," said former U.S. Rep. Andy Levin, D-Bloomfield Township, during an interview on MSNBC focused on his endorsement of the "uncommitted" push by Our Revolution. "I'm afraid if we don't change course that we can't win on Nov. 5, and that's why I'm pouring my energy into this because we cannot allow Donald Trump to be anywhere near the White House again."

Listen to Michigan leaders said their strategy only targets the primary election. "Our focus is not what happens in November," said Alawieh. "This campaign is laser-focused on getting our president to do the right thing and save lives."

Meanwhile, a separate push by those advocating for a cease-fire seeks to deny Biden a second term, The "Abandon Biden" campaign, has called on voters to do anything other than vote for Biden, including voting uncommitted, selecting another candidate or casting a write-in vote for "Free Palestine."

The Listen to Michigan and Our Revolution campaigns want voters to fill in the "uncommitted" bubble specifically on the Democratic primary ballot, not the Republican primary ballot. Unlike those efforts, "Abandon Biden" has not directed voters wishing to register a protest vote to participate specifically in Michigan's Democratic presidential primary.

How many people typically vote uncommitted in Michigan?

The last time Michigan saw a significant push for voters to vote "uncommitted" was 2008 when Barack Obama took his name off the primary ballot because that year's early primary date violated Democratic National Committee rules. Obama's withdrawal prompted some Democratic leaders to urge Obama supporters to vote "uncommitted." That year, 238,168 — or just over 40% — of participants in Michigan's 2008 presidential primary voted "uncommitted." It was an unusually high share of voters.

For comparison, when Obama ran again in 2012 — the last time a Democratic presidential incumbent sought re-election — just 20,833 — or nearly 11 percent of voters in the Democratic presidential primary voted "uncommitted." In 2016 , less than 2% of voters in each party's primary voted "uncommitted," and in 2020, just over one percent of voters in the Democratic primary voted "uncommitted" while about 4% of Republican voters did the same in their party's contest.

Elabed said the Listen to Michigan campaign hopes to see 10,000 "uncommitted" votes in the Democratic presidential primary results. Geevarghese said Our Revolution aims for 10,000 to 20,000 "uncommitted" votes. The 2020 Democratic contest saw 19,106 "uncommitted" votes. While 10,000 "uncommitted" votes in the Democratic primary this year would be fewer than the "uncommitted" votes in 2020, it's possible the party's election Tuesday could see an increase in the share of "uncommitted" votes with lower turnout.

Alawieh noted the significance of 10,000 votes: it's the rough margin by which Trump defeated Hillary Clinton in 2016 in Michigan, delivering the state to the Republican presidential candidate for the first time since 1988. It was the slimmest victory for Trump of any state he won.

Contact Clara Hendrickson at [email protected] or 313-296-5743. Follow her on X, previously called Twitter, @clarajanehen .

Looking for more on Michigan’s elections this year? Check out our voter guide , subscribe to our elections newsletter and always feel free to share your thoughts in a letter to the editor .

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Three Alabama clinics pause IVF services after court rules that embryos are children

Less than a week after the Alabama Supreme Court ruled that embryos created through in vitro fertilization are considered children,   three IVF providers in the state have suspended services as they consider the legal repercussions of the decision.

The University of Alabama at Birmingham was first to announce the change on Wednesday. Then another practice, Alabama Fertility, posted a statement Thursday on social media saying it would put a hold on IVF treatments. The Center for Reproductive Medicine at Mobile Infirmary — the clinic sued in the court case — said Thursday that it would pause IVF procedures starting Saturday.

“We understand the burden this places on deserving families who want to bring babies into this world,” said Mark Nix, CEO of Infirmary Health, the system that includes Mobile Infirmary.

In its statement, Alabama Fertility said it was trying to find solutions for affected patients and "working as hard as we can to alert our legislators as to the far reaching negative impact of this ruling on the women of Alabama."

Hannah Echols, a spokesperson for UAB, said that health system will continue to offer egg retrieval but will no longer fertilize eggs or develop embryos.

"We are saddened that this will impact our patients’ attempt to have a baby through IVF, but we must evaluate the potential that our patients and our physicians could be prosecuted criminally or face punitive damages for following the standard of care for IVF treatments," Echols said in a statement.

The practice of IVF involves combining sperm and eggs in a lab to create embryos, then implanting one or more of those embryos in a person’s uterus. Extra embryos are often frozen and stored; however, embryos are also frequently discarded if they have genetic abnormalities or if patients do not need to use them.

Because of the Alabama Supreme Court ruling, IVF providers now fear they or their patients could face legal penalties if they discard any embryos.

However, many questions remain about the ruling's implications. The judges' decision came in response to a unique case in which a person wandered into an unlocked storage area at Mobile Infirmary in Mobile, Alabama, and dropped several frozen embryos on the floor.

The court determined on Feb. 16 that the clinic's failure to secure that storage area violated the state’s Wrongful Death Act — which says an unjustified or negligent act that leads to someone’s death is a civil offense — because the frozen embryos were considered human beings.

Meghan Cole, a patient at Alabama Fertility, has a rare blood disorder that prevents her from safely carrying children, so she had been planning to start a family through IVF and surrogacy. The surrogate set to carry Cole's baby was supposed to receive an embryo implantation on Friday.

But last night, Cole's doctor called to tell her the implantation appointment had been canceled. Now she doesn't know when she'll be able to use her embryos.

"I thought it was going to be one of the best days of our lives tomorrow, and now we’re just devastated," she said.

However, other fertility practices in the state continue to offer IVF, hoping the legal confusion will resolve in their favor soon.

"We're not pausing our IVF services. I don't see a reasonable need to do that," said Dr. Brett Davenport, a reproductive endocrinologist at Fertility Institute of North Alabama.

"I have been working hard on adjusting our consent forms so that we can have a discussion with the patients who are now going through IVF or about to have an embryo transfer to where they now are aware of this law, they're aware of the implications," he added.

Huntsville Reproductive Medicine said it was proceeding with IVF treatments, as well, but that it does not plan to discard any frozen embryos for the time being without a notary-signed consent from patients. Before the Alabama ruling, the clinic was set to discard several batches of frozen embryos that had been abandoned, it said — some of which were from 16 years ago.

Gail Deady, senior staff attorney at the Center for Reproductive Rights, said the Alabama ruling suggests IVF providers could face civil — not criminal — penalties in some situations, meaning they’d have to pay damages.

The Medical Association of Alabama on Wednesday called on the Alabama Supreme Court to reconsider or suspend its ruling so that residents can have continued access to IVF.

It said the ruling, and UAB's subsequent decision to suspend IVF treatments, “will likely lead to fewer babies — children, grandchildren, nieces, nephews, and cousins — as fertility options become limited for those who want to have a family.”

RESOLVE: The National Infertility Association called the ruling cruel and said UAB had been “forced to make an impossible decision: pause IVF procedures for those hoping to build their families or put their patients and doctors at risk of prosecution.”

In 2021, more than 97,000 infants were born in the U.S. using assisted reproductive technology, which includes IVF. Globally, IVF results in more than 500,000 deliveries per year.

spooky area meaning

Aria Bendix is the breaking health reporter for NBC News Digital.

Is the greater Columbus area in tornado alley? Here's what you need to know

spooky area meaning

Wednesday morning's storm may be the latest evidence that tornadoes are becoming as synonymous with mid-to-late winter as snow storms .

But does Greater Columbus belong to what is known as "Tornado Alley?"

At least one tornado is suspected to have touched down in neighboring Madison County, according to the National Weather Service. If it's confirmed, it won't be the first time central Ohio has seen a twister during the time of year more closely associated with cold weather rather than violent thunderstorms.

The trend has some asking what's going on and whether an infamous geographical section of the country may be shifting eastward and into the Columbus area.

A history of twisters: Search a database of tornadoes in Ohio since 1950

"Tornado alley" is a long swath of land that stretches over the great plains region of the U.S. and includes Oklahoma, Texas and Kansas. Some have speculated that tornado alley's eastward movement may mean portions of central Ohio are now part of the infamous area where twisters are thought to be more common.

Although Ohio had its fair share of twisters already this year, there's more to the data than meets the eye.

Here's what experts are saying about whether tornado alley now runs through Columbus:

How many tornadoes touched down in Ohio and the U.S. last year?

A total of 1,423 tornadoes are believed to have popped up across the United States in 2023, according to preliminary data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The majority of tornadoes occur in the spring in southern states and in the summer in northern states, although they can touch down any day of the year, according to the National Weather Service (NWS).

At least 56 of those twisters touched down in Ohio in 2023 compared with 32 total in 2022, the NOAA reports.

Related storm article: 'I was stunned." Central Ohio homeowners assess the damage from storms, possible tornado

While Ohio's share of twisters may seem like a lot, the state's 56 tornadoes in 2023 still pale in comparison to Illinois' 136 twisters and Alabama's 101, data shows.

Before Wednesday's storms, at least two tornadoes were confirmed in Ohio so far in 2024, according to the NOAA. Nationwide, at least 70 have been confirmed in 2024 to date.

What does last year's high number of tornadoes mean?

In short, it's hard to say, said Jana Houser, associate professor of meteorology at Ohio State.

While the increased number of twisters is concerning, Houser said it's not necessarily a sign that tornado alley is moving eastward into Ohio.

That's due in part to the fact that the Columbus area may have a year or two in a row with a high number of tornadoes, but it's not every year, she said.

"As far as where we are specifically here in Ohio, there's not any statistically significant evidence to say we're seeing more of a frequency of tornadoes," Houser said. "What we are seeing is a greater degree of variability from year to year. Some years there's nothing and others it's more active."

The year-to-year differences are thought to likely related to climate change, though it's unclear, Houser and others said.

Is tornado alley moving at all then?

While the jury is still out as to whether tornado alley is moving into central Ohio, Houser said there is more evidence that it's shifting toward another part of the country.

Tornado alley has historically run through states such as Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska. However, the southeastern United States is seeing far more outbreaks in recent years, Houser and Aaron Wilson, climatologist at the State Climate Office of Ohio and an assistant professor at Ohio State University. both said.

In fact, at least 200 of the 595 tornadoes, or 34% of ones that have touched down in 2023, occurred in the southeastern states of Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Tennessee, South Carolina and North Carolina, according to the NOAA.

Read More: When does summer start in Ohio? There's more than one answer

While more than a third of twisters in 2023 have occurred in the southeastern U.S., Wilson said it's important to approach the idea that tornado alley is moving with a bit of skepticism. More time must pass, and more research must be done to confirm any movement, Wilson said.

"We have to be really cautious, because there have been a lot of low numbers in recent years," he said about tornadoes. "There's more evidence in the Southeast, but I'm not sure yet that I would be confident in making that statement about the Ohio Valley."

If it's really unclear, where does this idea come from that tornado alley is moving?

The concept that tornado alley may be shifting eastward is an idea that's percolated for years, Wilson said. He joked that he's received something like 75 media requests on the topic this year alone.

What it comes down to is a reporting bias, Wilson said. People are more aware of dangerous storms and are therefore reporting far more suspected tornado sightings today than they were decades ago, he said.

That results in more investigations as to whether a twister touched down, and inevitably, more confirmed tornadoes, Wilson said.

"We detect and witness a lot more tornadoes today than we did in the 1950s," he said.

Related article: Parts of central Ohio without power as storms, possible tornado rip through region

Houser agreed, and said human bias is likely to blame for increased reports as everyone has a camera in their pocket and better access to technology to report tornadoes.

Tornadoes are measured for their size and intensity on something called the Enhanced Fujita Scale, with the weakest tornado being labeled an EF0 and the strongest being rated an EF5, according to the NWS.

The fact that there has been a surge in reports of EF0 and EF1 tornadoes shows that weaker ones are likely getting reported more often than they used to because they're getting noticed more, Houser said.

Along with more reports and observations, Houser said the narrative that tornado alley is moving is an interesting one that grabs everyone's attention.

"I think because we are creatures of the moment and we see an example like this year where we see tornadoes in Ohio early in the year, it sticks with us," she said. "It seems like it fits that narrative ... even if it doesn't"

Will climate change cause more twisters or changes to tornado alley?

While one year with more tornadoes may not have many long-term implications, it's believed that climate change is impacting twisters in some way, though it's hard to pinpoint, said Geddy Davis, program coordinator at the State Climate Office of Ohio

Although they can cause widespread destruction, Davis said tornadoes are considered a smaller, more isolated weather phenomenon than something like a hurricane. That makes it difficult, if not impossible, to link any one tornado to climate change, Davis said.

But it's clear that climate change is having an impact on the seasonality of tornadoes, Houser said.

Severe winter thunderstorms, which used to be fairly rare, are more common she said. That means there could be more opportunities for tornadoes to form, Houser said.

Tornadoes, she said, are "fickle" and require a lot of ingredients to come together, such as a thunderstorm, warm air near the earth's surface, cold air higher up in the atmosphere and high winds. Warmer winters may be bringing all those ingredients together more often and at different times than they used to though, she said.

"We're seeing these very volatile, high energy cold season storms," she said. "Those ones are really driving up the (tornado) count."

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COMMENTS

  1. Spooky Definition & Meaning

    The meaning of SPOOKY is strange, unsettling, or frightening in a way that suggests the supernatural : eerie, uncanny; sometimes, specifically : relating to, resembling, or suggesting ghosts or spooks. How to use spooky in a sentence.

  2. SPOOKY definition and meaning

    3 meanings: informal 1. ghostly or eerie 2. resembling or appropriate to a ghost 3. US easily frightened; highly strung.... Click for more definitions.

  3. Spooky Area synonyms

    Synonyms for Spooky Area (other words and phrases for Spooky Area). Synonyms for Spooky area. 9 other terms for spooky area- words and phrases with similar meaning. Lists. synonyms. antonyms. definitions. sentences. thesaurus. phrases. Parts of speech. nouns. suggest new. eerie area. n. ghostly area. n. creepy area. n.

  4. SPOOKY

    SPOOKY definition: 1. strange and frightening: 2. strange and frightening: . Learn more.

  5. SPOOKY Definition & Usage Examples

    Spooky definition: . See examples of SPOOKY used in a sentence.

  6. Spooky

    spooky: 1 adj unpredictably excitable (especially of horses) Synonyms: flighty , nervous , skittish excitable easily excited

  7. spooky adjective

    Definition of spooky adjective in Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary. Meaning, pronunciation, picture, example sentences, grammar, usage notes, synonyms and more.

  8. SPOOKY definition in American English

    Definition of spooky from the Collins English Dictionary. Read about the team of authors behind Collins Dictionaries. New from Collins Quick word challenge. Quiz Review. Question: 1 - Score: 0 / 5. COLD-BLOODED ANIMALS. ... Area 51, Starship, and Harvest Moon: September's Words in the News.

  9. This Halloween: What Does It Mean To Call Something 'Spooky'?

    On Halloween, Insensitivity Goes Beyond Kimonos And Black Face. So here's the deal: Spook comes from the Dutch word for apparition, or specter. The noun was first used in English around the turn ...

  10. spooky, adj. meanings, etymology and more

    There are four meanings listed in OED's entry for the adjective spooky. See 'Meaning & use' for definitions, usage, and quotation evidence. spooky has developed meanings and uses in subjects including . surfing (1960s) espionage (1970s) Entry status. OED is undergoing a continuous programme of revision to modernize and improve definitions. ...

  11. spooky

    spooky meaning: strange and frightening: . Learn more. {{#verifyErrors}} {{message}} {{/verifyErrors}} {{^verifyErrors}} {{#message}}

  12. Before You Use the Word 'Spooky' You Should Know Its Racist ...

    According to Merriam-Webster, the word "spooky" is defined as, "relating to, resembling or suggesting spooks." A further break-down of "spook" gives way to the meaning, "ghost, specter" or "an ...

  13. Scariest Town Names in America

    This area's foreboding vibe contributed to its spooky name. Devil's Den sits near the Yellowstone River in Wyoming, perfect for backpackers and daring nature adventurers . Advertisement - Continue ...

  14. 13 Spooky Words in English That Give Us Chills

    4 Phantasm. "Phantasm" conjures a haunting image of an unnatural apparition. Emerging from the supernatural, a phantasm might be seen so faintly, so momentarily, that its beholder questions the reality of the surrounding world.

  15. SPOOKY Synonyms: 110 Similar and Opposite Words

    Synonyms for SPOOKY: excitable, nervous, unstable, volatile, anxious, hyper, jumpy, emotional; Antonyms of SPOOKY: imperturbable, unshakable, unflappable, cool ...

  16. SPOOKY

    SPOOKY meaning: 1. strange and frightening: 2. strange and frightening: . Learn more.

  17. This Halloween: What Does It Mean to Call Something "Spooky"?

    That man goes through his training, works for a little while, and then quits his job and moves back to Chicago, where he secretly trains a group of young black "freedom fighters." The title of the movie, of course, both refers to spook meaning "black person" and spook meaning "spy." And as a satirical piece of literature written by an African ...

  18. spooky adjective

    Definition of spooky adjective in Oxford Advanced American Dictionary. Meaning, pronunciation, picture, example sentences, grammar, usage notes, synonyms and more.

  19. Portland, Oregon, is in a state of emergency over fentanyl

    The mayor, a county chairperson and the governor have declared at 90-day state of emergency to address the public health and safety crisis driven by fentanyl in Central City and as state lawmakers ...

  20. The Scoop on "Spoopy": Where It Comes From & What It Means

    Is "spoopy" really just another word for "spooky"? Discover the origins behind the word and why it's gained traction here. Dictionary Thesaurus Sentences Grammar Vocabulary Usage ... "Spoopy" Meaning: A Little Spooky, But Mostly Cute.

  21. Spoopy Meaning: Exploring the Origins and Popularity of the Internet's

    Overall, the difference between spoopy and spooky is largely a matter of tone and context. Spoopy is a lighthearted way to playfully embrace the spooky season, while spooky is more serious and often associated with genuine fear or unease. The Role of Internet Memes. If you've spent any time on the internet, you've likely come across a meme ...

  22. spooky

    spooky definition: strange and frightening: . Learn more. Dictionary; Translate; Grammar; Thesaurus +Plus Cambridge Dictionary +Plus; Cambridge Dictionary +Plus; My profile +Plus help; Log out {{userName}} ... Add spooky to one of your lists below, or create a new one. {{#verifyErrors}}

  23. Michigan primary 2024: What an 'uncommitted' vote means

    What does it mean to vote uncommitted? Each party's ballot for the presidential primary lists candidates seeking their party's nomination for the presidency along with an option to vote "uncommitted."

  24. What the demand for lithium could mean for one Southern California

    In Southern California's Imperial Valley, unemployment is high, wages are low and agriculture is the dominant industry. But the move to electric vehicles may turn the region into "Lithium Valley ...

  25. Three Alabama clinics pause IVF after court rules embryos are children

    The judges' decision came in response to a unique case in which a person wandered into an unlocked storage area at Mobile Infirmary in Mobile, Alabama, and dropped several frozen embryos on the floor.

  26. Paul Scully: Former minister and MP sorry for 'no-go' areas comment

    Covering an area of about eight sq miles (21 sq km) in London's East End and with a population of more than 310,000 people, Tower Hamlets is the most densely populated borough in England.

  27. Is the greater Columbus area in tornado alley? Here's what experts say

    A history of twisters:Search a database of tornadoes in Ohio since 1950 "Tornado alley" is a long swath of land that stretches over the great plains region of the U.S. and includes Oklahoma, Texas ...

  28. The Meaning Behind The Song: Spooky by Percy Sledge

    The use of the word "spooky" in the song's title and chorus adds a layer of mystery and intrigue. While the word may initially evoke images of ghosts and the supernatural, its meaning within the context of the song is metaphorical. In this case, "spooky" refers to the lingering presence of a past love, haunting the narrator's ...