ericson 23 sailboat

In an attempt to carve out a slice of the booming trailersailer market, Ericson introduced King's sprightly 23-foot sloop in 1968. Although the boat was designed to be trailerable, this was before the advent of the SUV and it was never intended to be hauled behind the family station wagon and dragged up to the lake for weekend outings. It is a real boat masquerading as a trailersailer and most 23s remained happily afloat all season. It is nice, however, to have the option of leaving the boat on a trailer during the off-season, saving ever-increasing yard storage fees. And should you get transferred, downsized, outsourced or just plain sick of sailing in the same place, you can hitch the trailer to a husky vehicle and head to sunnier climes.

There were two versions of the 23. The MK I, as it came to be called, was built until 1971 with around 140 boats launched. The MK II was introduced after a four-year hiatus. Approximately 270 more boats were built during a three-year production run. Most MK IIs were built as shoal-draft centerboarders. Prices for most used models fall between $2,000 to $4,000, making the Ericson 23 an exceptional used boat value.

First impressions Both versions of the Ericson 23 are good-looking boats. Each has a sweet, subtle sheerline, moderate freeboard and a sexy, sloping cabintrunk with two small portlights. The most obvious difference between models, aside from the centerboard, is the rudder. MK IIs have a transom-hung rudder while the MK I has the more common rudderpost mounted through the cockpit sole. The MK II deck is also a bit more flush, and the cockpit coaming boards of the MK I were exchanged for molded coamings. Although the MK II has a higher aspect sailplan, the mast on both boats is a beefy aluminum section, especially for a small boat, and is a bit of a load to hoist from the trailer, at least until you get the hang of it. Ericson used the same mast section on its 23, 25 and 27 models. The rig on the MK II translates into around 240 square feet of working sail area and that provides plenty of horsepower for the 3,200-pound Ericson 23. The MK II also came with a fixed keel however, as noted earlier, most were centerboard models. Naturally these latter models were easier for launching from a trailer and the less than 2-foot board-up draft makes the shallowest channels navigable. An optional hoist allows easy adjustment of the rudder, reducing drag downwind and depth for thin water sailing.

Construction The 23 features a solid fiberglass hull and a plywood reinforced deck. It may be small but in many ways the 23 is built like a bigger boat, Ericson didn't scale back on construction scantlings for its small boats. The port side main bulkhead is plywood and solidly tabbed to the hull. The starboard side is part of the hull pan. On MK I boats these bulkheads support the mast in lieu of a compression post. On the MK II model a compression post was added. The cabin sole is a molded pan and part of a liner that incorporates most of the interior furnishings. The fixed fin keel is bolted in place with backing plates on the MK I and the few MK IIs with fixed keels had internal lead for ballast. The centerboard is constructed around a steel web core with lead plates weighing 86 pounds and fiberglassed over.

What to look for Bob Boe, a recently retired math teacher from Lynchburg, Virginia, sails his Ericson 23 on nearby Smith Mountain Lake. Boe, who recently completed an offshore passage with me, is a fine sailor and honed his skills on his Ericson 23. To say he is passionate about the boat is putting it mildly. He heads up the Ericson 23 association and has compiled a trove of information including copies of the original manual. You can contact him at [email protected] . When looking at old Ericson 23s, Boe suggests that you should check the main bulkhead for signs of rot and delamination, particularly the port side. The port side chain plates may have leaked and over the years softened up the plywood. Some boats will have a sister plate to help transfer the load between bulkheads. Boe also suggests that you carefully inspect the centerboard. He and a friend rebuilt his last year and it was not a small undertaking. Naturally, any boat that is more than 30 years old will have gelcoat cracking and crazing. Check the standing rigging, some old trailerable boats still have the original rig. On deck The cockpit is comfortable and well set up for easy and efficient sail handling. The Mark IIs, with the transom-hung rudder, have a bit more space and legroom. Some early boats had a U-bolt on the cockpit floor for attaching the mainsheet, although most were delivered with either an optional traveler or a cabintrunk-mounted triangle mainsheet. While the main halyard is typically raised at the mast, the genoa halyard and centerboard pendant are accessed from the cockpit. The boat is ideal for singlehanded sailing, as everything is reachable from the tiller. There are two good-size cockpit lockers. Also, MK I models have a cut out in the transom for the outboard while MK II models will typically mount the engine on a bracket. The side decks are narrow and bit tricky to navigate with the low slung flush deck. Lifelines were optional and there are few good handholds. However, you must remember that this is a small boat, the stays are just a quick reach away as you make your way forward, and swinging forward of the mast is just another step. Deck hardware is light but adequate. It is interesting to look at the original brochure, the option list includes pulpits, masthead light, even the outboard motor bracket.

Down below There isn't much down below on the 23 and what there is needs to be discovered from a deep crouch, headroom is just over four feet. But you are not buying an Ericson 23 to live aboard, at best the interior provides a couple of decent bunks for camping out, a place to get out of the rain and a small galley for heating up coffee and light meals. The plan is straightforward with a V-berth forward. MK II models may have a head tucked behind the partial port bulkhead. The saloon has facing settees and a table can be mounted on the bulkhead. The galley is aft to starboard and includes a sink and usually a single or double burner stove top. The interior is nicely trimmed in mahogany on early boats and later in teak. This joinerwork separates the Ericson 23 from other plastic, stamped-out trailersailers of the same period. The 23 feels like a real boat.

Underway "The second best thing about the Ericson 23 is the way she sails," Boe said. "She's a great performer and is still winning races." Incidentally, according to Boe the best thing about the 23 is "her drop dead gorgeous looks, she has a beautiful profile in the water." Boe races his 23 MK I aggressively and sails to his 222 PHRF rating consistently. With a 19-foot, 6-inch waterline length the hull speed is just under 6 knots. Boe notes that his boat balances easily, even with a big headsail. Some boats will have tracks long enough to flatten out a 150-percent genoa. "The boat really comes alive in light air with a 150-percent," Boe said. "Under most conditions, when the sails are trimmed well the helm has a light, two-finger feel with good feedback and little strain on the helmsman." He also notes that weather helm can build in a puff but is easily controlled by traveler or mainsheet adjustment.

Engine An outboard engine was not provided by Ericson, that was up to the owner and today's boats have a wide variety of engines perched astern. Boe exchanged his 7.5-horsepower Evinrude for a 5-horsepower Mercury to save a few pounds. "I find the 5-horsepower will push the boat along at hull speed at about four-fifth throttle in a reasonable calm," he says. "I only miss the bigger engine when motoring into a choppy sea." One key advantage of an outboard is that when they need service you can loosen the clamps and haul it home or to the shop.

Conclusion The Ericson 23 is an especially handsome boat that is easy and rewarding to sail. It is inexpensive to purchase and maintain. It's a perfect starter boat and as your skills develop it can be raced with some success. Best of all, it's a boat that you will be proud to call your own.

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ericson 23 sailboat

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Ericson 23 Worth Buying??

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I'm just headed off to look at an Ericson 23, probably about 1976. Condition is probably neglected but not beyond some reasonable work. It has an older outboard, and a trailer. I was looking for a bigger boat, around 27, but I thought being a new sailor this might be a good boat to start with. Anyone have any knowlegde about this particular boat? Also, I'm concerned I might end up pouring a bunch of money into this boat, and end up with the price of a 27' foot boat, but have a 23' boat that is not worth near what I have into it. I don't have a feel for cost when it relates to fixing up a sailboat. Thanks in advance for any comments, I appreciate it.  

I don't know a ton about Ericsons, but I have had my share of 22'-25' boats. I think 23' is a perfect starter size. 27', although only a few feet longer, is a much bigger boat that takes a little experience to handle (mostly docking) and certainly is not easily trailerable. But what ever you decide, you'll always have the problem of putting in more money than you'll ever get back. Whether it be 23' or a 40', it's the same problem. "A hole in the water......"  

sailingdog

One idea, offer much less for the boat without the motor if you aren't sure and get a good used one or new. I'm guessing that for that size/age boat the motor and sails are actually what you are buying assuming the hull is ok (if it isn't, run, not walk away). I did that very thing since one of the things on my list was 'must get new/reliable' motor. I figured best way to do that was buy a boat without one and then get a new one. I spent roughly the same for the new motor as I did the boat. See my costs at the link below for an idea: http://www.sailnet.com/forums/buying-boat/30471-boat-dream-3.html#post125526  

Thanks, appreciate the comments. I understand that boats are not an investment, and I'm prepared to maybe have the boat not be worth what I get into it, just I don't want to be wildly out there. Does anyone have any comments about this particular boat, Ericson 23, performance, etc.? The boat appears to be sound, somewhat neglected, plan to have someone who knows more look at it. The trailer looks serviceable, dual axle, some rust. I don't know the condition yet of the sails and outboard. The asking price is $3000. Thanks again.  

Sailing Magazine I found this article, pretty good reading, can't personally vouch for it's veracity.  

tenuki, Sailormann... go see this thread... LINK  

troublemaker.  

Sailormann- You gotta admit some of Ian's bow accessories are damn pretty.  

Sailormann said: Undeniably - bad case of sour grapes on my part - but I'll never admit it Click to expand...
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OntarioTheLake

Ericson 23 1

The ericson 23 1 is a 22.58ft masthead sloop designed by bruce king and built in fiberglass by ericson yachts (usa) between 1969 and 1971., 140 units have been built..

The Ericson 23 1 is a light sailboat which is a reasonably good performer. It is very stable / stiff and has a low righting capability if capsized. It is best suited as a day-boat.

Ericson 23 1 sailboat under sail

Ericson 23 1 for sale elsewhere on the web:

ericson 23 sailboat

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  • General Ericson Forums
  • Design & Function

Ericson 23 mark II general questions

  • Thread starter JLC
  • Start date Sep 21, 2016
  • Sep 21, 2016

Hello there. New to the forum and hope I can get some feedback to my questions. Basically we are looking at downsizing to a 22 to 23 foot sailboat and deducted that the Ericson 23 Mark II with fixed keel is our first choice. I would appreciate any comments on the following: How well does this boat point into the wind? Is the deck core made of end grain balsa or something else? Is the keel lead? Keel to hull issues? Common defects or suggested upgrades? Performance of the tall mast version? Cheers Jocelyn  

Frank Langer

1984 ericson 30+, nanaimo, bc.

  • Sep 22, 2016

E23 ii Jocelyn: Wecome to the club. The deck of the 23 II is endgrain balsa, The keel is encapsulated lead, part of the hull layup. Not bolted on as some other manufacturers did. Sugested upgrade, midships cleat. Port & Stbd. Bob ERY23359M76I  

Loren Beach

Loren Beach

O34 - portland, or.

Ericson built an expensive "small yacht" for its era. The keel is an example - lead is a lot more dense than the cast iron commonly used in small Cal's and Columbia's. The same ballast # takes up approx 30% less volume in lead. This gives that boat a thinner keel profile and less drag. Basically, EY was building the smallest version of a line of boats intended for off shore racing and cruising. Another example was their use of a hull-to-deck join bonded together on the inside with roving. No stapled flanges or "coffee can" hull joint like the less expensive boats. Decades later any boat from that age will need to have systems rebuilt and decks carefully checked for moisture... but it is really good to have strong design and build quality underlying it all. Regards, Loren  

Thanks everyone, your feedback is much appreciated. I do like what I am reading. To get back to Frank above, sure is a small world !!! Yes we live in Leduc Alberta and do sail out of Sunshine Bay Yacht Club on lake Wabamum. In 2009 we purchased a 1985 Aloha 8.2 from a boat yard in Minnesota and trucked it back home. Restored it and much enjoyed but since the kids are on their own, doing young people’s things, and my wife is just not as keen about sailing as she used to be so it’s time for some change. Basically the next boat will primarily be for "I", giving me the option of trailering to different locations (our Aloha need to be craned in and out). I am doing my homework looking for a smaller boat that will still give me good all-around sailing characteristic and be well-constructed. It will be used primarily for day sailing but still want it to be big enough for 2 people to go for short cruises. Given what I could find about the Ericson 23 Mark II, I do like the characteristics which includes a fin keel, external rudder and tall mast versions. I work in aircraft maintenance so boat upgrades and /or repairs is just fine with me and will definitely consider sailboat in need of some TLC. Again, thanks to all of you for the feedback. Cheers  

Given your needs, you still might want to consider a San Juan 23 swing keel, which is a good sailboat, and easier to trailer than a swing keel. There are several on that lake as I recall. Build quality is probably similar to Ericson. I had the fin keel model and loved it, but the swing keel is easier to haul/trailer. Frank  

Second Wind

Junior member.

Frank Langer said: Given your needs, you still might want to consider a San Juan 23 swing keel, which is a good sailboat, and easier to trailer than a swing keel. There are several on that lake as I recall. Build quality is probably similar to Ericson. I had the fin keel model and loved it, but the swing keel is easier to haul/trailer. Frank Click to expand...

Thanks Steve, I will keep that in mind. As for you Frank, again it is a small world. Actually your previous SJ 23 with fin is at our club and I attempted to swap that boat with ours. The couple that owns it spend most of their weekend at the lake and they could use the extra accommodation our Aloha offers. Unfortunately, they have no plans to let it go for the next few years. I like the lines of the SJ23s and the swing keel version is readily available at very reasonable prices but I am leaning towards fixed keel boats if I can help it. I know that they are a pain at the ramp but a fixed fin has other benefits. As you are probably well aware, it is all a matter of compromises at the end of the day.  

Yes, that San Juan 23 was a great little boat for lake sailing. Good luck with your eventual decision! Frank  

supersailor

Contributing partner.

Hey Frank, Interesting that you sailed a San Juan 23. I have a San Juan 26 in the yard near the garage that I bought as a shell and redesigned everything on it. It's the big sister to the 23. Easy boat to trailer. Mine has never had bottom paint. Might send you the link on the building of Ghost. It might be hard to find a 23 or 26 as I have not seen many for sale. Jocelyn, Any of these choices would do a good job for you as long as you stay away from something like a Venture (zero build quality). Our Commodore just bought a Cape Dory Typhoon. Wonderful little boat around here. Not fast but it will bring him home when he foolishly goes out when he shouldn't. The merits and negatives of keels, keel center boards, swing keels, centerboards, and dagger boards can be debated endlessly. My choice was fixed ballast with basically unweighted centerboard. I didn't want 2000lbs of ballast swinging around on a pivot while I was offshore (San Francisco area). The fixed ballast was foremost in importance. I got a boat that I trailered everywhere with ease. That ease came after redesigning both the boat's mast raising setup and the trailer's bunking and winching systems. Very few boats or trailers come with well thought out launching systems. Ghost took 3 1/2 hours to launch on the first try. On the third try, the tangs snapped of on the pivot and the mast went over the side. :0 Really bad design on both the boat and trailer manufacturers parts. A total redesign of both the mast raising system and the trailer got the time for arrival at ramp to splash down to 35 minutes with two experienced people and 45 minutes while alone. Not bad for a fully set up 26 footer. I would go with the little fin keeler if I were going to keep the boat in the water for a season then pull it for the winter. The fin keel preforms best of all the choices and is not all that hard to pull out of the water at the end of the season. It is more hassle than the others. The best choices for more regular pull outs are the swing keel and keel-centerboard setups. They give lower ballast with the ease of trailering that less draught gives you. The centerboard only is much less stable and the daggerboard is a disaster if you ground. The keel-centerboard and fin keel have the pluses of no centerboard case intruding in the cabin. You are lake sailing so you don't have the concerns I had about getting knocked down off shore by a large wave and having 2000lbs if keel swinging inboard. Rae Ann and I are both Canadians originally. Rae Ann is from the Edmonton area and I'm from Vancouver. We are now Stateside but only 9 miles from the border and 20 miles from Victoria. If you get out this way. Give us a call. That little Ericson looks good. Bob  

  • Sep 23, 2016

Thanks Bob. I agree with your comments. I do sail with a friend that owns a Precision 21. It is a nice little boat. They do sail well and feel it is quite capable. Just to make it clear for anyone reading this tread, I do not think that centerboard boats are any less than a fixed keel boat. Far from it. In my case, the fixed keel version is my preference and I am willing to put up with more inconvenience at the ramp vs the added benefits we would get. A well set up trailer, low to the ground and a good mast raising system would go a long way to make launch and retrieval more manageable. A quick look on the internet showed me that there are few of those 23s on the market but I have time on my side. Somebody next month will be flying from Yellowknife to basically confirm my advertisement and shake hand on the deal. The catch is that they want to pick up the boat in the spring. So will see. I really do not want to own two boats so there is time to browse. I almost enjoy working on boats as much as sailing so any boats coming up with the right options will be considered. Our Aloha was sitting in that boat yard for almost 10 years. The hull was in sound condition but cosmetically very poor following an attempt from the previous owner to paint her. I took this basket case and brought her back to life. I included a link to the add so that you can see what she looks like. The cabin sole is actually ¼ inch Brazilian Mahogany that I milled (from high grade unfinished house flooring) and scarfed as solid flooring strips. The works is sealed with penetrating epoxy and varnished. Quite proud of the results and it looks as good as you see on the picture. The compass rose is also real wood veneer. http://www.kijiji.ca/v-sailboat/edm...c=topAdSearch&enableSearchNavigationFlag=true Thanks for your invitation to stop if we are in your area. The same for you guys if you come for a visit to Edmonton.  

Mark F

Hi Jocelyn, I don't know anything about this boat but just saw it on the San Francisco Craigslist. It is listed as a Mk2 but looking the photo I think it is a Mk1 - it would have to be a fixed keel; http://sfbay.craigslist.org/eby/boa/5791529697.html  

Blue-heron1975

  • Aug 13, 2023

how do you raise the mast on the 23-2? I downloaded the brochure and mast raising books from this website. But it is still sorta confusing. I live in the dalles Oregon want to use for the Columbia river  

Starrfiddler

  • Nov 16, 2023

Hello Blue-heron, I have owned my 23-2 for almost a decade in the Portland area and have not yet stepped the mast. I would like to learn how and didn't realize there is a brochure on this site with some details. Thank you for that information and I hope all went well with your mast raising.  

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Best Ericson Sailboats: A Complete Guide

Best Ericson Sailboats: A Complete Guide | Life of Sailing

Last Updated by

Daniel Wade

December 28, 2023

Sailboats that stand the test of time are often classics and loved by many sailors. One example is looking for the best Ericson sailboats, dating back to 1964.

Ericson had an up and down history but still managed to produce quality boats. So which ones were the best out of their lineup before their demise?

Out of the thousands of sailboats this company put together, there are a handful that stand out. The best Ericson sailboats consisted of the 26, 27, 29, 30, 32, 34, 35, 36C, E38, and 46 models. Each boat has a unique size and design, making them quite different from other brands at that time.

By 1999, the Ericson brand had been through enough over the years in terms of bankruptcy, ownership changes, and not keeping up with market demand by improving their boats. After poor sales that year, they decided to close shop for good, but still had plenty of produced sailboats to carry on the name.

According to experts in the sailing industry, Ericson sailboats were ahead of their time in the early 1970’s. They were a pioneer in the sailboat realm and built many classics that you can find for an affordable price today.

Table of contents

‍ Top 10 Ericson Sailboats

Through much debate, many sailors argue about which Ericson sailboat is the best. Many will claim a variety of factors influence trying to buy one today, such as price, condition, and size.

Depending on what suits your style of sailing and how you intend to use the boat will likely affect your decision on what is best. For Ericson, there are plenty of sizes and models to choose from.

1. Ericson 26

{{boat-info="/boats/ericson-26"}}

The 26 model offered a good size for sailors having a small crew or operating shorthanded with a fractional sloop. This one is just shy of 26 feet long and has about a five-foot draft. These were designed perfectly for day sailing or light cruising.

Bruce King helped develop this one, which turned out to be a stiff and fairly fast boat. Since it has self-tailing winches, and furling headsails, and you can control the mainsheet from the cockpit, it is easy to operate.

2. Ericson 27

{{boat-info="/boats/ericson-27"}}

The Ericson 27 debuted in 1971 with a displacement of 6,600 pounds and plenty of stability in the masthead sloop. The boat is roughly 27 feet long and sits about four feet in the water.

Many love this design since it navigated through choppy waters and responded to wind changes well. In addition, it can also sleep five comfortably.

There is enough sailing area to handle just about any condition and it is great for coastal cruising. If you have difficulty finding a crew or only want to be by yourself, this one makes it easy to handle all alone.

3. Ericson 29

{{boat-info="/boats/ericson-29"}}

Another masthead sloop rig type, the Ericson 29 is about 29 feet long with a draft of 4.33 feet. This one reached popularity among those that wanted to enjoy cruising and doing it at night.

There are sleeping accommodations for up to five people and plenty of room to move around. This design was similar to other popular models they produced, but not as easy to operate by yourself like the other shorter models.

4. Ericson 30

{{boat-info="/boats/ericson-30"}}

The Ericson 30 has an appeal like no other model in their lineup. They tweaked this design for about 10 years, making it one of the longer models they have played with.

It is nearly 30 feet long, has a fractional sloop, and sits nearly six feet in the water. It offers plenty of room to sleep five people and live aboard.

This is a great size to live on and learn about your boat without being too overwhelmed if you are new to that lifestyle. This one has become popular with sailors wanting to try that out.

5. Ericson 32

{{boat-info="/boats/ericson-32"}}

There were multiple designs of the Ericson 32 , with two of the most popular ones being designed by Bruce King in 1969 and 1985. The one in 1969 had a lot more problems, but they are both classics at 32 feet in length and a six-foot draft.

The later model was built for four years and they produced 700 of them. You will likely see many Ericson 32s with another number associated with it due to different features like the keel type or the optional tail rig.

Both the older and newer models of the 32s are attractive boats. If you are wanting the better of the two in terms of look, handle, and speed, you cannot go wrong with the latter model.

6. Ericson 34

{{boat-info="/boats/ericson-34"}}

The 34 footer installment was a good design with high-quality construction. This masthead sloop was nearly 35 feet and just over six feet of draft.

Depending on the year these were built, the exterior did not change that much in comparison to the interior. Out of all the boats that Ericson produced, they were most proud of the molding structure they used on this one.

The deck used a balsa core and had a plywood backing under the deck fittings to offer extra support. With the fiberglass hull, it provided one of the sturdiest options without compromising performance.

7. Ericson 35

{{boat-info="/boats/ericson-35"}}

The Ericson 35 was similar to the 34, with some slight differences. This one is nearly 36 feet and sits around 6.17 feet in the water.

This one was a good cruiser, with some models meant for casual sailing. It handled offshore sailing very well and had the classic look.

The interior made this boat easy to live on and accommodate over five people. Whether you are racing or living on it, this boat could do it all.

8. Ericson 36C

{{boat-info="/boats/ericson-36c"}}

The 36C was another beauty offered by Ericson, coming in at 36 feet and a five foot draft. This cutter rig is a great size, but you can still operate shorthanded if you do not have enough people on board.

This boat can do it all with coastal cruising, day sailing, and living full time on it. With its fiberglass hull, it is one of the lighter boats for its size. You could even race this if you wanted.

9. Ericson E38

{{boat-info="/boats/ericson-e38"}}

If you are looking for a larger Ericson boat, you cannot go wrong with the E38 . At nearly 38 feet long and 6.5 feet in the water, it offers the best of both worlds for living space and is easy to handle.

With the masthead sloop, you can expect top performance while cruising. This is another quality build that you can live aboard too.

10. Ericson 46

{{boat-info="/boats/ericson-46"}}

The largest boat that Ericson put together was the 46 , coming in just shy of 46 feet and about a seven-foot draft. With another masthead sloop design, you can rest assured the performance will be there.

There were actually two versions, one that is a racer and one that is a cruiser. Over a three-year period, only 20 of these were built. Depending on which one you find, there will be slight adjustments to the performance package.

Why Erickson Boats Are Popular

A lot of nautical miles have been made on Ericson boats over the years and for a good reason. They were quality boats that had a classic look, easy to handle, and were affordable.

Back in 1965, these were primarily cruising sailboats that later adapted to a hybrid of a family-oriented cruiser. Other models specifically included fin keels, excellent bustle, and spade rudders for better performance.

You will definitely find better modern boats that have more luxury, speed, and performance compared to something that was built in the 60s to the 80s. But for the price and nostalgia, it is hard to pass up a classic like Ericson.

What to Look for in Used Ericson Boats

As with any used boat, you need to thoroughly inspect it before trying to purchase one. This means going over the sails, mast, deck, engines, and anything else that catches your eye.

Potential Cracking

There have been some reports of very early models having cracks in the deck or mast. It is hard to blame them, since many boat designs have come a long way from over 40 years of being in the water. While very few have those reports, it is worth having it inspected by a professional before buying one.

Be Happy to Walk Away

Before committing to one, make sure that you know all of the histories before buying one. This will help you tremendously before you fall in love with its beauty.

Walking away and thinking it over for a few days can greatly help your buying process. You never know how urgent a seller might be, so you might end up getting a better deal on the price if you do decide to buy it after walking away.

Why an Ericson Sailboat Could Work for You

Ericson sailboats were unique luxury yachts that were built for speed. In addition, they had enough luxury on the inside that you could spend days or live on them for a period of time.

You typically can find one for a good price, which is why they are popular compared to other boats. With similar comparisons to other top-of-the-line sailboats, they make for a competitive option.

Luxury and Price

For those that want to buy an Ericson, they are all about luxury and performance for a good price . Since most models are over 40 years old, they are reasonably priced.

Depending on the size and model, almost all of the Ericson sailboats can be found within any budget. If you have experience fixing up boats, an Ericson can be worth its weight in gold.

Living Space

Customers that typically want an Ericson enjoy the amount of living space that it offers. On top of that, it provides the speed of comparable racers or cruisers that you will find today.

If you want a boat that allows you to live on to your own standards or race as you like, Ericson boats are the way to go. They offer the perfect blend of performance and comfort.

Stiff Builds

Ericson sailboats were strongly built and have a stiff feel to them. If a stiff boat is something you are after, the Ericson models are a good fit.

This means they have a different feel when sailing. If you were to buy one, it might take some getting used to if you have only handled newer boats.

Since Ericson boats have limited builds for each year that they were produced, you likely will not see them that often. They offer a nostalgic and classic look that only a few boats provide.

This creates a sense of urgency when buying. It is important to proceed with caution and check out the boat properly before you decide to jump on one.

The Rise and Fall of Ericson

Ericson was founded in 1963 and had a few molds to base designs of boats on to get started. After about a year and a half of poor production, they filed for bankruptcy since they were not hitting the mark with customers on their designs.

They were purchased in 1965 by Mark Pitman and Del Walton, who also hired Bruce King to begin designing their lineups. King is responsible for many of the best boats offered by Ericson, who even fine tuned some of his own creations a few years later.

Later in 1968, Pacific American Industries bought out Ericson and continued to produce similar models. CML group later purchased the brand and operated from 1971 to 1984.

Pacific Seacraft later bought the molds for various models, like Ericson 34 and 38 to move on with production. The brand continued to move forward with the same old designs without many changes.

Since the brand never pushed to market its products and management was lazy in trying to think of what the market wanted, sales dipped in the late 1990s. They never went boating shows or much of anything to promote their lineup. This caused Ericson to shut down for good.

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ericson 23 sailboat

1976 Ericson 23 sailboat

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Ericson 23 2 - Halyards

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IMAGES

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    ericson 23 sailboat

  2. 1975 Ericson 23 Mark II sailboat for sale in Oregon

    ericson 23 sailboat

  3. SailboatData.com

    ericson 23 sailboat

  4. 1975 Ericson 23 Mark II sailboat for sale in Oregon

    ericson 23 sailboat

  5. 1975 Ericson 23 Mark II sailboat for sale in Oregon

    ericson 23 sailboat

  6. 1975 Ericson 23 Mark II sailboat for sale in Oregon

    ericson 23 sailboat

VIDEO

  1. BERGSTEIGEN

  2. Ericson 23 MK2 Mainsail

  3. We keep dreaming, we keep pushing 👊

  4. Lot 78

  5. “SAIL” series

  6. Ericson #19 NABA'23 VB U10 vs Virgina Beach East

COMMENTS

  1. ERICSON 23-2

    Among the changes from the ERICSON 23-1: A transom hung rudder, higher aspect rig, and lower profile coach roof. A keel-centerboard version was, by far, the most popular. ... Like the LWL, it will vary with the weights of fuel, water, stores and equipment. A boat's actual draft is usually somewhat more than the original designed or advertised ...

  2. Ericson 23

    Ericson 23. Ericson was part of the vanguard, one of the early fiberglass builders that helped shape the course of the burgeoning American sailboat industry. The first Ericson, a 26-foot racer-cruiser, was launched in 1965. By the early 1970s the company was one of the country's leading builders and produced a range of boats from 23 feet to 46 ...

  3. Ericson 23-2

    The Ericson 23-2 is an American trailerable sailboat that was designed by Bruce King as a cruiser and first built in 1975. [1] [2] [3] The design was originally marketed by the manufacturer as the Ericson 23, but is now usually referred to as the Ericson 23-2 to differentiate it from the earlier 1969 Ericson 23-1 design.

  4. Ericson 23-2

    Ericson 23-2 is a 22′ 11″ / 7 m monohull sailboat designed by Bruce King and built by Ericson Yachts between 1975 and 1979. ... Sail area in square feet, derived by adding the mainsail area to 100% of the foretriangle area (the lateral area above the deck between the mast and the forestay). D: ...

  5. Ericson 23 Worth Buying??

    S. SailNet Archive Discussion starter. 87689 posts · Joined 1999. #1 · Apr 2, 2007. I'm just headed off to look at an Ericson 23, probably about 1976. Condition is probably neglected but not beyond some reasonable work. It has an older outboard, and a trailer. I was looking for a bigger boat, around 27, but I thought being a new sailor this ...

  6. Ericson 23 2

    The Ericson 23 2 is a 22.92ft masthead sloop designed by Bruce King and built in fiberglass by Ericson Yachts (USA) between 1975 and 1979. 270 units have been built. The Ericson 23 2 is a light sailboat which is a good performer. It is stable / stiff and has a low righting capability if capsized. It is best suited as a day-boat.

  7. Ericson 23 1

    The Ericson 23 1 is a 22.58ft masthead sloop designed by Bruce King and built in fiberglass by Ericson Yachts (USA) between 1969 and 1971. 140 units have been built. The Ericson 23 1 is a light sailboat which is a reasonably good performer. It is very stable / stiff and has a low righting capability if capsized. It is best suited as a day-boat.

  8. Ericson 23-1

    Ericson 23-1 is a 22′ 6″ / 6.9 m monohull sailboat designed by Bruce King and built by Ericson Yachts between 1969 and 1971. Sailboat Guide. Discover; Buy; Sell; ... Sail area in square feet, derived by adding the mainsail area to 100% of the foretriangle area (the lateral area above the deck between the mast and the forestay). D: ...

  9. Ericson 23-2

    Sailboat data, rig dimensions and recommended sail areas for Ericson 23-2 sailboat. Tech info about rigging, halyards, sheets, mainsail covers and more. Sailboat Data directory for over 8,000 sailboat designs and manufacturers. Direct access to halyards lengths, recommended sail areas, mainsail cover styles, standing rigging fittings, and lots ...

  10. Ericson 23 mark II general questions

    Sep 22, 2016. #4. Ericson built an expensive "small yacht" for its era. The keel is an example - lead is a lot more dense than the cast iron commonly used in small Cal's and Columbia's. The same ballast # takes up approx 30% less volume in lead. This gives that boat a thinner keel profile and less drag.

  11. Best Ericson Sailboats: A Complete Guide

    2. Ericson 27. r32_damax. The Ericson 27 debuted in 1971 with a displacement of 6,600 pounds and plenty of stability in the masthead sloop. The boat is roughly 27 feet long and sits about four feet in the water. Many love this design since it navigated through choppy waters and responded to wind changes well.

  12. Ericson 23-1

    The Ericson 23-1 is an American trailerable sailboat that was designed by Bruce King as a cruiser and first built in 1969. [1] [2] [3] The design was originally marketed by the manufacturer as the Ericson 23, but is now usually referred to as the Ericson 23-1 to differentiate it from the unrelated 1975 Ericson 23-2 design.

  13. Ericson 23 sailboat

    I intend to keep you posted on progress of the restoration of this Ericson 23 sailboat until it returns to the water. Please Subscribe here on to channel.

  14. Ericson boats for sale

    Ericson is a yacht brand that currently has 32 yachts for sale on YachtWorld, including 0 new vessels and 32 used yachts, listed by experienced yacht brokers mainly in the following countries: United States, Canada, United Kingdom and Thailand. Models currently listed on YachtWorld vary in size and length from 27 feet to 46 feet.

  15. Ericson 23 Sailboat Photo Gallery

    Ericson 23 Sailboat Photo Gallery. This Sailboat Photo Gallery is a collection of sailboat ads where you can see what people were willing to sell their sailboat for, and when. Ads are dated starting in 2004, undated ads are from previous years. Remember that these are "asking" prices, and probably not what the boat actually sold for.

  16. ERICSON 23-1

    It takes into consideration "reported" sail area, displacement and length at waterline. The higher the number the faster speed prediction for the boat. A cat with a number 0.6 is likely to sail 6kts in 10kts wind, a cat with a number of 0.7 is likely to sail at 7kts in 10kts wind. KSP = (Lwl*SA÷D)^0.5*0.5

  17. Ericson Yachts

    In 1968 the company became a subsidiary of Pacific American Industries and a new plant was built in Santa Ana , CA. By 1990, the Ericson brand had been acquired by Pacific Seacraft, which continued to build some of the later models until 1999, when it was retired. Original Address: 1931 Deere Avenue Santa Ana, CA 92705 USA MIC: ELY.

  18. Ericson sailboats for sale by owner.

    Ericson preowned sailboats for sale by owner. Ericson used sailboats for sale by owner. Home. Register & Post. View All Sailboats. Search. ... Sailboat Added 23-Apr-2019 More Details: Ericson 32 MK II: Length: 32' Beam: 10' Draft: 5' Year: 1976: Type: cruiser: Hull: fiberglass monohull: Engine:

  19. 1975 Ericson 23-2 project boat

    Project boat. Trailer, outboard, mainsail, RF Genoa, new gennaker. Deck, mast prepped for painting, primed with Interlux 2-part. ... Among the changes from the ERICSON 23-1: A transom hung rudder, higher aspect rig, and lower profile coach roof. A keel-centerboard version was, by far, the most popular. Draft (max.) 5.16' / 1.57m

  20. Ericson 23 sailboat for sale

    1976 Ericson 23. Fixed keel, Tall rig. Boat is in fantastic shape. Epoxy bottom. New bottom paint in April 2003. Same PHRF as Ranger 23. Ready to race or cruise. Huge sail inventory-4 jibs, 2 genoas (including Mylar 155), 2 mains and spinnaker. Comes with lots accessories-spin. pole, life jackets, lines, compass, etc.

  21. Ericson 23 2

    Pre-spec and custom mainsail, genoa and spinnaker halyards for your Ericson 23 2 Polyester and Dyneema lines for cruising and racing halyards. Full range of options. ... Our riggers are constantly working with sailboat owners to provide high-quality halyards for their cruising or racing sailboats. From traditional polyester double braid to the ...