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222 Offshore Receive UIM Class 1 Trophy In Monaco

Alex pratt returns to class 1 with dfyoung, 222 offshore take class 1 world title, this year’s uim class 1 world championship showcased the sport at its absolute best, with 222 offshore’s darren nicholson and giovanni carpitella delivering a near faultless, season-long campaign to win the title and the sam griffith trophy, the most coveted prize in world powerboat racing., doug wright powerboats to race in uim class 1 next year.

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Sarasota Powerboat Grand Prix Day One: Super Stock And Bracket Class Winners

The oldest saying in offshore powerboat racing is “to finish first, first you have to finish,” and that couldn’t have proven truer as the favorites in Super Stock and Bracket 500 succumbed well before the checkered flag waved on the first day of action at the 39th annual Sarasota Powerboat Grand Prix in Sarasota, Fla. Produced by Powerboat P1 , the Grand Prix is the third race of the  American Power Boat Association  Offshore National Championship Series and the second race of the  Union Internationale Motonautique  Class 1 World Championship Series.

fastest offshore powerboat racing

The Super Stock fleet at the Sarasota Powerboat Grand Prix included 11 catamarans. Photos by Pete Boden/ Shoot 2 Thrill Pix

In Saturday’s final race, the 11 boats in the Super Stock class took to the Gulf of Mexico. Winds were picking up and there were white caps, but conditions were fast and racy. As they did in the first two races of the season, the 32-foot Victory catamaran, Jackhammer , with owner/driver Reese Langheim and throttleman Julian Maldonado bolted to the lead. Giving chase was a pack of boats including the 32-foot MTI cat, CMR, with driver/owner Sean Conner and John Tomlinson subbing for Shaun Torrente on throttles. Throttleman Rusty Williams and driver Myrick Coil in the 32-foot Doug Wright, Performance Boat Center /FASS Diesel Fuel Systems, were in the mix as were owner/driver Daren Kittredge and throttleman Grant Bruggemann in the 32-foot Doug Wright, Northwing Offshore.

A total of 64 teams descended on the city on the west coast of Florida that has become one of the favorite sites in offshore powerboat racing. A checkered flag from Sarasota is rivaled only by one from the world championships in Key West, Fla., in November. The weekend kicked off with a party on Friday evening where fans could meet the teams at the 10th Street ramp party followed by racing in the bracket 500, 600 and 700 classes and Super Stock boats, plus Class 1 pole position qualifying on Saturday.

The day started with calm conditions, but winds slowly built through the day and temperatures in the mid-90s added to the challenge.

It didn’t take long for the teams in the ultra-competitive Super Stock class to push the limits. The 32-foot Doug Wright, LPC, with owner/throttleman Loren Peters and driver Anthony Smith, started moving up through the fleet when it rolled on the outboard leg of the 6-mile course that had the racers navigating in a clockwise direction. Competition was halted after less than a lap. Peters and Smith were OK and the boat was hauled back to the pits.

fastest offshore powerboat racing

The CMR team of Sean Conner and John Tomlinson ran a consistent race to earn the Super Stock-class checkered flag.

The carnage took its toll quickly. In that first lap, the 32-foot Doug Wright, Team Allen Lawn Care and Landscaping, appeared to have something torn off the stern and didn’t make the restart. Neither did the 32-foot Doug Wright, Team Bermuda.

After many Super Stock competitors voiced concerns about quick green flags in Cocoa Beach at the previous P1 Offshore race, the starters made sure the boats were grouped more fairly in Sarasota. When the green flag flew on the restart, Jackhammer jumped to the lead, with CMR, Performance Boat Center and the 32-foot Victory, Big East Construction, which is owned and driven by Cole Leibel and throttled by veteran Gary Ballough, giving chase in a tight pack.

It didn’t take long for attrition to rear its ugly head. Jackhammer had an engine go into guardian mode, which shuts down the 300-hp outboard to prevent more significant damage. “Nothing like stopping and going every 30 seconds,” Maldonado said. “We had a 14-second lead at the start and guardian started and never stopped.”

The team kept the boat on the same lap as the leaders and appeared to just be running for points.

CMR and Performance Boat Center battled for the lead, with each boat enjoying an advantage on different parts of the course.

“In head seas, they’d catch me, and in following seas, I’d catch them, and it went like that for a few laps,” said Tomlinson, who had raced with Coil in the Super Cat class previously and knew that he could enter a turn with his competitor/friend and not worry about any incidents or collisions.

fastest offshore powerboat racing

Check out the slideshow above for more images from the Super Stock race.

Unfortunately, the battle to the finish didn’t materialize when Performance Boat Center pulled off with mechanical issues. Big East Construction moved into second and appeared to be in position for a much-needed podium finish until broken motor mounts forced Ballough to shut down one engine and limp around the course attempting to gain as many points as possible.

With CMR in the lead, Torrente, who qualified for the pole position at an F1H2O tunnel boat race on Saturday afternoon in France, watched on his cell phone while eating dinner with his family. Tomlinson and Conner took the checkered flag followed by Pete and A.J. Bogino in the 32-foot Doug Wright, CoCo’s Monkey, and Jackhammer, which kept running because the race isn’t over until the checkered flag waves.

“I’m pacing the streets of France as we walk back from dinner,” Torrente said in a message to speedonthewater.com from overseas. “It was an amazing race. Sean was turning the boat incredibly and Johnny was getting used to the boat and kept getting quicker and quicker. I’m so thankful for him sitting in for me.”

But as we always report on speedonthewater.com, all results are unofficial pending official inspections and video reviews. According to the APBA Offshore Commission chairman Rich Luhrs, four combined lane infractions at the start and post-accident restart that resulted in four yellow cards (Luhrs declined to name the penalized teams.) That, in turn, changed the official finishing order. Though CMR retained the checkered flag, Jackhammer moved into second place, followed by Big East Construction in thrid.

Almost serving as a harbinger of what was to come, the Class 1 boats took to the 6-mile course to see who would claim the coveted inside lane on Sunday afternoon. The boats ran a “get-comfortable-with-the-course” lap and then followed that with two timed laps. The fastest time would give a team the pole position on Sunday. First up was the team of throttleman Steve Curtis and driver Brit Lilly in the 47-foot Victory cat, Huski Ice Spritz.

In the end, owner/driver Darren Nicholson and throttleman Giovanni Carpitella in their own 47-foot Victory, 222 Offshore Australia , posted the fast number of the day—3:05:85. Tomlinson, who is pulling triple-duty this weekend, joined driver Travis Pastrana and clocked the third fastest time of the day in their 50-foot Victory, Pothole Heroes. The other three Class 1 entries had mechanical issues and didn’t complete a lap.

fastest offshore powerboat racing

In the Bracket 500 class, throttleman Elijah Kingery and driver Eric Ullom ran a great race in their 29-foot Warlock, Bulletproof/Team Farnsworth.

Whetting Fans’ Appetites The offshore racing action kicked off at 1 p.m. when the Bracket 500, 600 and 700 classes took to the course. Bracket racing takes a different approach because each class has a set speed limit. If a team exceeds the speed limit, it “breaks out” and is penalized for doing so.

The Bracket 500 fleet had nine teams including two 30-foot Phantoms that racing fans would consider to be favorites. Owner/driver J.J. Turk and throttleman Micheal Stancombe were the defending national champions in TFR/XINSURANCE and when the race started, they had a strong challenge from throttleman Elijah Kingery and driver Eric Ullom in the 29-foot Warlock, Bulletproof/Team Farnsworth, and the father-son team of Rob and Vincent Winoski in their 30-foot Phantom, Bronx Phantom.

Bracket racing is about more than just making sure you don’t exceed your class’ listed speed. It’s about letting your competitors drive away from you when they are going faster in the heat of competition and run the risk of doing just that. That story didn’t pan out because TFR/XINSURANCE pulled off the course with a mechanical problem first, followed by Bronx Phantom.

“We kind of knew that Bronx Phantom broke out because we were at 74.9 mph and they pulled away from us so we backed down a bit to make sure we didn’t break,” Kingery said. “We let them go and then when we saw J.J. break, half a lap later, we could hear Bronx Phantom’s motor starting to break up.”

fastest offshore powerboat racing

Enjoy more pictures from the Bracket-class competition in the slideshow above.

This may have resulted in a historical finish with two 29-foot Warlocks finishing first and second in an offshore powerboat race. Hammerheads/Fly SRQ with driver Dennis Austin and throttleman Don Jackson took second followed by YabbaDabbaDo with driver Larry James and throttleman J.D. Ivines in third.

The second start of the day featured a deck-to-deck battle in Bracket 600 between a couple of 26-foot Joker V-bottoms for all five laps on the 6-mile course. George Ivey drove his new boat while Damon Marotta throttled Ivey Racing against a pair of 22-year-olds who have a big future in the sport, throttleman Ryan Stahlman and driver Reef Delanos in Freebird.

The two boats appeared to have a rope connecting their admiships cleats at the start. One took the lead and then the other but in the end Freebird continued its momentum after winning in Cocoa Beach.

“I’m definitely hooked,” said Stahlman, who started navigating in his father’s 41-foot Apache, Predator , last year. When asked what he learned from his race in Sarasota, the youngster said, “How to take corners when you have someone with you like that. You have to hold your lane.”

Finally, in the Bracket 700 class, Brian Guy, owner of the 21-foot Superboat, Jackhammer , gave a performance boat enthusiast the opportunity to check an item off his bucket list.

Instead of racing with his usual throttleman, Julian Maldonado, Guy ran with throttleman Francisco Duran, from San Juan, Puerto Rico, who is close with the Maldonado family.

fastest offshore powerboat racing

Jackhammer owner and driver Brian Guy won the Bracket 700-class race with Puerto Rican Francisco Duran, who was racing in the United States for the first time, on the throttle.

“He never raced a boat in the states and he always wanted to do this,” Guy said.

Guy added that he broke a couple blades off his prop on the first lap but could still run about 56 to 57 mph in the class bracketed at a top speed of 60. The battle was behind him as a pair of 22-foot Velocitys powered by single Mercury Racing 300Rs fought for position. In the end, Dees Nuts/Meara Classic Cars took second followed by Statement Marine .

As if letting Duran check an item off his bucket list wasn’t enough, Guy’s five-year-old daughter, Kora, also was on hand to see dad win.

“She helps out and is a big supporter of mine,” Guy said.

That’s something attrition can never take away.

fastest offshore powerboat racing

Spectators lined the beach in Sarasota to catch the racing action.

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fastest offshore powerboat racing

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fastest offshore powerboat racing

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The Excitement of Running a P1 Offshore Race Boat

  • By Charles Plueddeman
  • November 16, 2023

Overhead shot of offshore racing boat

In this age of 70 mph pontoons , 90 mph center-consoles and 150 mph sport cats, it’s pretty easy to experience eye-popping velocity on the water. So, there you are, the wind flapping your cheeks as you hold that throttle to the stop, one watering eye on the speedo as you bump the trim hoping to squeeze out the last bit of speed it will take to be the first boat to the poker-run card pickup. Maybe you even imagine that’s Reggie Fountain , Steve Curtis or Shaun Torrente at the helm of the boat you are pursuing, and instead of a king of hearts, there’s a big trophy waiting at the finish line. Well, dream on, Speed Racer. You’re going fast, but you are not racing, and your production-built motorboat is no race boat.

Steve Curtis throttles a real race boat. The Victory catamaran Huski Chocolate carried Curtis and drivers Travis Pastrana and Brit Lilly to the 2022 UIM Class 1 championship in the Powerboat P1 Offshore series. Last summer, we met Curtis and this boat, now rechristened Huski Ice Spritz, at the Mercury Racing Midwest Challenge in Sheboygan, Wisconsin, the fourth event on the five-race 2023 P1 schedule. The boat is owned by SVEA Racing Inc., based in Stuart, Florida, regarded as the benchmark in professionalism and experience in Class 1 and led by technical director Gary Stray, director of operations Scott Colton and crew chief Patrick Cleaveland.

Curtis, a 59-year-old Englishman and the son of Cougar Powerboats founder and racing catamaran innovator Clive Curtis, claimed his first Class 1 world championship in 1985 in Key West when he was 21 years old. In his career, Curtis has throttled more than 20 world champions. Who would be better to show us under the cowl of a Class 1 race boat than the acknowledged master of throttling racing cats?

Boat racers discussing strategy

Class 1 is the premier category of international offshore powerboat racing. A P1 Offshore event can include a number of classes, but only the Class 1 Championship is sanctioned by the UIM (Union Internationale Motonautique), the world governing body for all ­powerboating activities. Basic rules for Class 1 dictate a minimum boat length overall of 12 meters (about 39 feet) and a minimum weight of 5,400 kilograms (just over 11,900 pounds). There have been seven boats in the Class 1 field in 2023, ranging in length from the 43-foot Skater Monster Energy/MCON to the 51-foot Mystic dfYoung. The Huski Ice Spritz/SVEA Victory is 47 feet length overall, with a running surface of 41.5 feet, according to Curtis, and a 12-foot beam. Curtis explains that the bigger boats often have an advantage in rough conditions, but the smaller boats can be nimbler in a current on flatter water in a tight, multiturn closed course—the 5-mile course at Sheboygan had 10 turns.

“Courses have become smaller to make the event more spectator-­friendly,” Curtis says. “We used to run 40-mile laps and 200-mile races.”

The age of the Class 1 fleet is also surprising. Huski Ice Spritz/SVEA was built in 2007 by the Victory team in Dubai to a ­Michael Peters design.

“The boat has been rebuilt and repowered a number of times,” Curtis says. “I believe it was originally powered by Lamborghini V-12 engines. The boat has been crashed and repaired. The entire deck has been replaced, and the running surface adjusted as the engine package has changed.”

Carbon fiber bulkhead

Carbon, Of Course

The overall theme of a race boat is that every element is functional, and this is the key difference between Huski Ice Spritz and your go-fast rig. Speed and safety are all that matter. The hull and deck are laid up with a combination of carbon fiber and Kevlar composite, with foam coring of various density. Bulkheads are carbon fiber, molded in a combination of triangulation and U-channel shape, and bonded within the hull. Each sponson has a pair of steps that are about 1.5 inches deep and a single strake. The tunnel between the sponsons is designed to trap and compress air, which lifts the boat at speed. The tunnel is about 33 inches deep at the bow but only 22 inches deep at the transom.

A V-hull boat could run in Class 1, but the catamaran offers a significant advantage, according to Randy Scism, who helped establish the Victory team as a force in offshore racing before returning to the United States in 1998 to start performance boatbuilder Marine Technologies Inc.

“A comparable V-hull boat will be 20 to 30 mph slower at top speed,” says Scism, who designed the 48-foot MTI Class 1 cat ­XInsurance/Good Boy ­Vodka. “In some conditions, it might corner better, but it could never make up the difference in total lap time. The air cushion under a cat can carry 30 to 35 percent of the boat’s weight, so the bottom is not even touching small waves and chop.”

Builders seek to produce a boat that is significantly below the class minimum-weight specification. This allows each team to make weight using lead ballast—water ballast is not allowed—that can be positioned right on the stringers to keep the center of gravity as low as possible to enhance handling and help trim the boat. Weight, either lead bars or bags of lead shot, can be placed aft to lift the bow in calm conditions or forward to hold the bow down in rough water. Fuel tanks are located directly on the boat’s center of balance so that balance does not change as fuel is consumed. At race venues, a crane fitted with a scale lifts the Class 1 boats from the trailer to the water; this way, each boat is weighed every time it goes in and comes out of the water to prevent cheating.

At Class 1 speeds, aerodynamics becomes critical. The boats literally fly over the water, and the deck is flush with the top of each sponson. The enclosed cockpit is a teardrop blister, hatch latches and cleats are carefully recessed and faired, and air intake is accomplished with low-drag NACA ducts. When conditions are ideal, these huge boats appear to levitate with a grace that belies the brutal thrust required to reach speeds that can exceed 160 mph on the open ocean.

Looking at racing boat's tunnel

Prescribed Power

There are no surprises below the engine hatches of a Class 1 boat. Since P1 led a revival of the class in 2019, the Mercury Racing 1100 Competition engine has been standard power, a spec engine for the class. The 9.0-liter V-8 engine features Mercury Racing QC4 quad-valve cylinder heads and is boosted by twin turbochargers. Power output is 1,100 hp and 1,100 lb.-ft. of torque per engine on 93-octane pump gasoline. Each big V-8 turns 6,000 to 6,500 rpm. The transmission is the stout model designed for the Mercury Racing 1750 engine with a stronger input shaft and ­internal components.

“Before the switch to the Merc 1100, we were running engines making 1,850 to 2,000 hp at 7,500 rpm,” Curtis says, “and top speeds pushed 190 mph. Those engines needed a rebuild after each race.”

The point of a specified engine for the class is to reduce cost and ensure power parity among teams with unequal resources. With that in mind, the engines are tightly controlled. Teams are not allowed to make any adjustments or modifications to the engines. With the exception of the valve covers, the engines are sealed with special fasteners. At the beginning of each race weekend, the Mercury Racing support team delivers propulsion control modules (PCM) to each team. The PCM units are painted bright ­yellow so they are easy to identify. ­Mercury ­Racing also installs a data logger on each engine.

Mercury Racing 1100

“After every practice and ­every race, we download the data to make sure it makes sense and that nobody has tweaked on the engines and turned the power up,” says Steve Wynveen, Mercury Racing manager of development engineering. “The idea of Class 1 now is that winning is dependent on driving and boat setup, not on who has the most money to throw at an engine.”

The expectation is that if teams don’t abuse these engines by constantly banging into the rev limiter, each can last the season with just basic maintenance. Teams will put between two and three hours of run time on the engines at each race weekend. Teams are free to install their own PCM for testing between races.

The Huski Ice Spritz/SVEA team engineered a number of quick-disconnect fittings that allow it to remove an engine in about 20 minutes, according to Curtis. This team pulls its engines after each race for maintenance and inspects the bilge and engine mounts below the engines. Typical maintenance includes an oil and filter change, checking the valve lash and adjusting with shims, a compression and leak-down test, checking the turbocharger ­waste-gate adjustment, and ­torquing all fasteners and clamps.

Six of the boats in this Class 1 fleet use surface drives based on a BPM model to put power to the water. The Italian drive only articulates in the vertical plane, which provides a limited range of trim, generally less than 15 degrees or, according to Curtis, about 1.5 inches at the propeller. The prop is located about 58 inches abaft the transom. A drop box located on the exterior of the transom allows teams to quickly change gear ratios to best match engine torque to the prevailing conditions. Curtis explains that on today’s short courses, ­acceleration out of turns is often more important than top speed. Teams using a surface drive are limited to three prop sets but have unlimited gear ratios. Steering is accomplished by a center-mounted rudder—a knife-sharp polished stainless Italian Flexitab model on Huski Ice Spritz—and teams can change rudders based on water conditions.

Surface drives on a racing boat

A sterndrive is also permitted in Class 1, but if the sterndrive can steer, the boat is not allowed to use a rudder. The MTI XInsurance/Good Boy Vodka boat is rigged with modified Mercury Racing M6 sterndrives. Trim is retained, but the skegs are cut off and steering is locked. The boat is equipped with a rudder. Teams running sterndrives are allowed an unlimited number of propellers.

“The problem with trying to steer these boats with the sterndrives is that when you turn the drive, one prop is pushed into water and the other into the air coming through the tunnel,” Scism says. “The prop in the air loses thrust. You want to keep both props centered behind the sponsons. I prefer to use the M6 drives for the added trim authority. That drive is plenty rugged for these engines.”

Read Next: How to Boat Safely at Any Speed

Offshore racing boat cockpit

Curtis throttles with his right hand gripping a pair of Mercury Zero Effort controls topped with red plastic knobs molded to the shape of his hand. To his left is a fixed, molded grip with radio/intercom control buttons, trim control, and a button to change the screen display. Curtis can communicate with his team using VHF and UHF radios, and a cellular connection. Below is a pair of Mercury ignition keys, which we were surprised to see.

“When we went to the standard Merc 1100 engines, we wanted to retain the entire stock wiring harness to prevent any sort of tampering,” Curtis says. “So, there are the keys, just like on your fishing boat. It was the ­easiest solution.”

Facing Curtis are a pair of Livorsi turbocharger boost gauges, a Livorsi trim indicator, and a multifunction display usually showing tachometers. In the center of the dash is a Garmin MFD split between navigation and a rearview camera. The driver sits before a quick-release steering wheel with a lap counter on top of the dash, which will also display a yellow-and-red flag signal from race control.

I wish I could describe the ­sensation of driving Huski Ice Spritz at speed while looking through the slit of a windscreen. But as it turns out, there is not enough liability coverage or legal cover to ever make that happen. Scism says MTI will build you a new 48 Race model to Class 1 specs, with a price tag of $2.2 million to $2.4 million with power. A $500,000 budget will cover a bare-bones Class 1 team for a season, Curtis says, with a well-financed team spending more than $1.5 million. SVEA Racing Inc. brings a crew of 10 to each race with a 70-foot race trailer, a tilting boat trailer and its Kenworth hauler, and a world-champion throttleman. They are not going to a poker run.

Racing boat offshore

Safety First

When Steve Curtis won his first Class 1 championship, he was standing in an open cockpit. “There was very little concern for safety in those boats,” Curtis says. “If you stuffed the boat, it was very likely you’d be killed.”

Today the driver and throttle work in an enclosed cockpit that is all business. This is not your pleasure boat—there is no Alcantara upholstery, no bass-pumping audio system, and no LED-illuminated drink holders. Cockpit entry is through a hatch secured with four sliding bolts like a bank vault. In Huski Ice Spritz, Curtis throttles from the port seat, and the driver is at the wheel to starboard. Deep bucket seats have 2 inches of suspension travel, and the crew is strapped securely in place. “During a race, it can actually get rather violent in here,” Curtis says. “It’s not very noisy, but there is a lot of vibration, even in smooth water, because the boat is so rigid. We can feel pretty beat up after a race.”

Cockpit hatch locking door

A cage of carbon channels surrounds the cockpit, which Curtis says is backed by a very thick bulkhead. Crush zones around the cockpit are designed to absorb energy on impact. The interior is raw and black, with no thought of cosmetics. The forward portion of the cockpit structure is formed by a ¾-inch-thick polycarbonate shield modeled after a fighter-jet canopy. The clear portion is minimized for further crew protection. There’s an emergency escape hatch in the floor for egress if the boat flips. The driver and throttle have a 10-minute emergency air supply.

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Offshore Powerboat Racing Returns to Atlantic City June 2024 With High-Octane Thrills

ATLANTIC CITY, NJ (February 8, 2024) – The Offshore Powerboat Association (OPA) , a powerhouse in the world of offshore powerboat racing, is making a triumphant return to Atlantic City, New Jersey. This summer the Atlantic City Grand Prix will set hearts pounding and spectators on the edge of their seats.  

In an electrifying partnership with Visit Atlantic City and the resort casinos, the Offshore Powerboat Association will once again set the Atlantic Ocean ablaze with excitement on June 22, 2024. Atlantic City will play host to the most anticipated offshore high-performance race of the year, marking the grand debut of the OPA National Championship Series on the upper east coast of the United States.  

Atlantic City is beyond excited to see sleek, high-powered vessels once again tearing through the Atlantic waves, competing for glory and speed supremacy. The fastest and most formidable teams from around the globe will converge to vie for victory, making this a spectacle not to be missed.  

This thrilling collaboration between the Offshore Powerboat Association, Visit Atlantic City, and the city’s Casinos underscores a shared commitment to ignite excitement and showcase the beauty of America’s Playground. Nestled against Atlantic City’s breathtaking coastal backdrop, the event promises a mesmerizing blend of heart-stopping action and scenic beauty that will captivate racing enthusiasts.  

“We are thrilled to bring our world-class boat racing back to the shores of Atlantic City,” said Nick Smith, the Vice President of the Offshore Powerboat Association. “This promises to be a monumental event, showcasing the premier racers and race boats, speed, and the sheer excitement of powerboat racing. We are grateful for the collaboration with the Mayor, Visit Atlantic City, the Atlantic City Sports Commission, CRDA, and the casinos and other hotels and businesses. We look forward to delivering a spectacular show for both residents and visitors.”  

Larry Sieg, the President & CEO of Visit Atlantic City and the Atlantic City Sports Commission, echoes that sentiment, saying: “We are extremely proud to host the Offshore Powerboat Association in Atlantic City this summer. After an absence of six years, this is hopefully the return of OPA for many years to come to showcase the beauty of Atlantic City and the thrilling sport of Powerboat Racing.”  

A press conference is scheduled for February 23 at 11:00 a.m. at ISLAND Waterpark at Showboat Resort to announce more details about the racers, the competition and events leading up to the June 22 Grand Prix.  

Photos available upon request.

About Offshore Powerboat Association The Offshore Powerboat Association is a leading organization in offshore powerboat racing, dedicated to promoting and organizing high-performance racing events that push the boundaries of speed and excitement. About Visit Atlantic City Visit Atlantic City is a 501(c)(6) organization formed and funded as a public-private partnership by the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority (CRDA) to create economic development through conventions, sporting events, film production and group tourism. Visit Atlantic City focuses on three primary objectives: sales, marketing and services.

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P1 Offshore;

Powerboat P1 is the fastest growing marine motorsport series in the world and has a long term commitment to growing and developing the sport of power boating at all levels. The Powerboat P1 team works closely with the sport’s governing bodies, the UIM, APBA and the IJSBA. P1 has delivered more than 85 world championship events in over twelve different countries for more than a decade.

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Fri 17 - Sun 19, May

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fastest offshore powerboat racing

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Engines - twin inboard:

  • 750HP – APBA approved only
  • Catamaran – 34’ to 42’
  • Fully enclosed race canopy
  • 93 Octane or less

WELCOME TO BULLET OFFSHORE RACING

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TO BULLET OFFSHORE RACING

The Cowes-Torquay-Cowes powerboat race is considered to be one of the toughest and most prestigious offshore powerboat races in the world. The race covers a distance of approximately 190 nautical miles, starting and finishing in Cowes on the Isle of Wight, England, and passing through Torquay on the south coast of England.

The race has a rich history, dating back to 1961, and has attracted some of the biggest names in powerboat racing over the years. Drew Langdon is a British powerboat racer who has competed in the Cowes-Torquay-Cowes race, as well as other offshore powerboat races around the world. He has achieved multiple victories and podium finishes in various powerboat racing events throughout his career.

Pressing on at the week end – A second win in the championship at Poole Bay Classic

Poole Bay 100 is an offshore powerboat race that takes place annually in Poole Bay, on the south coast of England. The race covers a distance of 100 nautical miles and is organized by the UK Offshore Powerboat Racing Association (UKOPRA).The UKOPRA is the governing body for offshore powerboat racing in the UK and is responsible for organizing a number of offshore powerboat races throughout the country. The organization sets the rules and regulations for the races and ensures that they are conducted safely and fairly.

The Poole Bay 100 is one of the most popular races organized by the UKOPRA and attracts competitors from all over the world. The race takes place in September each year and features a variety of different classes of powerboats, ranging from smaller entry-level boats to larger high-performance racing boats.

The Lymington Challenge is an offshore powerboat race that takes place in Lymington, a coastal town located in Hampshire, England. The race covers a distance of approximately 100 nautical miles and is organized by the Lymington Powerboat Racing Club.

The Lymington Challenge is open to powerboats of all types and sizes, and is known for attracting a diverse range of competitors, from amateur enthusiasts to professional racers. The race is typically held in June or July each year and is one of the highlights of the UK offshore powerboat racing calendar.

The course for the Lymington Challenge takes competitors along the Solent, around the Isle of Wight, and back to Lymington. The race is known for its challenging conditions, with strong currents, rough seas, and shifting winds adding to the difficulty of the race. Despite the challenges, the Lymington Challenge is a popular event among powerboat racing enthusiasts and is widely regarded as one of the most exciting offshore powerboat races in the UK.

2019 CTC – 1ST OVER ALL WITH AN AVERAGE SPEED OF 92.87 MPH

The Cornish 100 Trophy is an offshore powerboat race that takes place in Cornwall, a county located in the southwest of England. The race covers a distance of approximately 100 nautical miles and is organized by the South West Offshore Racing Association (SWORA).

The Cornish 100 Trophy is open to powerboats of all types and sizes, and typically attracts a range of competitors from amateur enthusiasts to professional racers. The race is usually held in July or August each year and is one of the most popular offshore powerboat races in the UK.

The course for the Cornish 100 Trophy takes competitors along the Cornish coast, past rugged cliffs and beautiful beaches, and around the famous Land’s End landmark. The race is known for its challenging conditions, with strong winds, choppy seas, and unpredictable weather adding to the difficulty of the race.

Despite the challenges, the Cornish 100 Trophy is a popular event among powerboat racing enthusiasts and offers a unique opportunity to experience the stunning coastline of Cornwall from the water.

The John Mace Perpetual Trophy

The Late Mike Fiore was awarded ‘The John Mace Perpetual Trophy’. I was honoured to accept on his behalf at The Royal Yacht Squadron Cowes UK for his contribution to Powerboat development. Mike having designed and built my Outerlimits SV43 which has now given us two consecutive wins at the International Cowes Torquay Cowes Powerboat Race In 2018 & 2019.

UKOPRA MARATHON WORLD CHAMPION 2018

CLASS 1 OFFSHORE RACING

Offshore racing in the UK is a highly competitive and exciting sport that involves high-performance powerboats and attracts top teams and drivers from around the world. The sport is governed by two main organizations: the British Powerboat Racing Club (BPRC) and the UK Offshore Racing Association (UKOPRA).

The BPRC is responsible for organizing and promoting the races themselves, while the UKOPRA oversees the technical and safety aspects of offshore powerboat racing in the UK.

Class one vee powerboats are a popular type of powerboat used in offshore racing in the UK. These boats are designed for speed and maneuverability, and can reach speeds of up to 120 mph. They are typically piloted by a team consisting of a driver and a throttleman, who work together to control the boat’s speed and direction.

Offshore racing events in the UK featuring class one vee powerboats include the Cowes-Torquay-Cowes and Poole-Bournemouth-Poole races, as well as the Guernsey Gold Cup and the Falmouth Fowey race. These events are highly competitive and attract large crowds of fans and spectators.

Safety is a top priority in offshore racing with class one vee powerboats, and strict rules and regulations are in place to ensure the safety of the drivers, teams, and spectators. The boats are equipped with advanced safety features like roll cages, fire suppression systems, and emergency air supplies for the crew.

Experience the Thrill : Class 1 Vee Powerboat Racing

Dive into the adrenaline-fueled world of Class 1 Vee racing, where cutting-edge technology meets extreme speed. Governed by the Union Internationale Motonautique (UIM), the sport’s international authority, Class 1 Vee racing adheres to stringent rules and regulations, covering everything from boat design to team requirements.Constructed with precision and safety in mind, these boats boast specific hull designs, cockpit layouts, and engine specifications. Advanced materials like carbon fiber and Kevlar ensure both strength and minimal weight, allowing for optimal performance.

Behind the wheel, a skilled duo of driver and throttleman work in harmony to master the boat’s speed and direction. The driver focuses on steering, while the throttleman fine-tunes the boat’s power, adjusting the throttles accordingly.Racecourses, marked by buoys or other markers, challenge teams with multiple laps around 6-8 mile-long tracks. The length and difficulty of these courses can vary based on location and conditions, but one thing remains constant: sheer exhilaration.

Propelled by twin engines generating up to 1750 horsepower each, these powerboats can reach astonishing speeds of up to 120 mph. However, with great power comes great responsibility, and safety is paramount in Class 1 Vee racing. Advanced features like roll cages, fire suppression systems, and emergency air supplies keep the crew protected.Before joining the ranks of this high-octane sport, drivers and teams must undergo extensive training and certification. Only then can they experience the unbridled thrill of Class 1 Vee racing. Join the excitement, and witness powerboat racing at its finest.

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Powerboat fans in for swell time off Napier

Doug Laing

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The Napier Offshore 100 powerboat race in 2019. Photo / Paul Taylor.

An offshore powerboat racer has no qualms in tackling Napier’s Offshore 100 despite having a boat wrecked in the notorious conditions.

Mike Gerbic returns on Saturday for the country’s longest-surviving powerboat race, which starts at 11am.

The Napier event, which attracts mainly Queen’s City racers, is being revived after a three-year lapse caused by Covid-19.

Gerbic recalls hitting the swells on the race’s back leg - from off Napier Port, towards Bay View - about six years ago.

The Napier Offshore 100 poweboat race in 2019. Photo / Paul Taylor.

When the boat rounded the north point to head south along Westshore Beach, the hull “delaminated”.

After limping back to race headquarters in Napier’s inner harbour, an inspection revealed its racing days were over.

“Over. Off to the tip,” Gerbic told Hawke’s Bay Today , as he looked forward to racing the latest vintage of Espresso Engineers team boats.

As the New Zealand Offshore Powerboat Association focuses on Napier to get its annual drivers’ championship series moving again, Gerbic is back, undaunted, and says: ”The swells were four metres one year”.

The Napier race hasn’t taken place since 2020 , but it has a history dating back to the 1970s.

A vantage point at the Napier Offshore 100 powerboat race in 2018. Photo / Paul Taylor.

Other races are on sheltered courses such as Lake Taupo, or harbours or firths.

The Hawke’s Bay challenge attracts racers as it is regarded - as a prominent driver once said - as the “only true offshore race in the series”.

Large catamarans of more than 14 metres, from as far as Australia, had raced in the past, but the current fleet is limited to about 10 metres.

NZPBA president Paul Greenfield says Napier, race five in a six-race series this year, is one of three the association is keen to foster, because of the history, and conditions.

The crews arrive in Napier on Friday and will be based at the Hawke’s Bay Sports Fishing Club, with the boats parked for public viewing on the neighbouring reserve.

The racing is best watched from Westshore, from the points at the entrance to the inner harbour, the Hardinge Rd foreshore and the sweep towards the port entrance.

Among the fleet is Red Steel, raced by now retired Napier racer and former national drivers champion Tony Carson , who also raced with Auckland-based brother Wayne Carson .

fastest offshore powerboat racing

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